Intervention Review

Psychosocial interventions for supporting women to stop smoking in pregnancy

  1. Catherine Chamberlain1,*,
  2. Alison O'Mara-Eves2,
  3. Sandy Oliver2,
  4. Jenny R Caird2,
  5. Susan M Perlen3,
  6. Sandra J Eades4,
  7. James Thomas2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group

Published Online: 23 OCT 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 25 JUN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001055.pub4


How to Cite

Chamberlain C, O'Mara-Eves A, Oliver S, Caird JR, Perlen SM, Eades SJ, Thomas J. Psychosocial interventions for supporting women to stop smoking in pregnancy. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 10. Art. No.: CD001055. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001055.pub4.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Monash University, Global Health and Society Unit, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

  2. 2

    University of London, EPPI-Centre, Social Science Research Unit, Institute of Education, London, UK

  3. 3

    Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Healthy Mothers Healthy Families Research Group, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia

  4. 4

    University of Sydney, School of Public Health, Sydney School of Medicine, Sydney, NSW, Australia

*Catherine Chamberlain, Global Health and Society Unit, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, L3/89 Commercial Road, Melbourne, Victoria, 3181, Australia. chamberl@ihug.com.au. catherine.chamberlain@monash.edu.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 23 OCT 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Tobacco smoking in pregnancy remains one of the few preventable factors associated with complications in pregnancy, stillbirth, low birthweight and preterm birth and has serious long-term implications for women and babies. Smoking in pregnancy is decreasing in high-income countries, but is strongly associated with poverty and increasing in low- to middle-income countries.

Objectives

To assess the effects of smoking cessation interventions during pregnancy on smoking behaviour and perinatal health outcomes.

Search methods

In this fifth update, we searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (1 March 2013), checked reference lists of retrieved studies and contacted trial authors to locate additional unpublished data.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials, cluster-randomised trials, randomised cross-over trials, and quasi-randomised controlled trials (with allocation by maternal birth date or hospital record number) of psychosocial smoking cessation interventions during pregnancy.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently assessed trials for inclusion and trial quality, and extracted data. Direct comparisons were conducted in RevMan, and subgroup analyses and sensitivity analysis were conducted in SPSS.

Main results

Eighty-six trials were included in this updated review, with 77 trials (involving over 29,000 women) providing data on smoking abstinence in late pregnancy.

In separate comparisons, counselling interventions demonstrated a significant effect compared with usual care (27 studies; average risk ratio (RR) 1.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.19 to 1.75), and a borderline effect compared with less intensive interventions (16 studies; average RR 1.35, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.82). However, a significant effect was only seen in subsets where counselling was provided in conjunction with other strategies. It was unclear whether any type of counselling strategy is more effective than others (one study; RR 1.15, 95% CI 0.86 to 1.53). In studies comparing counselling and usual care (the largest comparison), it was unclear whether interventions prevented smoking relapse among women who had stopped smoking spontaneously in early pregnancy (eight studies; average RR 1.06, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.21). However, a clear effect was seen in smoking abstinence at zero to five months postpartum (10 studies; average RR 1.76, 95% CI 1.05 to 2.95), a borderline effect at six to 11 months (six studies; average RR 1.33, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.77), and a significant effect at 12 to 17 months (two studies, average RR 2.20, 95% CI 1.23 to 3.96), but not in the longer term. In other comparisons, the effect was not significantly different from the null effect for most secondary outcomes, but sample sizes were small.

Incentive-based interventions had the largest effect size compared with a less intensive intervention (one study; RR 3.64, 95% CI 1.84 to 7.23) and an alternative intervention (one study; RR 4.05, 95% CI 1.48 to 11.11).

Feedback interventions demonstrated a significant effect only when compared with usual care and provided in conjunction with other strategies, such as counselling (two studies; average RR 4.39, 95% CI 1.89 to 10.21), but the effect was unclear when compared with a less intensive intervention (two studies; average RR 1.19, 95% CI 0.45 to 3.12).

