Intervention Review

Grommets (ventilation tubes) for hearing loss associated with otitis media with effusion in children

  1. George G Browning1,*,
  2. Maroeska M Rovers2,
  3. Ian Williamson3,
  4. Jørgen Lous4,
  5. Martin J Burton5

Editorial Group: Cochrane Ear, Nose and Throat Disorders Group

Published Online: 6 OCT 2010

Assessed as up-to-date: 21 MAR 2010

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001801.pub3

How to Cite

Browning GG, Rovers MM, Williamson I, Lous J, Burton MJ. Grommets (ventilation tubes) for hearing loss associated with otitis media with effusion in children. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2010, Issue 10. Art. No.: CD001801. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001801.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Glasgow Royal Infirmary, MRC Institute of Hearing Research (Scottish Section), Glasgow, UK

  2. 2

    University Medical Center Utrecht, Department of Otorhinolaryngology & Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, Utrecht, Netherlands

  3. 3

    University of Southampton School of Medicine, Department of Community Clinical Sciences, Southampton, UK

  4. 4

    Syddansk Universitetscenter, Institut for Sundhedstjenesteforskning, Odense M, Denmark

  5. 5

    Oxford Radcliffe Hospitals NHS Trust, Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, Oxford, UK

*George G Browning, MRC Institute of Hearing Research (Scottish Section), Glasgow Royal Infirmary, Queen Elizabeth Building, 16 Alexandra Parade, Glasgow, G31 2ER, UK. ggb@ihr.gla.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (conclusions changed)
  2. Published Online: 6 OCT 2010

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Background

Otitis media with effusion (OME; 'glue ear') is common in childhood and surgical treatment with grommets (ventilation tubes) is widespread but controversial.

Objectives

To assess the effectiveness of grommet insertion compared with myringotomy or non-surgical treatment in children with OME.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane ENT Disorders Group Trials Register, other electronic databases and additional sources for published and unpublished trials (most recent search: 22 March 2010).

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials evaluating the effect of grommets. Outcomes studied included hearing level, duration of middle ear effusion, language and speech development, cognitive development, behaviour and adverse effects.

Data collection and analysis

Data from studies were extracted by two authors and checked by the other authors.

Main results

We included 10 trials (1728 participants). Some trials randomised children (grommets versus no grommets), others ears (grommet one ear only). The severity of OME in children varied between trials. Only one 'by child' study (MRC: TARGET) had particularly stringent audiometric entry criteria. No trial was identified that used long-term grommets.

Grommets were mainly beneficial in the first six months by which time natural resolution lead to improved hearing in the non-surgically treated children also. Only one high quality trial that randomised children (N = 211) reported results at three months; the mean hearing level was 12 dB better (95% CI 10 to 14 dB) in those treated with grommets as compared to the controls. Meta-analyses of three high quality trials (N = 523) showed a benefit of 4 dB (95% CI 2 to 6 dB) at six to nine months. At 12 and 18 months follow up no differences in mean hearing levels were found.

Data from three trials that randomised ears (N = 230 ears) showed similar effects to the trials that randomised children. At four to six months mean hearing level was 10 dB better in the grommet ear (95% CI 5 to 16 dB), and at 7 to 12 months and 18 to 24 months was 6 dB (95% CI 2 to 10 dB) and 5 dB (95% CI 3 to 8 dB) dB better.

No effect was found on language or speech development or for behaviour, cognitive or quality of life outcomes.

Tympanosclerosis was seen in about a third of ears that received grommets. Otorrhoea was common in infants, but in older children (three to seven years) occurred in < 2% of grommet ears over two years of follow up.

