This is not the most recent version of the article. View current version (17 SEP 2014)

Intervention Review

Acellular vaccines for preventing whooping cough in children

  1. Linjie Zhang1,*,
  2. Sílvio OM Prietsch1,
  3. Inge Axelsson2,3,
  4. Scott A Halperin4

Editorial Group: Cochrane Acute Respiratory Infections Group

Published Online: 14 MAR 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 9 JAN 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001478.pub5


How to Cite

Zhang L, Prietsch SOM, Axelsson I, Halperin SA. Acellular vaccines for preventing whooping cough in children. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 3. Art. No.: CD001478. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001478.pub5.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Federal University of Rio Grande, Faculty of Medicine, Rio Grande, RS, Brazil

  2. 2

    Östersund County Hospital, Östersund, Sweden

  3. 3

    Mid Sweden University, Östersund, Sweden

  4. 4

    Halifax Dalhousie University, IWK Health Centre, Canadian Center for Vaccinology, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada

*Linjie Zhang, Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Rio Grande, Rua Visconde Paranaguá 102, Centro, Rio Grande, RS, 96201-900, Brazil. zhanglinjie63@yahoo.com.br.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 14 MAR 2012

SEARCH

This is not the most recent version of the article. View current version (17 SEP 2014)

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Background

Routine use of whole-cell pertussis (wP) vaccines was suspended in some countries in the 1970s and 1980s because of concerns about adverse effects. Following such action, there was a resurgence of whooping cough. Acellular pertussis (aP) vaccines, containing purified or recombinant Bordetella pertussis (B. pertussis) antigens, were developed in the hope that they would be as effective, but less reactogenic than the whole-cell vaccines.

Objectives

To assess the efficacy and safety of acellular pertussis vaccines in children.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 4) which contains the Cochrane Acute Respiratory Infections Group's Specialised Register, MEDLINE (1950 to December week 4, 2011), EMBASE (1974 to January 2012), Biosis Previews (2009 to January 2012), and CINAHL (2009 to January 2012).

Selection criteria

We selected double-blind randomised efficacy and safety trials of aP vaccines in children up to six years old, with active follow-up of participants and laboratory verification of pertussis cases.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias in the studies. Differences in trial design precluded a meta-analysis of the efficacy data. We pooled the safety data from individual trials using a random-effects meta-analysis model.

Main results

We included six efficacy trials with a total of 46,283 participants and 52 safety trials with a total of 136,541 participants. Most of the safety trials did not report the methods for random sequence generation, allocation concealment and blinding, which made it difficult to assess the risk of bias in the studies. The efficacy of multi-component (≥ three) vaccines varied from 84% to 85% in preventing typical whooping cough (characterised by 21 or more consecutive days of paroxysmal cough with confirmation of B. pertussis infection by culture, appropriate serology or contact with a household member who has culture-confirmed pertussis), and from 71% to 78% in preventing mild pertussis disease (characterised by seven or more consecutive days of cough with confirmation of B. pertussis infection by culture or appropriate serology). In contrast, the efficacy of one- and two-component vaccines varied from 59% to 75% against typical whooping cough and from 13% to 54% against mild pertussis disease. Multi-component acellular vaccines are more effective than low-efficacy whole-cell vaccines, but may be less effective than the highest-efficacy whole-cell vaccines. Most systemic and local adverse events were significantly less common with aP vaccines than with wP vaccines for the primary series as well as for the booster dose.

Authors' conclusions

Multi-component (≥ three) aP vaccines are effective and show less adverse effects than wP vaccines for the primary series as well as for booster doses.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Acellular vaccines for preventing whooping cough in children

Whooping cough (pertussis) can be a serious respiratory infection. Vaccines made from killed whole Bordetella pertussis (B. pertussis) were developed but they could cause severe neurologic disorders such as convulsions, encephalopathy and hypotonic-hyporesponsive episodes, as well as minor adverse events, such as anorexia, drowsiness, fever, irritability and fretfulness, prolonged crying, vomiting, and injection site pain/redness/swelling/induration. This led to a fall in immunisation rates, which resulted in an increase in the incidence of whooping cough. Acellular pertussis (aP) vaccines (containing purified or recombinant B. pertussis antigens) were developed in the hope that they would be as effective but less reactogenic than the whole-cell pertussis (wP) vaccines.