The effect of health education was unclear when compared with usual care (three studies; average RR 1.51, 95% CI 0.64 to 3.59) or less intensive interventions (two studies; average RR 1.50, 95% CI 0.97 to 2.31).

Social support interventions appeared effective when provided by peers (five studies; average RR 1.49, 95% CI 1.01 to 2.19), but the effect was unclear in a single trial of support provided by partners.

The effects were mixed where the smoking interventions were provided as part of broader interventions to improve maternal health, rather than targeted smoking cessation interventions.

Subgroup analyses on primary outcome for all studies showed the intensity of interventions and comparisons has increased over time, with higher intensity interventions more likely to have higher intensity comparisons. While there was no significant difference, trials where the comparison group received usual care had the largest pooled effect size (37 studies; average RR 1.34, 95% CI 1.25 to 1.44), with lower effect sizes when the comparison group received less intensive interventions (30 studies; average RR 1.20, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.31), or alternative interventions (two studies; average RR 1.26, 95% CI 0.98 to 1.53). More recent studies included in this update had a lower effect size (20 studies; average RR 1.26, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.59), I2= 3%, compared to those in the previous version of the review (50 studies; average RR 1.50, 95% CI 1.30 to 1.73). There were similar effect sizes in trials with biochemically validated smoking abstinence (49 studies; average RR 1.43, 95% CI 1.22 to 1.67) and those with self-reported abstinence (20 studies; average RR 1.48, 95% CI 1.17 to 1.87). There was no significant difference between trials implemented by researchers (efficacy studies), and those implemented by routine pregnancy staff (effectiveness studies), however the effect was unclear in three dissemination trials of counselling interventions where the focus on the intervention was at an organisational level (average RR 0.96, 95% CI 0.37 to 2.50). The pooled effects were similar in interventions provided for women with predominantly low socio-economic status (44 studies; average RR 1.41, 95% CI 1.19 to 1.66), compared to other women (26 studies; average RR 1.47, 95% CI 1.21 to 1.79); though the effect was unclear in interventions among women from ethnic minority groups (five studies; average RR 1.08, 95% CI 0.83 to 1.40) and aboriginal women (two studies; average RR 0.40, 95% CI 0.06 to 2.67). Importantly, pooled results demonstrated that women who received psychosocial interventions had an 18% reduction in preterm births (14 studies; average RR 0.82, 95% CI 0.70 to 0.96), and infants born with low birthweight (14 studies; average RR 0.82, 95% CI 0.71 to 0.94). There did not appear to be any adverse effects from the psychosocial interventions, and three studies measured an improvement in women's psychological wellbeing.

Authors' conclusions

Psychosocial interventions to support women to stop smoking in pregnancy can increase the proportion of women who stop smoking in late pregnancy, and reduce low birthweight and preterm births.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Psychosocial interventions for supporting women to stop smoking in pregnancy

Smoking during pregnancy increases the risk of the mother having complications during pregnancy and the baby being born with low birthweight and preterm (before 37 weeks). Tobacco smoking during pregnancy is relatively common, although the trend is towards it becoming less frequent in high-income countries and more frequent in low- to middle-income countries.

The review showed that psychosocial interventions to support women to stop smoking increased the proportion of women who stopped smoking in late pregnancy and reduced the number of low birthweight and preterm births. There did not appear to be any adverse effects from the psychosocial interventions, and three studies measured an improvement in women's psychological wellbeing.

The review includes 86 randomised controlled trials, with data from seventy-seven trials (involving over 29,000 women). Nearly all studies were in high-income countries. The intervention that supported the most women to stop smoking in pregnancy appeared to be providing incentives. However, these results are based on only four trials with a small number of women (all in the US), and they only seemed to help women stop smoking when provided intensively (three trials). Counselling also appeared to be effective in supporting women to quit, but only when combined with other strategies (27 trials). The effectiveness of counselling was less clear when women in the control group received a less intensive smoking intervention (16 trials). Feedback also appeared to help women quit, but only when compared with usual care and combined with other strategies (two studies). It was unclear whether health education alone helped women quit, but the numbers of women involved in these trials were comparatively small. The evidence for social support was mixed; for instance, targeted peer support appeared to help women quit (five trials) but in one trial partner support did not. Women also reported that peer and partner support could be both helpful and unhelpful.

