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Intervention Review

Hands/knees posture in late pregnancy or labour for fetal malposition (lateral or posterior)

  1. GJ Hofmeyr Director/Hon. Professor, Effective Care Research Unit*,
  2. R Kulier

Editorial Group: Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group

Published Online: 26 JAN 1998

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001063


How to Cite

Hofmeyr GJ, Kulier R. Hands/knees posture in late pregnancy or labour for fetal malposition (lateral or posterior). The Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 1998, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD001063. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001063.

Author Information

  1. University of the Witwatersrand, University of Fort Hare, Eastern Cape Department of Health, East London, Eastern Cape, SOUTH AFRICA

*GJ Hofmeyr, Director/Hon. Professor, Effective Care Research Unit, University of the Witwatersrand, University of Fort Hare, Eastern Cape Department of Health, Frere and Cecilia Makiwane Hospitals, Private Bag X 9047, East London, Eastern Cape, 5200, SOUTH AFRICA. gjh@global.co.za.

Publication History

  1. Published Online: 26 JAN 1998

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Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Synopsis

Background

Lateral and posterior position of the fetal presenting parts may be associated with more painful, prolonged or obstructed labour and difficult delivery. It is possible that maternal posture may influence fetal position.

Objectives

The objective of this review is to assess the effects of adopting a hands and knees maternal posture in late pregnancy when the presenting part of the fetus is in a lateral or posterior position.

Search strategy

We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group trials register and the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register. Date of last search: October 2001.

Selection criteria

Randomised trials of hands and knees maternal posture compared to other postures.

Data collection and analysis

Both reviewers assessed trial eligibility and quality.

Main results

One trial involving 100 women was included. Four different postures (four groups of 20 women) were combined for the comparison with the control group of 20 women. Lateral or posterior position of the presenting part of the fetus was less likely to persist following 10 minutes in the hands and knees position compared to a sitting position (relative risk 0.25, 95% confidence interval 0.17 to 0.37).

Authors' conclusions

Hands and knees maternal posture for lateral or posterior fetal presentation appears to result in short term effects on fetal position. No other perinatal or maternal outcomes were reported. There is not enough evidence to evaluate the effectiveness of a hands and knees maternal posture when the fetal presenting part is lateral or posterior, on clinically important outcomes.

 

Synopsis

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  2. Abstract
  3. Synopsis

Synopsis

Synopsis pending.