Intervention Review

Interventions for improving mobility after hip fracture surgery in adults

  1. Helen HG Handoll2,
  2. Catherine Sherrington1,*,
  3. Jenson CS Mak3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group

Published Online: 16 MAR 2011

Assessed as up-to-date: 30 JUN 2010

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001704.pub4


How to Cite

Handoll HHG, Sherrington C, Mak JCS. Interventions for improving mobility after hip fracture surgery in adults. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 3. Art. No.: CD001704. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001704.pub4.

Author Information

  1. 1

    The George Institute for Global Health, Musculoskeletal Division, Sydney, NSW, Australia

  2. 2

    Teesside University, Health and Social Care Institute, Middlesborough, Tees Valley, UK

  3. 3

    St Vincent's Hospital, Sacred Heart Rehabilitation Service, Sydney, Australia

*Catherine Sherrington, Musculoskeletal Division, The George Institute for Global Health, PO Box M201, Missenden Road, Sydney, NSW, 2050, Australia. csherrington@georgeinstitute.org.au.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (conclusions changed)
  2. Published Online: 16 MAR 2011

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Background

Hip fracture mainly occurs in older people. Strategies to improve mobility include gait retraining, various forms of exercise and muscle stimulation.

Objectives

To evaluate the effects of different interventions for improving mobility after hip fracture surgery in adults.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, MEDLINE and other databases, and reference lists of articles, up to April 2010.

Selection criteria

All randomised or quasi-randomised trials comparing different mobilisation strategies after hip fracture surgery.

Data collection and analysis

The authors independently selected trials, assessed risk of bias and extracted data. There was no data pooling.

Main results

The 19 included trials (involving 1589 older adults) were small, often with methodological flaws. Just two pairs of trials tested similar interventions.

Twelve trials evaluated mobilisation strategies started soon after hip fracture surgery. Single trials found improved mobility from, respectively, a two-week weight-bearing programme, a quadriceps muscle strengthening exercise programme and electrical stimulation aimed at alleviating pain. Single trials found no significant improvement in mobility from, respectively, a treadmill gait retraining programme, 12 weeks of resistance training, and 16 weeks of weight-bearing exercise. One trial testing ambulation started within 48 hours of surgery found contradictory results. One historic trial found no significant difference in unfavourable outcomes for weight bearing started at two versus 12 weeks. Of two trials evaluating more intensive physiotherapy regimens, one found no difference in recovery, the other reported a higher level of drop-out in the more intensive group. Two trials tested electrical stimulation of the quadriceps: one found no benefit and poor tolerance of the intervention; the other found improved mobility and good tolerance.

Seven trials evaluated strategies started after hospital discharge. Started soon after discharge, two trials found improved outcome after 12 weeks of intensive physical training and a home-based physical therapy programme respectively. Begun after completion of standard physical therapy, one trial found improved outcome after six months of intensive physical training, one trial found increased activity levels from a one year exercise programme, and one trial found no significant effects of home-based resistance or aerobic training. One trial found improved outcome after home-based exercises started around 22 weeks from injury. One trial found home-based weight-bearing exercises starting at seven months produced no significant improvement in mobility.

Authors' conclusions

There is insufficient evidence from randomised trials to establish the best strategies for enhancing mobility after hip fracture surgery.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Interventions aimed at improving and restoring mobility after hip fracture surgery in adults

The aim of care after surgery for hip fracture is to get people safely back on their feet and walking again. Initially, people may be asked to rest in bed and restrict weight bearing. Then various strategies to improve mobility, including gait retraining and exercise programmes, are used during hospital stay and often after discharge from hospital.

This review includes evidence from 19 trials involving 1589 participants, generally aged over 65 years. Many of the trials had weak methods, including inadequate follow-up. There was no pooling of data because no two trials were sufficiently alike.

