Intervention Review

Cranberries for preventing urinary tract infections

  1. Ruth G Jepson1,*,
  2. Gabrielle Williams2,
  3. Jonathan C Craig3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Renal Group

Published Online: 17 OCT 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 10 SEP 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001321.pub5

How to Cite

Jepson RG, Williams G, Craig JC. Cranberries for preventing urinary tract infections. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 10. Art. No.: CD001321. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001321.pub5.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Stirling, Department of Nursing and Midwifery, Stirling, Scotland, UK

  2. 2

    The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Centre for Kidney Research, Westmead, NSW, Australia

  3. 3

    The Children's Hospital at Westmead, Cochrane Renal Group, Centre for Kidney Research, Westmead, NSW, Australia

*Ruth G Jepson, Department of Nursing and Midwifery, University of Stirling, Stirling, Scotland, FK9 4LA, UK. ruth.jepson@stir.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 17 OCT 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Abstract
  5. Plain language summary

Background

Cranberries have been used widely for several decades for the prevention and treatment of urinary tract infections (UTIs). This is the third update of our review first published in 1998 and updated in 2004 and 2008.

Objectives

To assess the effectiveness of cranberry products in preventing UTIs in susceptible populations.

Search methods

We searched MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library) and the Internet. We contacted companies involved with the promotion and distribution of cranberry preparations and checked reference lists of review articles and relevant studies.

Date of search: July 2012

Selection criteria

All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or quasi-RCTs of cranberry products for the prevention of UTIs.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently assessed and extracted data. Information was collected on methods, participants, interventions and outcomes (incidence of symptomatic UTIs, positive culture results, side effects, adherence to therapy). Risk ratios (RR) were calculated where appropriate, otherwise a narrative synthesis was undertaken. Quality was assessed using the Cochrane risk of bias assessment tool.

Main results

This updated review includes a total of 24 studies (six cross-over studies, 11 parallel group studies with two arms; five with three arms, and two studies with a factorial design) with a total of 4473 participants. Ten studies were included in the 2008 update, and 14 studies have been added to this update. Thirteen studies (2380 participants) evaluated only cranberry juice/concentrate; nine studies (1032 participants) evaluated only cranberry tablets/capsules; one study compared cranberry juice and tablets; and one study compared cranberry capsules and tablets. The comparison/control arms were placebo, no treatment, water, methenamine hippurate, antibiotics, or lactobacillus. Eleven studies were not included in the meta-analyses because either the design was a cross-over study and data were not reported separately for the first phase, or there was a lack of relevant data. Data included in the meta-analyses showed that, compared with placebo, water or not treatment, cranberry products did not significantly reduce the occurrence of symptomatic UTI overall (RR 0.86, 95% CI 0.71 to 1.04) or for any the subgroups: women with recurrent UTIs (RR 0.74, 95% CI 0.42 to 1.31); older people (RR 0.75, 95% CI 0.39 to 1.44); pregnant women (RR 1.04, 95% CI 0.97 to 1.17); children with recurrent UTI (RR 0.48, 95% CI 0.19 to 1.22); cancer patients (RR 1.15 95% CI 0.75 to 1.77); or people with neuropathic bladder or spinal injury (RR 0.95, 95% CI: 0.75 to 1.20). Overall heterogeneity was moderate (I² = 55%). The effectiveness of cranberry was not significantly different to antibiotics for women (RR 1.31, 95% CI 0.85, 2.02) and children (RR 0.69 95% CI 0.32 to 1.51). There was no significant difference between gastrointestinal adverse effects from cranberry product compared to those of placebo/no treatment (RR 0.83, 95% CI 0.31 to 2.27). Many studies reported low compliance and high withdrawal/dropout problems which they attributed to palatability/acceptability of the products, primarily the cranberry juice. Most studies of other cranberry products (tablets and capsules) did not report how much of the 'active' ingredient the product contained, and therefore the products may not have had enough potency to be effective.

