Intervention Review

Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines for preventing otitis media

  1. Alexandre C Fortanier1,
  2. Roderick P Venekamp2,
  3. Chantal WB Boonacker1,
  4. Eelko Hak3,
  5. Anne GM Schilder4,
  6. Elisabeth AM Sanders5,
  7. Roger AMJ Damoiseaux1,*

Editorial Group: Cochrane Acute Respiratory Infections Group

Published Online: 2 APR 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 3 DEC 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001480.pub4


How to Cite

Fortanier AC, Venekamp RP, Boonacker CWB, Hak E, Schilder AGM, Sanders EAM, Damoiseaux RAMJ. Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines for preventing otitis media. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD001480. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001480.pub4.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University Medical Center Utrecht, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht, Netherlands

  2. 2

    University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Otorhinolaryngology & Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht, Netherlands

  3. 3

    University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Epidemiology, Groningen, Netherlands

  4. 4

    Faculty of Brain Sciences, University College London, evidENT, Ear Institute, London, UK

  5. 5

    Wilhelmina Children's Hospital, University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Pediatric Immunology and Infectious Diseases, Utrecht, Netherlands

*Roger AMJ Damoiseaux, Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, HP: Str. 6.131, PO Box 85500, Utrecht, 3508 GA, Netherlands. R.A.M.J.Damoiseaux@umcutrecht.nl. rdamoiseaux@hotmail.com, R.DAMOISEAUX@tiscali.nl.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (conclusions changed)
  2. Published Online: 2 APR 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Acute otitis media (AOM) is a very common respiratory infection in early infancy and childhood. The marginal benefits of antibiotics for AOM in low-risk populations in general, the increasing problem of bacterial resistance to antibiotics and the huge estimated direct and indirect annual costs associated with otitis media (OM) have prompted a search for effective vaccines to prevent AOM.

Objectives

To assess the effect of pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) in preventing AOM in children up to 12 years of age.

Search methods

We searched CENTRAL (2013, Issue 11), MEDLINE (1995 to November week 3, 2013), EMBASE (1995 to December 2013), CINAHL (2007 to December 2013), LILACS (2007 to December 2013) and Web of Science (2007 to December 2013).

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of PCVs to prevent AOM in children aged 12 years or younger, with a follow-up of at least six months after vaccination.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data.

Main results

We included 11 publications of nine RCTs (n = 48,426 children, range 74 to 37,868 per study) of 7- to 11-valent PCV (with different carrier proteins). Five trials (n = 47,108) included infants, while four trials (n = 1318) included children aged one to seven years that were either healthy (one study, n = 264) or had a previous history of upper respiratory tract infection (URTI), including AOM. We judged the methodological quality of the included studies to be moderate to high. There was considerable clinical diversity between studies in terms of study population, type of conjugate vaccine and outcome measures. We therefore refrained from pooling the results.

In three studies, the 7-valent PCV with CRM197 as carrier protein (CRM197-PCV7) administered during early infancy was associated with a relative risk reduction (RRR) of all-cause AOM ranging from -5% in high-risk children (95% confidence interval (CI) -25% to 12%) to 7% in low-risk children (95% CI 4% to 9%). Another 7-valent PCV with the outer membrane protein complex of Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis) serogroup B as carrier protein, administered in infancy, did not reduce overall AOM episodes, while a precursor 11-valent PCV with Haemophilus influenzae (H. influenzae) protein D as carrier protein was associated with a RRR of all-cause AOM episodes of 34% (95% CI 21% to 44%).

A 9-valent PCV (with CRM197 carrier protein) administered in healthy toddlers was associated with a RRR of (parent-reported) OM episodes of 17% (95% CI -2% to 33%). CRM197-PCV7 followed by 23-valent pneumococcal polysaccharide vaccination administered after infancy in older children with a history of AOM showed no beneficial effect on first occurrence and later AOM episodes. In a study in older children with a previously diagnosed respiratory tract infection, performed during the influenza season, a trivalent influenza vaccine combined with placebo (TIV/placebo) led to fewer all-cause AOM episodes than vaccination with TIV and PCV7 (TIV/PCV7) when compared to hepatitis B vaccination and placebo (HBV/placebo) (RRR 71%, 95% CI 30% to 88% versus RRR 57%, 95% CI 6% to 80%, respectively) indicating that CRM197-PCV7 after infancy may even have negative effects on AOM.

Authors' conclusions

Based on current evidence of the effects of PCVs for preventing AOM, the licensed 7-valent CRM197-PCV7 has modest beneficial effects in healthy infants with a low baseline risk of AOM. Administering PCV7 in high-risk infants, after early infancy and in older children with a history of AOM, appears to have no benefit in preventing further episodes. Currently, several RCTs with different (newly licensed, multivalent) PCVs administered during early infancy are ongoing to establish their effects on AOM. Results of these studies may provide a better understanding of the role of the newly licensed, multivalent PCVs in preventing AOM. Also the impact on AOM of the carrier protein D, as used in certain pneumococcal vaccines, needs to be further established.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Vaccination against a bacterium called pneumococcus for preventing middle ear infection

Review question
We reviewed the evidence about the effect of vaccination against pneumococcus (a type of bacterium) on preventing middle ear infections in children.