Authors' conclusions

In children with OME the effect of grommets on hearing, as measured by standard tests, appears small and diminishes after six to nine months by which time natural resolution also leads to improved hearing in the non-surgically treated children. No effect was found on other child outcomes but data on these were sparse. No study has been performed in children with established speech, language, learning or developmental problems so no conclusions can be made regarding treatment of such children.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Grommets (ventilation tubes) for hearing loss associated with otitis media with effusion in children

Evidence suggests that grommets only offer a short-term hearing improvement in children with simple glue ear (otitis media with effusion or OME) who have no other serious medical problems or disabilities. No effect on speech and language development has been shown.

Glue ear is the build up of thick fluid behind the ear drum. It is a common childhood disorder, affecting one or both ears, and is the major cause of transient hearing problems in children. The insertion of grommets (ventilation or tympanostomy tubes) into the ear drum is a surgical treatment option commonly used to improve hearing in children with bilateral glue ear as unilateral glue ear results in minimal, if any, hearing disability. This review found that in children with bilateral glue ear that had not resolved after a period of 12 weeks and was associated with a documented hearing loss, the beneficial effect of grommets on hearing was present at six months but diminished thereafter. Most grommets come out over this time and by then the condition will have resolved in most children. The review did not find any evidence that grommets help speech and language development but no study has been performed in children with established speech, language, learning or developmental problems. Active observation would appear to be an appropriate management strategy for the majority of children with bilateral glue ear as middle ear fluid will resolve spontaneously in most children.

 

Resumen

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Antecedentes

Drenajes timpánicos (tubos de ventilación) para la pérdida de la audición asociada a la otitis media con derrame en niños

La otitis media con derrame (OMD; “otitis adhesiva”) es frecuente en la niñez y su tratamiento quirúrgico con drenajes timpánicos (tubos de ventilación) se ha generalizado, pero es polémico.

Objetivos

Evaluar la efectividad de la inserción de un drenaje timpánico en comparación con la miringotomía o el tratamiento no quirúrgico en los niños con OMD.

Estrategia de búsqueda

Se realizaron búsquedas en el registro de ensayos del Grupo Cochrane de Enfermedades de Oído, Nariz y Garganta (Cochrane ENT Disorders Group Trials Register), en otras bases de datos electrónicas y en fuentes adicionales de ensayos publicados y no publicados (búsqueda más reciente: 22 marzo 2010).

Criterios de selección

Ensayos controlados aleatorios que evaluaron el efecto de los drenajes timpánicos.Los resultados estudiados incluyeron el nivel de audición, la duración del derrame del oído medio, el desarrollo del lenguaje y el habla, el desarrollo cognitivo, la conducta y los efectos adversos.

Obtención y análisis de los datos

Los datos de los estudios fueron obtenidos por dos autores y verificados por los otros dos autores.

Resultados principales

Se incluyeron 10 ensayos (1728 participantes). Algunos ensayos asignaron al azar los niños (drenajes timpánicos versus ningún drenaje timpánico), otros asignaron los oídos (drenaje timpánico en un solo oído).La gravedad de la OMD en los niños varió entre los ensayos.Sólo un estudio “por niño” (MRC: TARGET) tuvo criterios audiométricos de ingreso particularmente estrictos.No se identificaron ensayos que utilizaran drenajes timpánicos a largo plazo.

Los drenajes timpánicos fueron principalmente beneficiosos en los seis primeros meses, que es el tiempo de resolución natural en el que también mejora la audición en los niños no tratados quirúrgicamente. Sólo un ensayo de alta calidad que asignó al azar a los niños (n = 211) presentó resultados a los tres meses; la media del nivel de audición fue 12 dB mejor (IC del 95%: 10 a 14 dB) en los tratados con drenajes timpánicos comparado con los controles. Los metanálisis de tres ensayos de alta calidad (n = 523) mostraron un beneficio de 4 dB (IC del 95%: 2 a 6 dB) a los seis a nueve meses. A los 12 y 18 meses de seguimiento no se encontraron diferencias en la media de los niveles de audición.