Authors' conclusions

Prior to the current update it appeared there was some evidence that cranberry juice may decrease the number of symptomatic UTIs over a 12 month period, particularly for women with recurrent UTIs. The addition of 14 further studies suggests that cranberry juice is less effective than previously indicated. Although some of small studies demonstrated a small benefit for women with recurrent UTIs, there were no statistically significant differences when the results of a much larger study were included. Cranberry products were not significantly different to antibiotics for preventing UTIs in three small studies. Given the large number of dropouts/withdrawals from studies (mainly attributed to the acceptability of consuming cranberry products particularly juice, over long periods), and the evidence that the benefit for preventing UTI is small, cranberry juice cannot currently be recommended for the prevention of UTIs. Other preparations (such as powders) need to be quantified using standardised methods to ensure the potency, and contain enough of the 'active' ingredient, before being evaluated in clinical studies or recommended for use.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Abstract
  5. Plain language summary

Cranberries for preventing urinary tract infections

Cranberries (usually as cranberry juice) have been used to prevent urinary tract infections (UTIs). Cranberries contain a substance that can prevent bacteria from sticking on the walls of the bladder. This may help prevent bladder and other UTIs. This review identified 24 studies (4473 participants) comparing cranberry products with control or alternative treatments. There was a small trend towards fewer UTIs in people taking cranberry product compared to placebo or no treatment but this was not a significant finding. Many people in the studies stopped drinking the juice, suggesting it may not be a acceptable intervention. Cranberry juice does not appear to have a significant benefit in preventing UTIs and may be unacceptable to consume in the long term. Cranberry products (such as tablets or capsules) were also ineffective (although had the same effect as taking antibiotics), possibly due to lack of potency of the 'active ingredient'.

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Abstract
  5. Plain language summary

Cranberries para a prevenção de infecções do trato urinário

Background

A fruta cranberry tem sido amplamente usada há várias décadas para a prevenção e tratamento de infecções do trato urinário (ITU) . Esta é a terceira atualização de nossa revisão, publicada pela primeira vez em 1998 e atualizada em 2004 e 2008.

Objectives

Avaliar a efetividade de produtos de cranberry na prevenção de ITUs em populações suscetíveis.

Search methods

Foi realizada uma busca no MEDLINE, EMBASE, no Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL na The Cochrane Library) e na Internet. Entrou-se em contato com empresas envolvidas com a promoção e distribuição de concentrados de cranberry e foram avaliadas as listas de referências de artigos de revisão e dos estudos relevantes.

Data da busca: Julho de 2012.

Selection criteria

Todos os Ensaios Clínicos Randomizados (ECR) ou quasi-randomizados que avaliaram o uso de produtos derivados de cranberry para a prevenção de UTIs.

Data collection and analysis

Dois autores avaliaram e extraíram os dados de forma independente. Foram coletadas informações sobre os métodos, os participantes, as intervenções e os desfechos (incidência de UTIs sintomáticas, resultados positivos das culturas, efeitos colaterais, e aderência à terapia). Os Riscos Relativos (RR) foram calculados quando isso era apropriado; nos outros casos foi feita uma síntese narrativa dos estudos. A qualidade dos estudos foi avaliada utilizando o instrumento de avaliação de risco de viés da Cochrane.