Twelve trials evaluated interventions started soon after hip fracture surgery. Single trials found improved mobility from, respectively, a two-week weight-bearing programme, a quadriceps muscle strengthening exercise programme and electrical stimulation aimed at alleviating pain. Single trials found no significant improvement in mobility from, respectively, a treadmill gait retraining programme, 12 weeks of resistance training, and 16 weeks of weight-bearing exercise. One trial testing ambulation started within 48 hours of surgery found contradictory results. One historic trial found no significant difference in unfavourable outcomes for weight bearing started at two versus 12 weeks. Of two trials evaluating more intensive physiotherapy regimens, one found no difference in recovery, the other reported a higher level of drop-out in the more intensive group. Two trials tested electrical stimulation of the quadriceps: one found no benefit and poor tolerance of the intervention; the other found improved mobility and good tolerance.

Seven trials evaluated interventions started after hospital discharge. Started soon after discharge, two trials found improved outcome after 12 weeks of intensive physical training and a home-based physical therapy programme respectively. Begun after completion of standard physical therapy, one trial found improved outcome after six months of intensive physical training, one trial found increased activity levels from a one year exercise programme, and one trial found no significant effects of home-based resistance or aerobic training. One trial found improved outcome after home-based exercises started around 22 weeks from injury. One trial found home-based weight-bearing exercises starting at seven months produced no significant improvement in mobility.

In summary, the review found there was not enough evidence to determine which are the best strategies, started in hospital or after discharge from hospital, for helping people walk and continue walking after hip fracture surgery.

 

Resumen

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Antecedentes

Intervenciones para mejorar la movilidad después de la cirugía por fractura de cadera en adultos

La fractura de cadera ocurre principalmente en personas de edad avanzada. Las estrategias para mejorar la movilidad incluyen el readiestramiento de la marcha, diversas formas de ejercicio y estimulación muscular.

Objetivos

Evaluar los efectos de diferentes intervenciones para mejorar la movilización después de la cirugía por fractura de cadera en adultos.

Estrategia de búsqueda

Se realizaron búsquedas en el Registro Especializado de Ensayos Controlados del Grupo Cochrane de Lesiones Óseas, Articulares y Musculares (Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group), en el Registro Cochrane Central de Ensayos Controlados (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials), MEDLINE y en otras bases de datos, y en listas de referencias de artículos hasta abril 2010.

Criterios de selección

Todos los ensayos aleatorios o cuasialeatorios que compararon diferentes estrategias de movilización después de la cirugía por fractura de cadera.

Obtención y análisis de los datos

Los autores seleccionaron de forma independiente los ensayos, evaluaron el riesgo de sesgo y extrajeron los datos. Los datos no se agruparon.

Resultados principales

Los 19 ensayos incluidos (que seleccionaron a 1589 adultos de edad avanzada) fueron pequeños, a menudo con fallas metodológicas. Sólo dos pares de ensayos probaron intervenciones similares.

Doce ensayos evaluaron las estrategias de movilización iniciadas poco después de la cirugía por fractura de cadera. En los ensayos individuales, se halló una mejor movilidad de un programa de dos semanas de levantamiento de peso, un programa de ejercicios de fortalecimiento muscular del cuádriceps y estimulación eléctrica para aliviar el dolor, respectivamente. Los ensayos individuales no encontraron ninguna mejoría significativa en la movilidad de un programa de readiestramiento en cinta rodante, 12 semanas de entrenamiento de resistencia y 16 semanas de ejercicios con levantamiento de peso, respectivamente. En un ensayo que evaluó la deambulación iniciada dentro de las 48 horas después de la cirugía, se obtuvieron resultados contradictorios. Un ensayo histórico no encontró ninguna diferencia significativa en los resultados desfavorables para la carga de peso comenzada a las dos versus 12 semanas. De dos ensayos que evaluaron regímenes de fisioterapia más intensiva, uno no encontró ninguna diferencia en la recuperación, el otro informó un mayor nivel de abandono en el grupo de mayor intensidad. Dos ensayos evaluaron la estimulación eléctrica del cuádriceps: uno no encontró beneficios y observó una tolerancia deficiente de la intervención; el otro encontró una mejor movilidad y buena tolerancia.