Los datos de tres ensayos que asignaron al azar los oídos (n = 230 oídos) mostraron efectos similares a los ensayos que asignaron al azar a los niños.A los cuatro a seis meses la media del nivel de audición fue 10 dB mejor en el oído con drenaje timpánico (IC del 95%: 5 a 16 dB), y a los siete a 12 meses y 18 a 24 meses fue 6 dB (IC del 95%: 2 a 10 dB) y 5 dB (IC del 95%: 3 a 8 dB) mejor.

No se encontraron efectos sobre el desarrollo del lenguaje ni del habla, ni para los resultados conductuales, cognitivos o de calidad de vida.

Se observó timpanoesclerosis en cerca de un tercio de los oídos que recibieron drenajes timpánicos.La otorrea fue frecuente en los neonatos, pero en los niños mayores (tres a siete años) ocurrió en < 2% de los oídos con drenaje timpánico a los dos años de seguimiento.

Conclusiones de los autores

En los niños con OMD el efecto de los drenajes timpánicos sobre la audición, medida con pruebas estándar, parece pequeño y disminuye después de seis a nueve meses que es el período de resolución natural, por lo que también mejora la audición en los niños no tratados quirúrgicamente.No se encontraron efectos sobre otros resultados de los niños, pero los datos fueron escasos. No se han realizado estudios en niños con trastornos confirmados del habla, el lenguaje, el aprendizaje o el desarrollo, por lo que no se pueden establecer conclusiones sobre el tratamiento de esos niños.

Traducción

Traducción realizada por el Centro Cochrane Iberoamericano

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Drains transtympaniques (tubes de ventilation) pour la perte auditive associée à l'otite moyenne avec effusion chez l'enfant

Contexte

L'otite moyenne avec effusion (OME, ou otite séreuse) est une inflammation fréquente chez l'enfant. Le traitement chirurgical à l'aide de drains transtympaniques (tubes de ventilation) est très répandu, mais controversé.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité de l'insertion de drains transtympaniques par rapport à une myringotomie ou à un traitement non chirurgical chez les enfants souffrant d'une OME.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre des essais du groupe Cochrane sur les troubles ORL, ainsi que dans d'autres bases de données électroniques et sources afin de recenser des essais publiés ou non (recherche la plus récente : 22 mars 2010).

Critères de sélection

Les essais contrôlés randomisés évaluant l'effet des drains transtympaniques.Les critères d'évaluation étudiés comprenaient le niveau d'audition, la durée d'effusion de l'oreille moyenne, le développement du langage et de la parole, le développement cognitif, le comportement et les effets indésirables.

Recueil et analyse des données

Les données ont été extraites des études par deux auteurs et vérifiées par d'autres.

Résultats Principaux

10 essais portant sur 1 728 participants ont été inclus. Certains essais randomisaient les enfants (drains transtympaniques versus absence de drains transtympaniques), d'autres effectuaient la randomisation à partir des oreilles (drain transtympanique dans une seule oreille).La gravité de l'OME chez les enfants variait entre les essais.Seule une étude par enfant (MRC : TARGET) présentaient des critères d'inclusion particulièrement rigoureux sur le plan de l'audiométrie.Aucun essai utilisant les drains transtympaniques à long terme n'a été identifié.

Les drains transtympaniques étaient surtout bénéfiques au cours des six premiers mois, période durant laquelle la guérison naturelle conduit à une amélioration de l'audition également chez les enfants soumis à aucun traitement chirurgical. Seul un essai de haute qualité randomisant les enfants (N = 211) rapportait les résultats à trois mois : le niveau d'audition moyen était de 12 dB de mieux (IC à 95 % entre 10 et 14 dB) chez ceux traités au moyen de drains transtympaniques par rapport aux témoins. Les méta-analyses de trois essais de haute qualité (N = 523) révélaient un bénéfice de 4 dB (IC à 95 % entre 2 et 6 dB) six à neuf mois après. Après 12 à 18 mois de suivi, aucune différence des niveaux d'audition moyens n'était observée.

