Intervention Review

Substitution of doctors by nurses in primary care

  1. Miranda Laurant1,*,
  2. David Reeves2,
  3. Rosella Hermens1,
  4. Jose Braspenning1,
  5. Richard Grol1,
  6. Bonnie Sibbald3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group

Published Online: 20 APR 2005

Assessed as up-to-date: 16 JUL 2004

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001271.pub2


How to Cite

Laurant M, Reeves D, Hermens R, Braspenning J, Grol R, Sibbald B. Substitution of doctors by nurses in primary care. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2005, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD001271. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001271.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, Scientific Institute for Quality of Health Care, Nijmegen, Netherlands

  2. 2

    University of Manchester, National Primary care Research and Development Centre, Manchester, UK

  3. 3

    NPCRDC, 5th Floor, Williamson Building, Health Service Research, Manchester, UK

*Miranda Laurant, Scientific Institute for Quality of Health Care, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Center, PO Box 9101, 114 IQ Health Care, Nijmegen, 6500 HB, Netherlands. M.Laurant@iq.umcn.nl.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 20 APR 2005

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Резюме на простом языке

Background

Demand for primary care services has increased in developed countries due to population ageing, rising patient expectations, and reforms that shift care from hospitals to the community. At the same time, the supply of physicians is constrained and there is increasing pressure to contain costs. Shifting care from physicians to nurses is one possible response to these challenges. The expectation is that nurse-doctor substitution will reduce cost and physician workload while maintaining quality of care.

Objectives

Our aim was to evaluate the impact of doctor-nurse substitution in primary care on patient outcomes, process of care, and resource utilisation including cost. Patient outcomes included: morbidity; mortality; satisfaction; compliance; and preference. Process of care outcomes included: practitioner adherence to clinical guidelines; standards or quality of care; and practitioner health care activity (e.g. provision of advice). Resource utilisation was assessed by: frequency and length of consultations; return visits; prescriptions; tests and investigations; referral to other services; and direct or indirect costs.

Search methods

The following databases were searched for the period 1966 to 2002: Medline; Cinahl; Bids, Embase; Social Science Citation Index; British Nursing Index; HMIC; EPOC Register; and Cochrane Controlled Trial Register. Search terms specified the setting (primary care), professional (nurse), study design (randomised controlled trial, controlled before-and-after-study, interrupted time series), and subject (e.g. skill mix).

The searches for this review were conducted in 2002 and are now out-of-date and therefore the review findings should be used with caution. The review is currently being updated and the updated version should be published before the end of 2014.

Selection criteria

Studies were included if nurses were compared to doctors providing a similar primary health care service (excluding accident and emergency services). Primary care doctors included: general practitioners, family physicians, paediatricians, general internists or geriatricians. Primary care nurses included: practice nurses, nurse practitioners, clinical nurse specialists, or advanced practice nurses.

Data collection and analysis

Study selection and data extraction was conducted independently by two reviewers with differences resolved through discussion. Meta-analysis was applied to outcomes for which there was adequate reporting of intervention effects from at least three randomised controlled trials. Semi-quantitative methods were used to synthesize other outcomes.

Main results

4253 articles were screened of which 25 articles, relating to 16 studies, met our inclusion criteria. In seven studies the nurse assumed responsibility for first contact and ongoing care for all presenting patients. The outcomes investigated varied across studies so limiting the opportunity for data synthesis. In general, no appreciable differences were found between doctors and nurses in health outcomes for patients, process of care, resource utilisation or cost.

In five studies the nurse assumed responsibility for first contact care for patients wanting urgent consultations during office hours or out-of-hours. Patient health outcomes were similar for nurses and doctors but patient satisfaction was higher with nurse-led care. Nurses tended to provide longer consultations, give more information to patients and recall patients more frequently than did doctors. The impact on physician workload and direct cost of care was variable.

In four studies the nurse took responsibility for the ongoing management of patients with particular chronic conditions. The outcomes investigated varied across studies so limiting the opportunity for data synthesis. In general, no appreciable differences were found between doctors and nurses in health outcomes for patients, process of care, resource utilisation or cost.

Authors' conclusions

The findings suggest that appropriately trained nurses can produce as high quality care as primary care doctors and achieve as good health outcomes for patients. However, this conclusion should be viewed with caution given that only one study was powered to assess equivalence of care, many studies had methodological limitations, and patient follow-up was generally 12 months or less.

While doctor-nurse substitution has the potential to reduce doctors' workload and direct healthcare costs, achieving such reductions depends on the particular context of care. Doctors' workload may remain unchanged either because nurses are deployed to meet previously unmet patient need or because nurses generate demand for care where previously there was none. Savings in cost depend on the magnitude of the salary differential between doctors and nurses, and may be offset by the lower productivity of nurses compared to doctors.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Резюме на простом языке

In primary care, it appears that appropriately trained nurses can produce as high quality care and achieve as good health outcomes for patients as doctors. However, the research available is quite limited.

Many countries have sought to shift the provision of primary care from doctors to nurses in order to reduce the demand for doctors and improve healthcare efficiency. The expectation is that nurses working as substitutes can provide as high quality care as doctors at lower cost. This review found that quality of care is similar for nurses and doctors but it is not known if it decreases the doctor's workload. Nurses tend to provide more health advice and achieve higher levels of patient satisfaction compared with doctors. Even though using nurses may save salary costs, nurses may order more tests and use other services which may decrease the cost savings of using nurses instead of doctors.

The searches for this review were conducted in 2002. The review findings are therefore out-of-date and should be used with caution. The review is currently being updated and the updated version should be published before the end of 2014.

 

Резюме на простом языке

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Резюме на простом языке

Оказывается, что в первичной помощи соответствующим образом обученные медсестры могут оказывать помощь столь же высокого качества и достигать таких же хороших результатов в отношении здоровья пациентов, как и врачи. Однако, имеющиеся исследования на эту тему весьма ограничены.

Во многих странах стремятся переложить предоставление первичной помощи с врачей на медсестер, с тем чтобы уменьшить потребность во врачах и повысить эффективность здравоохранения. Ожидается, что медсестры, работающие в качестве заменителей врачей могут обеспечивать такую же высококачественную помощь, как и врачи при более низкой стоимости. Этот обзор обнаружил, что качество медицинской помощи одинаково у медсестер и врачей, но не известно, уменьшает ли это рабочую нагрузку врача. Медсестры, как правило, обеспечивают больше медицинских консультаций и достигают более высоких уровней удовлетворенности пациентов по сравнению с врачами. Даже при том, что с помощью медсестер можно сохранить расходы на заработную плату, медсестры могут заказывать дополнительные тесты и пользоваться другими услугами, что может уменьшить экономию от использования медсестер вместо врачей.

Поиск литературы для этого обзора был проведён в 2002 году. Следовательно, результаты обзора устарели и их следует использовать с осторожностью. Обзор в настоящее время обновляется и обновленная версия должна быть опубликована до конца 2014 года.

Заметки по переводу

Перевод: Зиганшина Лилия Евгеньевна. Редактирование: Абакумова Татьяна Рудольфовна. Координация проекта по переводу на русский язык: Казанский федеральный университет. По вопросам, связанным с этим переводом, пожалуйста, свяжитесь с нами по адресу: lezign@gmail.com

Перевод, опубликованный он-лайн: 2014/4/30