Siete ensayos evaluaron estrategias que comenzaron después del alta hospitalaria. Dos ensayos que comenzaron poco después del alta hospitalaria encontraron mejorías en el resultado después de 12 semanas de entrenamiento físico intensivo y de un programa de fisioterapia domiciliario, respectivamente. Un ensayo, que comenzó después de finalizar la fisioterapia estándar, encontró mejorías en el resultado después de seis meses de entrenamiento físico intensivo; otro halló un mayor nivel de actividad a partir de un programa de ejercicios de un año de duración; y otro no encontró efectos significativos del entrenamiento de resistencia o aeróbico domiciliario. Un ensayo encontró mejorías en el resultado después de los ejercicios domiciliarios que comenzaron alrededor de las 22 semanas posteriores a la lesión. Un ensayo encontró que los ejercicios domiciliarios con levantamiento de peso que comenzaron a los siete meses no resultaron en una mejoría significativa de la movilidad.

Conclusiones de los autores

Los ensayos aleatorios no aportan pruebas suficientes para determinar las mejores estrategias para mejorar la movilidad después de la cirugía por fractura de cadera.

Traducción

Traducción realizada por el Centro Cochrane Iberoamericano

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Interventions visant à améliorer la mobilité après le traitement chirurgical d'une fracture de la hanche chez l'adulte

Contexte

Les fractures de la hanche affectent principalement les personnes âgées. Les stratégies visant à améliorer la mobilité incluent une rééducation à la marche, différentes formes d'exercices et une stimulation musculaire.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets des différentes interventions visant à améliorer la mobilité après le traitement chirurgical d'une fracture de la hanche chez l'adulte.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons consulté le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les traumatismes ostéo-articulaires et musculaires, le registre Cochrane central des essais contrôlés, MEDLINE, d'autres bases de données et les références bibliographiques des articles jusqu'en avril 2010.

Critères de sélection

Tous les essais randomisés ou quasi-randomisés comparant différentes stratégies de mobilisation après le traitement chirurgical d'une fracture de la hanche.

Recueil et analyse des données

Les auteurs ont sélectionné les essais, évalué le risque de biais et extrait les données de manière indépendante. Les données n'ont pas pu être combinées.

Résultats Principaux

Les 19 essais inclus (portant sur 1 589 personnes âgées) étaient de petite taille et présentaient souvent des défauts méthodologiques. Deux paires d'essais seulement évaluaient des interventions similaires.

Douze essais évaluaient des stratégies de mobilisation commencées peu de temps après le traitement chirurgical d'une fracture de la hanche. Les essais individuels rapportaient respectivement une amélioration de la mobilité associée à un programme de mise en charge de deux semaines, un programme d'exercices de renforcement musculaire du quadriceps et une stimulation électrique visant à soulager la douleur. Les essais individuels ne rapportaient respectivement aucune amélioration significative de la mobilité associée à un programme de rééducation à la marche sur tapis roulant, un entraînement musculaire de 12 semaines et des exercices de mise en charge pendant 16 semaines. Un essai évaluant l'ambulation commencée dans les 48 heures suivant la chirurgie rapportait des résultats contradictoires. Un essai ancien ne rapportait aucune différence significative en termes de résultats défavorables associés à une mise en charge commencée à deux semaines plutôt qu'à 12. Sur les deux essais évaluant des régimes de physiothérapie plus intensifs, l'un ne rapportait aucune différence en termes de rétablissement et l'autre rapportait une augmentation du nombre de sorties d'étude dans le groupe de l'intervention plus intensive. Deux essais évaluaient la stimulation électrique du quadriceps : l'un ne rapportait aucun bénéfice et une faible tolérance associée à l'intervention ; l'autre rapportait une amélioration de la mobilité et une bonne tolérance.

Sept essais évaluaient des stratégies commencées après la sortie d'hôpital. Lorsque les interventions étaient commencées peu de temps après la sortie, deux essais rapportaient une amélioration des résultats après 12 semaines d'entraînement physique intensif et un programme de physiothérapie à domicile, respectivement. Lorsque les interventions étaient commencées au terme de la physiothérapie standard, un essai rapportait une amélioration des résultats au bout de six mois d'entraînement physique intensif, un essai rapportait une augmentation des niveaux d'activité associée à un programme d'exercices d'une durée d'un an, et un essai ne rapportait aucun effet significatif associé à un entraînement musculaire ou aérobique à domicile. Un essai rapportait une amélioration des résultats après des exercices à domicile commencés 22 semaines environ après la blessure. Un essai indiquait que des exercices de mise en charge à domicile commencés sept mois après la blessure ne produisaient aucune amélioration significative de la mobilité.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les preuves issues d'essais randomisés sont insuffisantes pour identifier les stratégies les plus efficaces pour améliorer la mobilité après le traitement chirurgical d'une fracture de la hanche.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Interventions visant à améliorer la mobilité après le traitement chirurgical d'une fracture de la hanche chez l'adulte

Interventions visant à améliorer et à rétablir la mobilité après le traitement chirurgical d'une fracture de la hanche chez l'adulte

Les soins dispensés après le traitement chirurgical d'une fracture de la hanche ont pour but de permettre aux patients de se lever et de recommencer à marcher en toute sécurité. Initialement, les patients doivent parfois garder le lit et éviter de mobiliser les articulations portantes. Ensuite, différentes stratégies sont mises en œuvre pendant le séjour à l'hôpital et/ou après la sortie du patient afin d'améliorer sa mobilité, notamment une rééducation à la marche et des programmes d'exercices.

Cette revue examine les preuves issues de 19 essais portant sur 1 589 participants généralement âgés de plus de 65 ans. Beaucoup de ces essais présentaient des faiblesses méthodologiques, notamment un suivi inadéquat. Les données n'ont pas été combinées car les essais n'étaient pas suffisamment comparables.

Douze essais évaluaient des interventions commencées peu de temps après le traitement chirurgical d'une fracture de la hanche. Les essais individuels rapportaient respectivement une amélioration de la mobilité associée à un programme de mise en charge de deux semaines, un programme d'exercices de renforcement musculaire du quadriceps et une stimulation électrique visant à soulager la douleur. Les essais individuels ne rapportaient respectivement aucune amélioration significative de la mobilité associée à un programme de rééducation à la marche sur tapis roulant, un entraînement musculaire de 12 semaines et des exercices de mise en charge pendant 16 semaines. Un essai évaluant l'ambulation commencée dans les 48 heures suivant la chirurgie rapportait des résultats contradictoires. Un essai ancien ne rapportait aucune différence significative en termes de résultats défavorables associés à une mise en charge commencée à deux semaines plutôt qu'à 12. Sur les deux essais évaluant des régimes de physiothérapie plus intensifs, l'un ne rapportait aucune différence en termes de rétablissement et l'autre rapportait une augmentation du nombre de sorties d'étude dans le groupe de l'intervention plus intensive. Deux essais évaluaient la stimulation électrique du quadriceps : l'un ne rapportait aucun bénéfice et une faible tolérance associée à l'intervention ; l'autre rapportait une amélioration de la mobilité et une bonne tolérance.

Sept essais évaluaient des interventions commencées après la sortie d'hôpital. Lorsque les interventions étaient commencées peu de temps après la sortie, deux essais rapportaient une amélioration des résultats après 12 semaines d'entraînement physique intensif et un programme de physiothérapie à domicile, respectivement. Lorsque les interventions étaient commencées au terme de la physiothérapie standard, un essai rapportait une amélioration des résultats au bout de six mois d'entraînement physique intensif, un essai rapportait une augmentation des niveaux d'activité associée à un programme d'exercices d'une durée d'un an, et un essai ne rapportait aucun effet significatif associé à un entraînement musculaire ou aérobique à domicile. Un essai rapportait une amélioration des résultats après des exercices à domicile commencés 22 semaines environ après la blessure. Un essai indiquait que des exercices de mise en charge à domicile commencés sept mois après la blessure ne produisaient aucune amélioration significative de la mobilité.

En résumé, cette revue a observé que les preuves étaient insuffisantes pour identifier les stratégies les plus efficaces (commencées à l'hôpital ou après la sortie d'hôpital) pour aider les patients à se remettre sur pied et à marcher après le traitement chirurgical d'une fracture de la hanche.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st July, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.