Increasing the frequency and duration of the intervention did not appear to increase the effectiveness. Interventions appeared to be as effective for women who were poor, as those who were not; but there is insufficient evidence that the interventions were effective for ethnic (five trials) and aboriginal women (two trials). Trials where the interventions became part of routine pregnancy care did not appear to help more women to quit, which suggests there are challenges to translating this evidence into practice.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions psychosociales pour encourager les femmes à arrêter de fumer pendant la grossesse

Contexte

Le tabagisme pendant la grossesse reste l'un des quelques facteurs pouvant être évité et qui est associé à des complications pendant la grossesse, à la mortinatalité, à l’insuffisance pondérale, à une naissance prématurée et à de graves conséquences à long terme pour les femmes et les bébés. Le tabagisme pendant la grossesse est en baisse dans les pays à revenu élevé, mais il est fortement associé à la pauvreté et s’accroît dans les pays à faible et moyen revenu.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets des interventions de sevrage tabagique pendant la grossesse sur le comportement tabagique et les critères de jugement cliniques périnataux.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Dans cette cinquième mise à jour, nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre des essais cliniques du groupe Cochrane sur la grossesse et la naissance (1er mars 2013), vérifié les références bibliographiques des études trouvées et contacté les auteurs des essais afin de localiser des données supplémentaires non publiées.

Critères de sélection

Essais contrôlés randomisés, essais randomisés par groupe, essais croisés randomisés et essais contrôlés quasi-randomisés (répartis par date de naissance ou par date d’admission à l'hôpital) des interventions psychosociales portant sur le sevrage tabagique pendant la grossesse.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment évalué les essais à inclure et la qualité des essais et extrait les données de manière indépendante. Des comparaisons directes ont été menées dans RevMan, les analyses en sous-groupe et l'analyse de sensibilité ont également été réalisées dans SPSS.

Résultats Principaux

Quatre-vingt-six essais ont été inclus dans cette revue mise à jour, avec 77 essais (portant sur plus de 29 000 femmes) fournissant des données sur l'abstinence tabagique en fin de grossesse.

Dans des comparaisons séparées, les interventions d’aide psychologique ont démontré un effet significatif par rapport aux soins habituels (27 études; risque relatif moyen (RR) 1,44; intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95% 1,19 à 1,75) et un effet limité par rapport aux interventions moins intensives (16 études; RR moyen de 1,35, IC à 95% 1,00 à 1,82). Cependant, un effet significatif a été observé uniquement dans les sous-groupes où l’aide psychologique était administrée en association avec d'autres stratégies. Il était difficile de savoir si une quelconque stratégie d’aide psychologique était plus efficace que d'autres (une étude; RR 1,15, IC à 95% 0,86 à 1,53). Dans les études comparant l’aide psychologique à des soins habituels (la plus grande comparaison), il était difficile de savoir si les interventions prévenaient la rechute tabagique chez les femmes ayant arrêté de fumer spontanément en début de grossesse (huit études; RR moyen de 1,06, IC à 95% 0,93 à 1,21). Cependant, un effet notable était observé dans l'abstinence tabagique au bout de zéro à cinq mois après la naissance (10 études; RR moyen 1,76, IC à 95% 1,05 à 2,95), un effet limité au bout de six à 11 mois (six études; RR moyen de 1,33, IC à 95% 1,00 à 1,77) et un effet significatif au bout de 12 à 17 mois (deux études, RR moyenne 2,20, IC à 95% 1,23 à 3,96), mais pas à long terme. Dans d'autres comparaisons, l'effet n'était pas significativement différent de l'absence d'effet pour la plupart des critères de jugement secondaires, mais les échantillons étaient de petite taille.