Les données de trois études randomisant sur la base des oreilles (N = 230 oreilles) signalaient des effets similaires aux essais randomisant les enfants.Après quatre à six mois, le niveau d'audition moyen était de 10 dB de mieux dans l'oreille avec drain transtympanique (IC à 95 % entre 5 et 16 dB), puis après 7 à 12 mois et 18 à 24 mois, de 6 dB (IC à 95 % entre 2 et 10 dB) et 5dB (IC à 95 % entre 3 et 8 dB) de mieux.

Aucun effet n'était constaté concernant le développement du langage ou de la parole, ou pour les critères d'évaluation relatifs au comportement, au développement cognitif ou à la qualité de vie.

Une tympanosclérose était observée dans près d'un tiers des oreilles recevant un drain transtympanique.L'otorrhée était fréquente chez les nourrissons, mais chez les enfants plus âgés (de trois à sept ans), elle se produisait dans moins de 2 % des oreilles avec drain transtympanique, sur une période de deux ans de suivi.

Conclusions des auteurs

Chez les enfants atteints d'une OME, l'effet des drains transtympaniques sur l'audition, tel que mesuré par des examens normalisés, semble être faible et diminuer après six à neuf mois, période durant laquelle la guérison naturelle conduit aussi à une amélioration de l'audition chez les enfants non soumis à un traitement chirurgical.Aucun effet n'était observé sur les autres résultats liés à l'enfant, mais les données les concernant étaient peu nombreuses. Aucune étude n'a été réalisée auprès d'enfants présentant des problèmes de parole, de langage, d'apprentissage ou de développement, si bien qu'il n'est pas possible de tirer des conclusions à l'égard du traitement de ce type de patients.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Drains transtympaniques (tubes de ventilation) pour la perte auditive associée à l'otite moyenne avec effusion chez l'enfant

Drains transtympaniques (tubes de ventilation) pour la perte auditive associée à l'otite moyenne avec effusion chez l'enfant

Les preuves indiquent que les drains transtympaniques n'offrent qu'une amélioration de l'audition à court terme chez les enfants atteints d'une otite séreuse simple (otite moyenne avec effusion ou OME) et ne souffrant pas d'autres problèmes médicaux ou incapacités graves. Aucun effet sur la parole et sur le développement du langage n'a été constaté.

L'otite séreuse se caractérise par l'accumulation d'un liquide épais derrière la membrane tympanique. Il s'agit d'un trouble fréquent au cours de l'enfance. Il affecte une oreille, ou les deux, et constitue la principale cause de problèmes d'audition transitoires chez les enfants. L'insertion de drains transtympaniques (tubes de ventilation ou de tympanotomie) est une option de traitement chirurgical couramment utilisée afin d'améliorer l'audition chez les enfants souffrant d'une otite séreuse bilatérale, car l'otite séreuse unilatérale n'entraîne qu'une perte auditive minime, voire aucune. Cette revue a révélé que chez les enfants atteints d'une otite séreuse n'ayant pas disparue après 12 mois et associée à une perte auditive prolongée, l'effet bénéfique des drains transtympaniques sur l'audition était présent à six mois mais diminuait par la suite. La plupart des drains transtympaniques s'expulsent durant cette période et dès lors l'inflammation aura disparu dans la majorité des cas. Cette revue n'a découvert aucune preuve indiquant que les drains transtympaniques aident à la parole et au développement du langage oral, mais aucune étude n'a été réalisée chez des enfants souffrant de problèmes avérés de parole, de langage, d'apprentissage ou de développement. L'observation active semble être une stratégie de prise en charge adaptée à la majorité des enfants souffrant d'une otite séreuse bilatérale, car le liquide dans l'oreille moyenne disparaîtra spontanément dans la plupart des cas.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st February, 2013
Traduction financée par: Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux