Intervention Review

Interventions for preventing lower limb soft-tissue running injuries

  1. Simon S Yeung1,*,
  2. Ella W Yeung1,
  3. Lesley D Gillespie2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group

Published Online: 6 JUL 2011

Assessed as up-to-date: 16 APR 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001256.pub2


How to Cite

Yeung SS, Yeung EW, Gillespie LD. Interventions for preventing lower limb soft-tissue running injuries. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 7. Art. No.: CD001256. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001256.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Hong Kong, China

  2. 2

    University of Otago, Department of Medicine, Dunedin School of Medicine, Dunedin, Otago, New Zealand

*Simon S Yeung, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hung Hom, Kowloon, Hong Kong, China. simon.yeung@inet.polyu.edu.hk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions), comment added to review
  2. Published Online: 6 JUL 2011

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Background

Overuse soft-tissue injuries occur frequently in runners. Stretching exercises, modification of training schedules, and the use of protective devices such as braces and insoles are often advocated for prevention. This is an update of a review first published in 2001.

Objectives

To assess the effects of interventions for preventing lower limb soft-tissue running injuries.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register (March 2011); The Cochrane Library 2010, Issue 4; MEDLINE (1966 to January 2011); EMBASE (1980 to January 2011); and international trial registries (17 January 2011).

Selection criteria

Randomised or quasi-randomised trials evaluating interventions to prevent lower limb soft-tissue running injuries.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently assessed risk of bias (relating to sequence generation, allocation concealment, blinding, incomplete outcome data) and extracted data. Data were adjusted for clustering if necessary and pooled using the fixed-effect model when appropriate.

Main results

We included 25 trials (30,252 participants). Participants were military recruits (19 trials), runners from the general population (three trials), soccer referees (one trial), and prisoners (two trials). The interventions tested in the included trials fell into four main preventive strategies: exercises, modification of training schedules, use of orthoses, and footwear and socks. All 25 included trials were judged as 'unclear' or 'high' risk of bias for at least one of the four domains listed above.

We found no evidence that stretching reduces lower limb soft-tissue injuries (6 trials; 5130 participants; risk ratio [RR] 0.85, 95% confidence interval [95% CI] 0.65 to 1.12). As with all non-significant results, this is compatible with either a reduction or an increase in soft-tissue injuries. We found no evidence to support a training regimen of conditioning exercises to improve strength, flexibility and coordination (one trial; 1020 participants; RR 1.20, 95% CI 0.77 to 1.87).

We found no evidence that a longer, more gradual increase in training reduces injuries in novice runners (one trial; 486 participants; RR 1.02, 95% CI 0.72 to 1.45). There was some evidence from a poor quality trial that additional training resulted in a significant increase in the number of naval recruits with shin splints (one trial; 1670 participants; RR 2.02, 95% CI 1.11 to 3.70). There was limited evidence that injuries were less frequent in prisoners when running duration (one trial; 69 participants; RR 0.41, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.79) or frequency (one trial; 58 participants; RR 0.19, 95% CI 0.06 to 0.66) were reduced.

Patellofemoral braces appear to be effective for preventing anterior knee pain (two trials; 227 participants; RR 0.41, 95% CI 0.24 to 0.67).

Custom-made biomechanical insoles may be more effective than no insoles for reducing shin splints (medial tibial stress syndrome) in military recruits (one trial; 146 participants; RR 0.24, 95% CI 0.08 to 0.69).

We found no evidence in military recruits that wearing running shoes based on foot shape, rather than standard running shoes, significantly reduced rate of running injuries (2 trials; 5795 participants; Rate Ratio 1.03, 95% CI 0.93 to 1.14).

Authors' conclusions

Overall, the evidence base for the effectiveness of interventions to reduce soft-tissue injury after intensive running is very weak, with few trials at low risk of bias. More well-designed and reported RCTs are needed that test interventions in recreational and competitive runners.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Interventions for preventing lower limb soft-tissue injuries in runners

Lower limb soft-tissue injuries are common in runners. Most running-related injuries are overuse injuries and the causes of these injuries are often multifactorial. Prevention strategies attempt to target modifiable risk factors. We included 25 trials with 30,252 participants in this review. Only three of the trials recruited runners from the general population, and one recruited soccer referees. Nineteen trials involved service personnel (Army, Marines, Naval personnel etc) undertaking basic training which includes intensive periods of running, along with other activities. Two trials were conducted in prisons.

The included trials tested four categories of interventions: exercises, modification of training schedules, use of orthoses, and footwear and socks.

In the following results, where there is "no evidence" that an intervention worked, the results were compatible with either a reduction or an increase in the number of soft-tissue injuries.

There is no evidence that improving physical attributes by exercises (stretching or conditioning exercises) reduces lower limb soft-tissue injuries.

With regards to the modification of training schedules, there is no evidence that a longer training programme with a gradual increase in the amount of running is more effective than a shorter training programme for preventing injuries in novice runners training for a four-mile recreational run. Having a longer build-up in training intensity may even result in an increase in sore shins in people undergoing military training. There is limited evidence from two poor quality trials conducted in prisons for the effectiveness of decreased frequency or duration of running but these results may not apply to runners in general, or military recruits.

Knee braces may reduce the frequency of anterior knee pain. Custom-made biomechanical insoles may be more effective than no insoles for reducing shin splints (medial tibial stress syndrome) in military recruits. There is no evidence to support the use of shoe insoles for the reduction of other lower limb soft-tissue injuries, whether they are individually prescribed to suit foot shape or off-the-shelf.

There is no evidence that running shoes prescribed to suit individual foot shape are better than standard running shoes for preventing injuries in military recruits.

Overall, the evidence for the effectiveness of interventions to reduce lower-limb pain and injury after intensive running is very weak. More trials, designed, conducted and reported to contemporary standards, would be required to confirm these findings, especially in recreational or competitive runners, rather than military recruits.

 

Resumen

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Antecedentes

Intervenciones para prevenir lesiones de los tejidos blandos de miembros inferiores durante el trote

Las lesiones de tejidos blandos por uso excesivo ocurren con frecuencia en los corredores. A menudo se recomienda como prevención los ejercicios de elongación, la modificación de los esquemas de entrenamiento y el uso de dispositivos protectores como rodilleras y plantillas. Ésta es una actualización de una revisión publicada por primera vez en 2001.

Objetivos

Evaluar los efectos de las intervenciones para la prevención de lesiones de los tejidos blandos de miembros inferiores durante el trote.

Estrategia de búsqueda

Se hicieron búsquedas en el registro especializado del Grupo Cochrane de Lesiones Óseas, Articulares y Musculares (Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group) (marzo 2011); The Cochrane Library 2010, número 4; MEDLINE (1966 hasta enero 2011); EMBASE (1980 hasta enero 2011); y en registros internacionales de ensayos (17 enero 2011).

Criterios de selección

Ensayos aleatorios o cuasialeatorios que evaluaban intervenciones para prevenir lesiones de los tejidos blandos de miembros inferiores durante el trote.

Obtención y análisis de los datos

Dos revisores evaluaron de forma independiente el riesgo de sesgo (en relación con la generación de la secuencia, la ocultación de la asignación, el cegamiento, los datos de resultado incompletos) y extrajeron los datos. Los datos se adaptaron para la asignación por grupos y se agruparon mediante un modelo de efectos fijos cuando fue apropiado.

Resultados principales

Se incluyeron 25 ensayos (30 252 participantes). Los participantes eran reclutas militares (19 ensayos), corredores de la población general (tres ensayos), árbitros de fútbol (un ensayo) y prisioneros (dos ensayos). Las comparaciones evaluadas en los ensayos incluidos pueden dividirse en cuatro grandes estrategias de prevención: ejercicios, modificación de los esquemas de entrenamiento, uso de ortesis, y calzado y calcetines. Los 25 ensayos incluidos recibieron la calificación de riesgo de sesgo “incierto” o “alto” en al menos uno de los cuatro dominios enumerados anteriormente.

No se hallaron pruebas de que la elongación reduzca las lesiones de los tejidos blandos de miembros inferiores (6 ensayos; 5130 participantes; cociente de riesgos [CR] 0,85; intervalo de confianza [IC] del 95%: 0,65 a 1,12). Al igual que en todos los resultados no significativos, esta cifra es compatible tanto con una reducción como con un aumento de las lesiones de tejidos blandos. No se hallaron pruebas que apoyen un régimen de entrenamiento de ejercicios de acondicionamiento para mejorar la fuerza, la flexibilidad y la coordinación (un ensayo; 1020 participantes; CR 1,20; IC del 95%: 0,77 a 1,87).

No se hallaron pruebas de que un aumento más gradual, más prolongado, del entrenamiento reduzca las lesiones en los corredores principiantes (un ensayo; 486 participantes; CR 1,02; IC del 95%: 0,72 a 1,45). Un ensayo de calidad deficiente aportó algunas pruebas de que el entrenamiento adicional dio lugar a un aumento significativo del número de reclutas navales que presentó síndrome de estrés medial de la tibia (un ensayo; 1670 participantes; CR 2,02; IC del 95%: 1,11 a 3,70). Se encontraron pruebas limitadas de que las lesiones fueron menos frecuentes en los prisioneros cuando se redujo la duración (un ensayo; 69 participantes; RR 0,41; IC del 95%: 0,21 a 0,79) o la frecuencia del trote (un ensayo; 58 participantes; RR 0,19; IC del 95%: 0,06 a 0,66).

Las rodilleras femororrotulianas parecen ser efectivas para prevenir el dolor anterior de rodilla (dos ensayos; 227 participantes; CR 0,41; IC del 95%: 0,24 a 0,67).

Las plantillas biomecánicas hechas a medida pueden ser más efectivas que ninguna plantilla para reducir la periostitis tibial (síndrome de estrés medial de la tibia) en los reclutas militares (un ensayo; 146 participantes; CR 0,24; IC del 95%: 0,08 a 0,69).

No se hallaron pruebas en los reclutas militares de que el uso de calzado para correr basado en la forma del pie, en lugar de calzado para correr estándar, reduzca de manera significativa la tasa de lesiones durante el trote (2 ensayos; 5795 participantes; proporción de la tasa: 1,03; IC del 95%: 0,93 a 1,14).

Conclusiones de los autores

En términos generales, la base de pruebas sobre la efectividad de las intervenciones para reducir las lesiones de tejidos blandos después del trote intensivo es muy débil, con pocos ensayos con bajo riesgo de sesgo. Se necesitan más ECA, bien diseñados y notificados, que evalúen intervenciones en corredores recreativos y competitivos.

Traducción

Traducción realizada por el Centro Cochrane Iberoamericano

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Interventions pour la prévention des lésions des tissus mous des membres inférieurs liées à la course

Contexte

Les coureurs sont souvent victimes de lésions de surmenage des tissus mous. Les exercices d'étirement, la modification des programmes d'entraînement et l'utilisation d'équipements de protection tels que des attelles et des semelles sont souvent recommandés pour prévenir ces lésions. Ceci est une mise à jour d'une revue publiée pour la première fois en 2001.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets des interventions visant à prévenir les lésions des tissus mous des membres inférieurs liées à la course.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons consulté le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les traumatismes ostéo-articulaires et musculaires (mars 2011) ; la Bibliothèque Cochrane 2010, numéro 4 ; MEDLINE (1966 à janvier 2011) ; EMBASE (1980 à janvier 2011) ; et les registres d’essais cliniques internationaux (17 janvier 2011).

Critères de sélection

Les essais randomisés ou quasi-randomisés évaluant des interventions visant à prévenir les lésions des tissus mous des membres inférieurs liées à la course.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont évalué le risque de biais (génération de séquence, assignation secrète, assignation en aveugle et données de résultats incomplètes) et extrait les données de manière indépendante. Les données ont été ajustées pour la randomisation en grappes si nécessaire, et ont été combinées à l'aide du modèle à effets fixes lorsque cela était approprié.

Résultats Principaux

25 essais portant sur 30 252 participants ont été inclus). Les participants étaient des recrues militaires (19 essais), des coureurs issus de la population générale (trois essais), des arbitres de football (un essai) et des prisonniers (deux essais). Les interventions examinées dans les essais inclus appartenaient à quatre grandes stratégies préventives : des exercices, une modification des programmes d'entraînement, l'utilisation d'orthèses et l'utilisation de chaussures et de chaussettes. Les 25 essais inclus présentaient un risque de biais indéterminé ou élevé pour au moins l'un des quatre domaines précédemment mentionnés.

Nous n'avons identifié aucune preuve indiquant que les étirements permettaient de réduire les lésions des tissus mous des membres inférieurs (6 essais ; 5130 participants ; risque relatif [RR] de 0,85, intervalle de confiance à 95 % [IC à 95 %], entre 0,65 et 1,12). Comme pour tous les résultats non significatifs, ce résultat est compatible avec une réduction ou une augmentation des lésions des tissus mous. Nous n'avons identifié aucune preuve permettant de recommander un régime d'entraînement à base d'exercices de conditionnement pour améliorer la force, la flexibilité et la coordination (un essai ; 1020 participants ; RR 1,20, IC à 95 % entre 0,77 et 1,87).

Nous n'avons identifié aucune preuve indiquant qu'une augmentation plus lente et progressive de l'entraînement réduisait les lésions chez les coureurs débutants (un essai ; 486 participants ; RR 1,02, IC à 95 % entre 0,72 et 1,45). Certaines preuves issues d'un essai de faible qualité indiquaient qu'un entraînement supplémentaire entraînait une augmentation significative du nombre de recrues navales souffrant de périostose (un essai ; 1670 participants ; RR 2,02, IC à 95 % entre 1,11 et 3,70). Des preuves limitées indiquaient que les lésions étaient moins fréquentes chez les prisonniers lorsque la durée (un essai ; 69 participants ; RR de 0,41, IC à 95 %, entre 0,21 et 0,79) ou la fréquence de la course (un essai ; 58 participants ; RR de 0,19, IC à 95 %, entre 0,06 et 0,66) étaient réduites.