Les interventions intensives avaient le plus d'effet par rapport à une intervention moins intensive (une étude; RR 3,64, IC à 95% 1,84 à 7,23) et une intervention alternative (une étude; RR 4,05, IC à 95% 1,48 à 11,11).

Les interventions commentées démontraient un effet significatif uniquement par rapport aux soins habituels et fournissaient des mesures de soutien à d'autres stratégies, tels que l’aide psychologique (deux études; RR moyen de 4,39, IC à 95% de 1,89 à 10.21), mais l'effet n'était pas clair par rapport à une intervention moins intensive (deux études; RR moyen de 1,19, IC à 95% 0,45 à 3,12).

L'effet de la formation sanitaire n'était pas clair en comparaison avec les soins habituels (trois études; RR moyen 1,51, IC à 95% 0,64 à 3,59) ou les interventions moins intensives (deux études; RR moyen 1,50, IC à 95% 0,97 à 2,31).

Les interventions de soutien social semblaient plus efficaces lorsqu'elles étaient fournies par des pairs (cinq études; RR moyen de 1,49, IC à 95% 1,01 à 2,19), mais l'effet n'était pas clair dans un unique essai de soutien apporté par le partenaire.

Les effets étaient mitigés lorsque l’intervention sur le tabagisme était fournie parmi des interventions plus vastes pour améliorer la santé maternelle, plutôt que les interventions ciblées uniquement sur le sevrage tabagique.

Les analyses en sous-groupe sur les critères de jugement de toutes les études ont montré que l'intensité des interventions et les comparaisons ont augmenté au fil du temps. Les interventions de plus grande intensité sont plus susceptibles d'avoir un nombre de comparaisons plus élevé. Lorsque il n'y avait aucune différence significative, les essais dans lesquels le groupe témoin recevait les soins habituels avaient le plus d’effets combinés (37 études; RR moyen de 1,34, IC à 95% 1,25 à 1,44), avec des effets plus faibles lorsque le groupe de comparaison avait reçu des interventions moins intensives (30 études; RR moyen 1,20, IC à 95% 1,08 à 1,31), ou d'autres interventions (deux études; RR moyen 1,26, IC à 95% 0,98 à 1,53). Des études plus récentes inclues dans cette mise à jour avaient un effet plus faible (20 études; RR moyen 1,26, IC à 95% 1,00 à 1,59),I2 =3%, par rapport à celles de la précédente version de la revue (50 études; RR moyen 1,50, IC à 95% 1,30 à 1,73). Il y avait des tailles d'effets similaires dans les essais avec une abstinence tabagique validée biochimiquement (49 études; RR moyen de 1,43, IC à 95% 1,22 à 1,67) et ceux avec une abstinence auto-déclarée (20 études; RR moyen de 1,48, IC à 95% 1,17 à 1,87). Il n'y avait aucune différence significative entre les essais appliqués par des chercheurs (études d’efficacité) et ceux appliqués par le personnel effectuant le suivi de la grossesse (études d’efficience). Cependant, l'effet n'était pas clair dans trois essais portant sur des interventions d’aide psychologique où l'intervention était à une échelle organisationnelle (RR moyen 0,96, IC à 95% 0,37 à 2,50). Les effets combinés étaient similaires dans les interventions proposées pour les femmes avec un statut socio-économique faible (44 études; RR moyen de 1,41, IC à 95% 1,19 à 1,66), par rapport à d'autres femmes (26 études; RR moyen de 1,47, IC à 95% 1,21 à 1,79); bien que l'effet n'était pas clair dans les interventions chez les femmes provenant de groupes minoritaires ethniques (cinq études; RR moyen 1,08, IC à 95% 0,83 à 1,40) et de groupes autochtones (deux études; RR moyen 0,40, IC à 95% 0,06 à 2,67). Mais surtout, les critères de jugement regroupés ont démontré une baisse de 18% des accouchements prématurés lorsque les femmes avaient reçu des interventions psychosociales (14 études; RR moyen 0,82, IC à 95% 0,70 à 0,96), de même qu’une baisse des nourrissons nés avec une insuffisance pondérale (14 études; RR moyen 0,82, IC à 95% 0,71 à 0,94). Les interventions psychosociales ne semblaient pas avoir d'effets indésirables et trois études mesuraient une amélioration du bien-être psychologique des femmes.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les interventions psychosociales visant à soutenir les femmes à arrêter de fumer pendant la grossesse peuvent augmenter la proportion de femmes qui arrêtent de fumer en fin de grossesse et réduire les naissances prématurées et les insuffisances pondérales des nourrissons.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions psychosociales pour encourager les femmes à arrêter de fumer pendant la grossesse