Main results

Essa revisão atualizada incluiu um total de 24 estudos (seis estudos cross-over, 11 estudos de grupo paralelo com dois braços; cinco com três braços, e dois estudos com um desenho fatorial) com 4473 participantes no total. Dez estudos foram incluídos na atualização de 2008, e 14 estudos foram acrescentados nesta última atualização. Treze estudos (2380 participantes) avaliaram somente o suco/concentrado de cranberry; nove estudos (1032 participantes) avaliaram somente pastilhas/cápsulas de cranberry; um estudo comparou suco e pastilhas de cranberry; e um estudo comparou cápsulas e pastilhas de cranberry. Os braços de comparação/controle eram placebo, nenhum tratamento, água, hipurato de metenamina, antibióticos, ou lactobacilos. Onze estudos não foram incluídos na meta-análise porque o desenho era cross-over e os dados não foram descritos separadamente para a primeira fase, ou porque faltaram dados relevantes. Os dados incluídos na meta-análise mostraram que, em comparação com o placebo, água ou nenhum tratamento, os produtos de cranberry não reduziram significativamente a ocorrência geral de UTI sintomática (RR 0.86, 95% IC 0.71 – 1.04) ) ou para quaisquer dos subgrupos estudados: mulheres com UTIs recorrentes (RR 0.74, 95% IC 0.42 – 1.31); pessoas idosas (RR 0.75, 95% IC 0.39 – 1.44); mulheres grávidas (RR 1.04, 95% IC 0.97 – 1.17); crianças com UTIs recorrentes (RR 0.48, 95% IC 0.19 – 1.22); pacientes de câncer (RR 1.15, 95% IC 0.75 – 1.77); ou pessoas com bexiga neurogênica ou lesão medular (RR 0.95, 95% IC, 0.75 – 1.20). A heterogeneidade geral foi moderada (I2 = 55%). A efetividade da cranberry não foi significantemente diferente dos antibióticos em mulheres (RR 1.31, 95% IC, 0.85 -2.02) e em crianças (RR 0.69, 95% IC 0.32 – 1.51). Também não houve diferença significativa na ocorrência de efeitos adversos gastrointestinais nos participantes que usaram produtos de cranberry comparados com aqueles que usaram placebo / nenhum tratamento (RR de 0,83, IC de 95% 0,31-2,27). Muitos estudos relataram uma baixa taxa de aderência e altas taxas de abandono/desistência que foram atribuídas ao sabor/aceitabilidade dos produtos, especialmente ao suco de cranberry. A maioria dos estudos com pastilhas ou cápsulas de cranberry não informaram qual era a concentração do princípio ativo presente, portanto é possível que esses produtos não tivessem uma concentração suficiente da substância para serem eficazes.

Authors' conclusions

Antes da atual atualização parecia existir alguma evidência de que o suco de cranberry poderia diminuir o número de ITUs sintomáticas ao longo de um período de 12 meses, especialmente para mulheres com ITUs recorrentes. A adição de 14 novos estudos à revisão mostrou que o suco de cranberry é menos eficaz do que se pensava originalmente. Apesar de alguns estudos menores terem demonstrado um benefício pequeno para mulheres com ITU de repetição, isso não ficou evidente quando os resultados de um grande estudo foram incluídos. De acordo com os achados de três pequenos estudos, produtos de cranberry não foram significativamente melhores do que antibióticos na prevenção de infecções do trato urinário. Devido ao grande número de desistências/exclusão de participantes (atribuído principalmente à falta de aceitação dos produtos de cranberry, principalmente sucos por longos períodos), e as evidências mostrando pouco benefício para a prevenção de ITU, no presente o suco de cranberry não pode ser recomendado para a prevenção de ITU. Outras formas do produto (por exemplo pós) ainda precisam ser analisadas através de métodos laboratoriais consagrados para verificar sua potência e se contêm quantidades suficientes do princípio "ativo", para então serem testadas em futuros estudos clínicos ou recomendadas para uso.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Abstract
  5. Plain language summary

Cranberries para a prevenção de infecções do trato urinário

Cranberries para a prevenção de infecções do trato urinário

Cranberries (geralmente na forma de suco de cranberry) têm sido utilizadas para prevenir infecções do trato urinário (UTIs). As cranberries contém uma substância que pode evitar a aderência de bactérias na parede da bexiga. Isso poderia ajudar a prevenir infecções da bexida e outros tipos de UTIs. Esta revisão identificou 24 estudos (4473 participantes) que compararam produtos de cranberry com um grupo controle ou que recebeu tratamentos alternativos. Foi constatada uma pequena tendência para uma queda nas UTIs em pessoas que consumiam produtos de cranberry quando comparadas com um grupo placebo ou sem tratamento algum, porém essa diferença não foi significante. Muitas pessoas que participaram dos estudos pararam de tomar o suco de cranberry, sugerindo que essa intervenção não seria aceitável. O suco de cranberry não traz benefícios significativos na prevenção de UTIs e seu consumo a longo prazo parece ser pouco aceito. Outros produtos com cranberry (como pastilhas e cápsulas) também foram ineficazes (se bem que tiveram o mesmo efeito do que antibióticos),e possivelmente isso seja devido à falta de poder do 'ingrediente ativo'.

Translation notes

Translated by: Brazilian Cochrane Centre
Translation Sponsored by: None