This updated review included six efficacy trials with a total of 46,283 participants and 52 safety trials with a total of 136,541 participants. The efficacy of multi-component (≥ three) acellular vaccines varied from 84% to 85% in preventing typical whooping cough (characterised by 21 or more consecutive days of paroxysmal cough with confirmation of B. pertussis infection by culture, appropriate serology or contact with a household member who has culture-confirmed pertussis) and from 71% to 78% in preventing mild pertussis disease (characterised by seven or more consecutive days of cough with confirmation of B. pertussis infection by culture or appropriate serology). One- and two-component acellular vaccines were less effective. Most systemic and local adverse events were significantly less common with aP than with wP vaccines for the primary series as well as for the booster dose. This review found that multi-component vaccines which contain three or more aP components are effective, with less adverse effects than wP vaccines.

 

Resumen

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Antecedentes

Vacunas acelulares para prevenir la tos ferina en niños

El uso habitual de vacunas antipertussis de células enteras se suspendió en algunos países a fines de la década de los años setenta y principios de la década de los ochenta debido a preocupaciones acerca de los efectos adversos. Hubo un resurgimiento de la tos ferina. Las vacunas antipertussis acelulares (con antígenos purificados o recombinantes de Bordetella pertussis) se desarrollaron con la esperanza de que fueran tan eficaces como las vacunas células enteras, pero con menos reactogenicidad.

Objetivos

Evaluar la eficacia y la seguridad de las vacunas antipertussis acelulares en niños.

Estrategia de búsqueda

Se hicieron búsquedas en el Registro Cochrane de Ensayos Controlados (Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials, CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2009, número 2), que incluye el Registro Especializado del Grupo Cochrane de Infecciones Respiratorias Agudas (Acute Respiratory Infections Group); MEDLINE (1950 hasta abril, semana 2, 2009) y EMBASE (1974 hasta abril 2009).

Criterios de selección

Ensayos aleatorios doble ciego de la eficacia y seguridad de las vacunas antipertussis acelulares en niños de hasta seis años, con seguimiento activo de los participantes y verificación en el laboratorio de los casos de pertussis.

Obtención y análisis de los datos

Dos autores de la revisión realizaron de forma independiente la extracción de los datos y la evaluación de la calidad de los estudios. Las diferencias en el diseño de los ensayos impidieron el agrupamiento de los datos de eficacia. Los datos de seguridad de los ensayos individuales se agruparon mediante el paquete estadístico Cochrane Review Manager 5.

Resultados principales

Se incluyeron seis ensayos de eficacia y 52 ensayos de seguridad. La eficacia de las vacunas multicomponentes (≥ 3) varió del 84% al 85% para prevenir la tos ferina típica, y del 71% al 78% para prevenir la enfermedad pertussis leve. Por el contrario, la eficacia de las vacunas de uno y dos componentes varió del 59% al 75% contra la tos ferina típica, y del 13% al 54% contra la enfermedad pertussis leve. Las vacunas acelulares multicomponentes son más eficaces que las vacunas de células enteras de baja eficacia, pero es posible que no sean tan eficaces como las vacunas de células enteras de más alta eficacia. La mayoría de los eventos adversos sistémicos y locales fueron significativamente menos frecuentes con las vacunas antipertussis acelulares que con las vacunas antipertussis de células enteras para las series primarias, al igual que para la dosis de refuerzo.

Conclusiones de los autores

Las vacunas antipertussis acelulares multicomponentes son eficaces y muestran menos efectos adversos que las vacunas contra pertussis de células enteras para las series primarias, al igual que para la dosis de refuerzo.

Traducción

Traducción realizada por el Centro Cochrane Iberoamericano

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Vaccins acellulaires pour la prévention de la coqueluche chez l'enfant

Contexte

L'utilisation systématique des vaccins anticoquelucheux à germes entiers (wP) a été suspendue dans certains pays au cours des années 70 et 80 en raison d'inquiétudes concernant leurs effets indésirables. Cette suspension a entraîné une résurgence des cas de coqueluche. Les vaccins anticoquelucheux acellulaires (aP), contenant des antigènes Bordetella pertussis (B. pertussis) purifiés ou recombinants, ont été développés dans l'espoir d'être aussi efficaces, mais moins réactogéniques, que les vaccins anticoquelucheux à germes entiers (wP).

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité et la tolérance des vaccins anticoquelucheux acellulaires chez l'enfant.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, numéro 4), qui contient le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les infections respiratoires aiguës, MEDLINE (de 1950 à la semaine 4 de décembre 2011), EMBASE (de 1974 à janvier 2012), Biosis Previews (de 2009 à janvier 2012) et CINAHL (de 2009 à janvier 2012).