Interventions psychosociales pour encourager les femmes à arrêter de fumer pendant la grossesse

Le tabagisme pendant la grossesse accroît le risque de complications pour la mère pendant la grossesse et le bébé pourrait naitre prématuré (avant 37 semaines) et avec une insuffisance pondérale. Le tabagisme pendant la grossesse est relativement courant, bien que la tendance soit en baisse dans les pays à revenu élevé, mais plus fréquente dans les pays à faible et moyen revenu.

La revue a montré que les interventions psychosociales pour encourager les femmes à arrêter de fumer permettait d’accroître le nombre de femmes ayant arrêté de fumer en fin de grossesse et réduisait le nombre d’insuffisance pondérale à la naissance et de naissances prématurées. Les interventions psychosociales ne semblaient pas avoir d'effets indésirables et trois études mesuraient une amélioration du bien-être psychologique des femmes.

La revue inclut 86 essais contrôlés randomisés, avec des données provenant de 77 essais (portant sur plus de 29 000 femmes). Presque toutes les études étaient menées dans les pays à revenu élevé. L'intervention, qui encourageait la plupart des femmes à arrêter de fumer pendant la grossesse, a semblé fournir des mesures incitatives. Cependant, ces critères de jugement sont seulement basés sur quatre essais portant sur un petit nombre de femmes (toutes aux États-Unis) et l’intervention semblait aider les femmes à arrêter de fumer uniquement sous suivi intensif (trois essais). L’aide psychologique paraissait également être efficace pour soutenir les femmes à arrêter de fumer, ceci seulement lorsqu' elle était combinée avec d'autres stratégies (27 essais). L'efficacité de l’aide psychologique était moins évidente lorsque les femmes dans le groupe témoin avaient reçu une intervention tabagique moins intensive (16 essais). Les commentaires semblaient également aider les femmes à arrêter de fumer, mais seulement lorsqu’ils étaient comparés avec les soins habituels et associés à d'autres stratégies (deux études). Il était difficile de savoir si la formation sanitaire seule aidait les femmes à arrêter de fumer, le nombre de femmes impliquées dans ces essais étant relativement faible. Les preuves de soutien social étaient contrastées; par exemple, l'entraide ciblée semblait aider les femmes à arrêter (cinq essais), mais dans un essai, le soutien des partenaires n'aidait pas. Les femmes ont également rapporté que l’entraide et le soutien des partenaires pourraient être à la fois utiles et inutiles.

Une hausse de la fréquence et de la durée de l'intervention ne semblait pas augmenter l'efficacité. Les interventions semblaient être aussi efficaces pour les femmes à faible revenu, que celles qui ne l'étaient pas; mais il n'existe pas suffisamment de preuves pour démontrer que les interventions étaient efficaces pour les femmes de groupes ethniques (cinq essais) et autochtones (deux essais). Les essais, dans lesquels les interventions sont devenues routinières dans le cadre des soins pendant la grossesse, ne semblaient pas aider davantage de femmes à arrêter de fumer, ce qui suggère qu’il existe des défis pour appliquer ces preuves dans la pratique.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 14th January, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Minist�re en charge de la Sant