Les attelles fémoro-patellaires semblent efficaces pour prévenir les douleurs antérieures du genou (deux essais ; 227 participants ; RR 0,41, IC à 95 % entre 0,24 et 0,67).

Les semelles biomécaniques sur mesure pourraient être plus efficaces que l'absence de semelles pour réduire la périostose (syndrome du stress tibial) chez des recrues militaires (un essai ; 146 participants ; RR 0,24, IC à 95 % entre 0,08 et 0,69).

Nous n'avons identifié aucune preuve indiquant que le port de chaussures de course adaptées à la forme du pied plutôt que de chaussures de course standard entraînait une réduction significative du taux de lésions dues à la course chez les recrues militaires (2 essais ; 5795 participants ; rapport des taux de 1,03, IC à 95 %, entre 0,93 et 1,14).

Conclusions des auteurs

Dans l'ensemble, la base factuelle est très faible concernant l'efficacité des interventions visant à réduire les lésions des tissus mous après une course intensive, et peu d'essais sont associés à un faible risque de biais. Des ECR mieux planifiés et documentés sont nécessaires afin d'évaluer des interventions portant sur des coureurs amateurs et de compétition.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Interventions pour la prévention des lésions des tissus mous des membres inférieurs liées à la course

Interventions pour la prévention des lésions des tissus mous des membres inférieurs chez les coureurs

Les lésions des tissus mous des membres inférieurs sont courantes chez les coureurs. La plupart des lésions liées à la course sont des blessures de surmenage dont les causes sont souvent multifactorielles. Les stratégies de prévention tentent de cibler les facteurs de risque modifiables. 25 essais portant sur un total de 30 252 participants ont été inclus dans cette revue. Trois essais seulement recrutaient des coureurs issus de la population générale, et un essai recrutait des arbitres de football. Dix-neuf essais portaient sur du personnel militaire (armée, marine, etc.) soumis à un entraînement de base incluant des périodes intensives de course à pied ainsi que d'autres activités. Deux essais avaient été réalisés dans des prisons.

Les essais inclus examinaient quatre catégories d'interventions : des exercices, une modification des programmes d'entraînement, l'utilisation d'orthèses et l'utilisation de chaussures et de chaussettes.

Dans le compte-rendu suivant, lorsqu'il n'existait aucune preuve d'efficacité d'une intervention, les résultats étaient compatibles avec une réduction ou une augmentation du nombre de lésions des tissus mous.

Aucune preuve n'indique que l'amélioration des capacités physiques par l'exercice (étirements ou exercices de conditionnement) réduisait les lésions des tissus mous des membres inférieurs.

Concernant la modification des programmes d'entraînement, aucune preuve n'indique qu'un programme d'entraînement plus long avec augmentation progressive de l'intensité de la course était plus efficace qu'un programme plus court pour prévenir les lésions chez des coureurs débutants s'entraînant pour une course récréative de 6,4 km. Une augmentation plus progressive de l'intensité de l'entraînement pourrait même entraîner une augmentation des douleurs au tibia chez les participants suivant un entraînement militaire. Il existe des preuves limitées issues de deux essais de faible qualité réalisés dans des prisons concernant l'efficacité d'une réduction de la fréquence ou de la durée de la course, mais ces résultats pourraient ne pas s'appliquer aux coureurs en général ou aux recrues militaires.

Les attelles de genou pourraient réduire la fréquence des douleurs antérieures du genou. Les semelles biomécaniques sur mesure pourraient être plus efficaces que l'absence de semelles pour réduire la périostose (syndrome du stress tibial) chez les recrues militaires. Aucune preuve ne permet de recommander l'utilisation de semelles pour réduire les autres lésions des tissus mous des membres inférieurs, qu'il s'agisse de semelles génériques ou fabriquées sur mesure.

Aucune preuve n'indique que les chaussures de course adaptées à la forme du pied sont plus efficaces que les chaussures de course standard pour prévenir les lésions chez les recrues militaires.

Globalement, les preuves d'efficacité des interventions visant à réduire les douleurs et les lésions des membres inférieurs après une course intensive sont très faibles. D'autres essais conçus, réalisés et documentés conformément aux normes actuelles sont nécessaires pour confirmer ces résultats, en particulier chez les coureurs amateurs ou de compétition, plutôt que chez les recrues militaires.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st July, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.