Critères de sélection

Nous avons sélectionné des essais d'efficacité et de tolérance randomisés en double aveugle de vaccins aP administrés à des enfants âgés de six ans au maximum, avec un suivi actif et une vérification en laboratoire des cas de coqueluche.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de cette revue ont indépendamment extrait des données et évalué les risques de biais dans les études. Des différences de conception des essais empêchaient la réalisation d'une méta-analyse des données d'efficacité. Nous avons combiné les données de tolérance issues d'essais individuels en utilisant un modèle de méta-analyse à effets aléatoires.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus six essais d'efficacité totalisant 46 283 participants et 52 essais de tolérance totalisant 136 541 participants. La majorité des essais de tolérance n'indiquaient pas les méthodes de génération de séquences aléatoires, d'assignation secrète et de mise en aveugle, ce qui rendait plus difficile l'évaluation des risques de biais dans les études. L'efficacité des vaccins multicomposants (≥ trois) variait de 84 % à 85 % pour la prévention de la coqueluche typique (qui se caractérise par 21 jours consécutifs, ou plus, de toux paroxysmale avec confirmation de l'infection B. pertussis par culture, une sérologie appropriée ou un contact avec un membre de la famille atteint d'une coqueluche confirmée par culture) et de 71 % à 78 % pour la prévention des formes bénignes de la coqueluche (qui se caractérise par sept jours consécutifs, ou plus, de toux avec confirmation de l'infection B. pertussis par culture ou une sérologie appropriée). En revanche, l'efficacité des vaccins à un ou deux composants variait de 59 % à 75 % contre la coqueluche typique et de 13 % à 54 % contre les formes bénignes de la coqueluche. Les vaccins acellulaires multicomposants sont plus efficaces que les vaccins à germes entiers à faible efficacité, mais peuvent être moins efficaces que les vaccins à germes entiers dont l'efficacité est plus élevée. La majorité des événements indésirables systémiques et locaux étaient nettement moins fréquents avec les vaccins aP qu'avec les vaccins wP de la première série, ainsi que la dose de rappel.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les vaccins aP multicomposants (≥ trois) sont efficaces et montrent moins d'effets indésirables que les vaccins wP de la première série, ainsi que les doses de rappel.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Vaccins acellulaires pour la prévention de la coqueluche chez l'enfant

Vaccins acellulaires pour la prévention de la coqueluche chez l'enfant

La coqueluche (pertussis) peut être une infection respiratoire grave. Des vaccins élaborés à partir de la bactérie Bordetella pertussis (B. pertussis) entière tuée ont été développés, mais pouvaient causer des troubles neurologiques graves comme des convulsions, une encéphalopathie et des épisodes hypotoniques-hyporéactifs, ainsi que des événements indésirables mineurs tels que l'anorexie, des somnolences, de la fièvre, de l'irritabilité et de l'anxiété, des pleurs prolongés, des vomissements et des douleurs/rougeurs/gonflements/indurations sur le site de l'injection. Ces différents troubles ont provoqué une chute des taux d'immunisation, ce qui a entraîné une augmentation de l'incidence de la coqueluche. Les vaccins anticoquelucheux acellulaires (aP pour « acellular pertussis ») (contenant des antigènes B. pertussis purifiés ou recombinants) ont été développés dans l'espoir d'être aussi efficaces, mais moins réactogéniques, que les vaccins anticoquelucheux à germes entiers (wP pour « whole-cell pertussis »).

Cette revue mise à jour incluait six essais d'efficacité totalisant 46 283 participants et 52 essais de tolérance totalisant 136 541 participants. L'efficacité des vaccins acellulaires multicomposants (≥ trois) variait de 84 % à 85 % pour la prévention de la coqueluche typique (qui se caractérise par 21 jours consécutifs, ou plus, de toux paroxysmale avec confirmation de l'infection B. pertussis par culture, une sérologie appropriée ou un contact avec un membre de la famille atteint d'une coqueluche confirmée par culture) et de 71 % à 78 % pour la prévention des formes bénignes de la coqueluche (qui se caractérise par sept jours consécutifs, ou plus, de toux avec confirmation de l'infection B. pertussis par culture ou une sérologie appropriée). Les vaccins acellulaires à un ou deux composants étaient moins efficaces. La majorité des événements indésirables systémiques et locaux étaient nettement moins fréquents avec les vaccins aP qu'avec les vaccins wP de la première série, ainsi que la dose de rappel. Cette revue a trouvé que les vaccins multicomposants contenant trois composants aP, ou plus, sont efficaces et présentent moins d'effets indésirables que les vaccins wP.

Notes de traduction

Cette revue a été précédemment retirée de la Cochrane Library dans le numéro 3 de 2006. Des recherches électroniques ont été réalisées en 1998 et l'auteur principal n'a pas pu mettre à jour cette revue. En mai 2008, une nouvelle équipe d'auteurs de revues a repris et mis à jour cette revue.

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 18th May, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français