Background
Middle ear infection, or otitis media, is one of the most common respiratory infections in childhood. Infection with Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus) is a frequent cause of middle ear infection. Vaccination against pneumococcus with pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) is primarily introduced to protect young children against severe pneumococcal infections, such as meningitis and pneumonia. We wanted to discover whether vaccination with PCV also leads to fewer middle ear infections in children.

Study characteristics
This review included evidence up to 3 December 2013. Nine trials with a total of 48,426 children were included; five trials included 47,108 infants, while four trials included 1318 children at a later age, i.e. aged one to seven years, who were either healthy (one trial, 264 children) or had previous upper respiratory tract infections, including middle ear infections. All trials had a long follow-up, varying from 6 to 40 months.

Key outcomes
When vaccinating against seven different serotypes of pneumococcus (7-valent PCV) during early infancy, the occurrence of middle ear infections either increased by 5% or decreased by 6% to 7%. One study in infants used 11 serotypes of pneumococcus together with a carrier protein from another bacterium (Haemophilus influenzae); this decreased the occurrence of middle ear infections by 34%.

Children with a history of middle ear infections do not seem to benefit from 7-valent PCV when immunised at an older age (after infancy).

Quality of the evidence
We judged the quality of the evidence for 7-valent PCV in early infancy to be high (further research is very unlikely to change our confidence in the estimate of effect), while we judged the quality of the evidence for multivalent (more than seven different serotypes) PCV to be moderate (further research is likely to have an important impact on our confidence in the estimate of effect and may change the estimate), as this evidence is derived from only one trial. We judged the quality of the evidence for 7-valent PCV in older children with a history of middle ear infections to be high.

Future studies on the effects of PCV in infants, with broader serotype coverage (more than seven different serotypes), are likely to provide more understanding of the role of PCV in preventing middle ear infections.

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Vaccins antipneumococciques conjugués pour prévenir l'otite moyenne

Contexte

L'otite moyenne aiguë (OMA) est une infection très fréquente des voies aériennes de la petite enfance et de l'enfance. Les bénéfices marginaux des antibiotiques pour l'OMA dans les populations globalement à faible risque, le problème croissant de l'antibiorésistance et les énormes coûts annuels estimatifs directs et indirects associés à l'otite moyenne (OM) ont suscité la recherche de vaccins efficaces pour prévenir l'OMA.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'effet des vaccins antipneumococciques conjugués (VAC) dans la prévention de l'OMA chez les enfants jusqu'à 12 ans.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans CENTRAL (2013, numéro 11), MEDLINE (de 1995 à la 3ème semaine de novembre 2013), EMBASE (de 1995 à décembre 2013), CINAHL (de 2007 à décembre 2013), LILACS (de 2007 à décembre 2013) et Web of Science (de 2007 à décembre 2013).

Critères de sélection

Les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) de VAC pour prévenir l'OMA chez les enfants de 12 ans ou moins, avec un suivi d'au moins six mois après la vaccination.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment évalué la qualité des essais et extrait les données.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus 11 publications de neuf ECR (n = 48 426 enfants, allant de 74 à 37 868 par étude) de VAC 7 à 11-valent (avec différentes protéines de transport). Cinq essais (n = 47 108) ont inclus des nourrissons, tandis que quatre essais (n = 1318) incluaient des enfants âgés de un à sept ans qui étaient soit en bonne santé (une étude, n = 264) ou ayant des antécédents d'infection des voies aériennes supérieures (IVAS) notamment des OMA. Nous avons estimé que la qualité méthodologique des études incluses était modérée à élevée. Il y avait une importante diversité clinique entre les études en termes de population d'étude, de type de vaccin conjugué et des mesures de résultat. Nous nous sommes donc abstenus de combiner les résultats.

Dans trois études, le VAC 7-valent avec CRM197 comme protéine de transport (CRM197-PCV7) administré pendant la petite enfance était associé à une réduction du risque relatif (RRR) de l'OMA toutes causes, allant de 5 % chez les enfants à haut risque (intervalle de confiance à 95 % (IC) à -25 % à 12 %) à 7 % chez les enfants à faible risque (IC à 95 % de 4 % à 9 %). Un autre VAC 7-valent ayant le complexe protéinique de la membrane externe de Neisseria meningitidis (N. meningitidis) sérogroupe B comme protéine de transport, administré durant la petite enfance, ne réduisait globalement pas les épisodes d’OMA, alors qu’un VAC 11-valent précurseur avec la protéine D de Haemophilus influenzae (H. influenzae) comme protéine de transport était associé à une réduction relative du risque d’épisodes toutes causes d’OMA de 34 % (IC à 95 % entre 21 % et 44 %).

Un VAC 9-valent (avec la protéine vectrice CRM197) administré chez des tout-petits en bonne santé, était associé à une RRR de 17 % des épisodes d'OM (signalés par les parents) (IC à 95 % de -2 % à 33 %). Un VAC 7-valent CRM197 suivi d'un vaccin antipneumococcique polysaccharidique 23-valent administré après la petite enfance chez des enfants ayant des antécédents d'OMA ne révélait aucun effet bénéfique sur la première survenue et les épisodes ultérieurs d'OMA. Dans une étude chez des enfants plus âgés ayant eu précédemment un diagnostic d'infection des voies respiratoires, un vaccin antigrippal trivalent combiné à un placebo (VAT/placebo) administré pendant la saison grippale, entraînait moins d'épisodes d'OMA, toutes causes confondues, que la vaccination avec la combinaison VAT et VAC 7-valent (VAT/VAC7) par rapport à une vaccination contre l'hépatite B associée à un placebo (VHB/placebo) (RRR de 71%, IC à 95 % de 30 % à 88 % versus une RRR de 57%, IC à 95 % 6 % à 80%, respectivement), ce qui indique que le VAC 7-valent CRM197 après la petite enfance pourrait même avoir des effets négatifs sur l'OMA.

Conclusions des auteurs

Sur la base des preuves actuelles sur les effets des VAC pour prévenir l'OMA, le VAC 7-valent CRM197 a de modestes effets bénéfiques chez les nourrissons sains avec un faible risque de base d'OMA. L'administration du VAC7 chez des nourrissons à haut risque, après la petite enfance et chez les enfants plus âgés ayant des antécédents d'OMA, semble n'apporter aucun bénéfice pour la prévention de nouveaux épisodes. Actuellement, plusieurs ECR avec différents VAC (récemment autorisés, multivalents) administrés pendant la petite enfance sont en cours pour établir leurs effets sur l'OMA. Les résultats de ces études pourraient conférer une meilleure compréhension du rôle des nouveaux VAC multivalents, récemment autorisés, dans la prévention de l'OMA. De même, l'impact sur l'OMA de la protéine de transport D, utilisée dans certains vaccins antipneumococciques, doit être encore établi.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Vaccins antipneumococciques conjugués pour prévenir l'otite moyenne

La vaccination contre une bactérie connue sous le nom de pneumocoque pour prévenir l'otite moyenne aiguë

Question de la revue
Nous avons examiné les preuves concernant l'effet de la vaccination contre le pneumocoque (un type de bactérie) sur la prévention des infections de l'oreille moyenne chez les enfants.

Contexte
L'infection de l'oreille moyenne, ou otite moyenne, est l'une des plus fréquentes infections des voies aériennes de l'enfance. L'infection par Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumocoque) est une cause fréquente d'infection de l'oreille moyenne. La vaccination contre le pneumocoque avec des vaccins antipneumococciques conjugués (VAC) est principalement pratiquée pour protéger les jeunes enfants contre de graves infections pneumococciques, telles que la méningite et la pneumonie. Nous avons voulu déterminer si la vaccination par un VAC conduit également à moins d'infections de l'oreille moyenne chez les enfants.

Les caractéristiques de l'étude
Cette revue a inclus des données jusqu'au 3 décembre 2013. Neuf essais portant sur un total de 48 426 enfants ont été inclus; cinq essais incluaient 47 108 nourrissons, tandis que quatre essais incluaient 1318 enfants, à un âge plus tardif c'est à dire âgés de un à sept ans, qui étaient soit en bonne santé (un essai, 264 enfants) soit ayant eu des infections des voies aériennes supérieures, notamment des infections de l'oreille moyenne. Tous les essais présentaient un suivi à long terme, variant de 6 à 40 mois.

Les critères de jugement principaux
Lorsque l'on vaccine contre sept différents sérotypes de pneumocoques (VAC 7-valent) pendant la petite enfance, l'incidence des infections de l'oreille moyenne soit augmente de 5 % soit diminue de 6 % à 7 %. Une étude chez des nourrissons a utilisé 11 sérotypes de pneumocoques associés à une protéine de transport issue d'une autre bactérie (Haemophilus influenzae); cela a diminué la survenue des infections de l'oreille moyenne de 34 %.

Il semble que le VAC 7-valent n'apporte pas de bénéfice aux enfants ayant des antécédents d'infections de l'oreille moyenne lorsqu'ils sont vaccinés à un âge avancé (après la petite enfance).

Qualité des preuves
Nous avons estimé que la qualité des preuves pour le VAC 7-valent administré dans la petite enfance était élevée (d'autres recherches ont très peu de chances de modifier notre confiance dans l'estimation de l'effet), tandis que nous avons estimé que la qualité des preuves pour le VAC multivalent (plus de sept différents sérotypes) était modérée (des recherches supplémentaires sont susceptibles d'avoir un impact important sur notre confiance dans l'estimation de l'effet et pourraient modifier l'estimation), car les données probantes sont issues d'un seul essai. Nous avons estimé que la qualité des preuves pour le VAC 7-valent chez des enfants plus âgés ayant des antécédents d'infections de l'oreille moyenne est élevée.

De futures études, chez les nourrissons, sur les effets des VAC à plus large couverture sérotypique (plus de sept différents sérotypes), sont susceptibles de fournir davantage de compréhension du rôle des VAC dans la prévention d'infections de l'oreille moyenne.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 31st July, 2014
Traduction financée par: Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux