Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Physical conditioning as part of a return to work strategy to reduce sickness absence for workers with back pain

  1. Frederieke G Schaafsma1,*,
  2. Karyn Whelan2,
  3. Allard J van der Beek3,
  4. Ludeke C van der Es-Lambeek4,
  5. Anneli Ojajärvi5,
  6. Jos H Verbeek6

Editorial Group: Cochrane Back Group

Published Online: 30 AUG 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 26 FEB 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001822.pub3


How to Cite

Schaafsma FG, Whelan K, van der Beek AJ, van der Es-Lambeek LC, Ojajärvi A, Verbeek JH. Physical conditioning as part of a return to work strategy to reduce sickness absence for workers with back pain. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 8. Art. No.: CD001822. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001822.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    VU University Medical Center, EMGO+ Institute, Department of Public and Occupational Health, Amsterdam, Netherlands

  2. 2

    Australian Catholic University, School of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Health Sciences, North Sydney, Australia

  3. 3

    VU University Medical Center, Department of Public and Occupational Health, EMGO Institute, Amsterdam, Netherlands

  4. 4

    CBO, Utrecht, Netherlands

  5. 5

    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Helsinki, Finland

  6. 6

    Finnish Institute of Occupational Health, Cochrane Occupational Safety and Health Review Group, Kuopio, Finland

*Frederieke G Schaafsma, Department of Public and Occupational Health, VU University Medical Center, EMGO+ Institute, Van der Boechorststraat 7 - room A524, Postbus 7057, Amsterdam, 1007 MB, Netherlands. f.schaafsma@vumc.nl.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 30 AUG 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Physical conditioning as part of a return to work strategy aims to improve work status for workers on sick leave due to back pain. This is the second update of a Cochrane Review (originally titled 'Work conditioning, work hardening and functional restoration for workers with back and neck pain') first published in 2003, updated in 2010, and updated again in 2013.

Objectives

To assess the effectiveness of physical conditioning as part of a return to work strategy in reducing time lost from work and improving work status for workers with back pain. Further, to assess which aspects of physical conditioning are related to a faster return to work for workers with back pain.

Search methods

We searched the following databases to March 2012: CENTRAL, MEDLINE (from 1966), EMBASE (from 1980), CINAHL (from 1982), PsycINFO (from 1967), and PEDro.

Selection criteria

Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and cluster RCTs that studied workers with work disability related to back pain and who were included in physical conditioning programmes.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration.

Main results

We included 41 articles reporting on 25 RCTs with 4404 participants. Risk of bias was low in 16 studies.

Three studies involved workers with acute back pain, eight studies workers with subacute back pain, and 14 studies workers with chronic back pain.

In 14 studies, physical conditioning as part of a return to work strategy was compared to usual care. The physical conditioning mostly consisted of graded activity with work-related exercises aimed at increasing back strength and flexibility, together with a set date for return to work. The programmes were divided into a light version with a maximum of five sessions, or an intense version with more than five sessions up to full time or as inpatient treatment.

For acute back pain, there was low quality evidence that both light and intense physical conditioning programmes made little or no difference in sickness absence duration compared with care as usual at three to 12 months follow-up (3 studies with 340 workers).

For subacute back pain, the evidence on the effectiveness of intense physical conditioning combined with care as usual compared to usual care alone was conflicting (four studies with 395 workers). However, subgroup analysis showed low quality evidence that if the intervention was executed at the workplace, or included a workplace visit, it may have reduced sickness absence duration at 12 months follow-up (3 studies with 283 workers; SMD -0.42, 95% CI -0.65 to -0.18).

For chronic back pain, there was low quality evidence that physical conditioning as part of integrated care management in addition to usual care may have reduced sickness absence days compared to usual care at 12 months follow-up (1 study, 134 workers; SMD -4.42, 95% CI -5.06 to -3.79). What part of the integrated care management was most effective remained unclear. There was moderate quality evidence that intense physical conditioning probably reduced sickness absence duration only slightly compared with usual care at 12 months follow-up (5 studies, 1093 workers; SMD -0.23, 95% CI -0.42 to -0.03).

Physical conditioning compared to exercise therapy showed conflicting results for workers with subacute and chronic back pain. Cognitive behavioural therapy was probably not superior to physical conditioning as an alternative or in addition to physical conditioning.

Authors' conclusions

The effectiveness of physical conditioning as part of a return to work strategy in reducing sick leave for workers with back pain, compared to usual care or exercise therapy, remains uncertain. For workers with acute back pain, physical conditioning may have no effect on sickness absence duration. There is conflicting evidence regarding the reduction of sickness absence duration with intense physical conditioning versus usual care for workers with subacute back pain. It may be that including workplace visits or execution of the intervention at the workplace is the component that renders a physical conditioning programme effective. For workers with chronic back pain physical conditioning has a small effect on reducing sick leave compared to care as usual after 12 months follow-up. To what extent physical conditioning as part of integrated care management may alter the effect on sick leave for workers with chronic back pain needs further research.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Physical conditioning as part of a return to work strategy to reduce sickness absence for workers with back pain

Review question

We reviewed the evidence about the effect of physical conditioning as part of a return to work strategy in people with low back pain. We found 25 studies.

Background

The main goal of physical conditioning as part of a return to work strategy, sometimes called work conditioning, work hardening or functional restoration and exercise programmes, is to return injured or disabled workers to work or improve the work status for workers performing modified duties. Such programmes may also simulate or duplicate work or functional tasks, or both, using exercises in a safe, supervised environment. These exercises or tasks are structured and progressively graded to increase psychological, physical and emotional tolerance and to improve endurance and work feasibility. In such environments, injured workers improve their general physical condition through an exercise programme aimed at increasing strength, endurance, flexibility and cardiovascular fitness. We wanted to discover whether physical conditioning was more or less effective than usual care and other types of interventions like exercise therapy.

Study characteristics

The evidence was current to March 2012. We analysed 17 comparisons of physical conditioning as part of a return to work strategy. Some trials examined physical conditioning in addition to care as usual versus care as usual only, and others compared physical conditioning to other types of interventions such as standard exercise therapy. Participants had either acute back pain (duration of symptoms less than six weeks), subacute back pain (duration of symptoms more than six but less than 12 weeks), or chronic back pain (duration of symptoms more than 12 weeks). Participants were followed for anywhere from three weeks to three years. We divided physical conditioning into light or intense, depending on its intensity and duration.

Key results

Results showed that light physical conditioning has no effect on sickness absence duration for workers with subacute or chronic back pain. We found conflicting results for intense physical conditioning for workers with subacute back pain. Intense physical conditioning probably had a small effect on reducing sick leave at 12 months follow-up compared to usual care for workers with chronic back pain. Involving the workplace, or physical conditioning being part of integrated care management may have had a positive effect on reducing sick leave, but this needs further research.

Quality of the evidence

The quality of the evidence ranged from very low to moderate. Although 16 of the included studies were well designed and had no major flaws, some studies were poorly conducted and the small number of participants in most studies lowered the overall quality of the evidence.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Réadaptation physique dans le cadre d'une stratégie de retour au travail pour réduire les congés de maladie chez les travailleurs souffrant de dorsalgies

Contexte

La réadaptation physique dans le cadre d'une stratégie de retour au travail vise à améliorer le statut professionnel des travailleurs en congé de maladie pour dorsalgies. Cette revue est la deuxième mise à jour d'une revue Cochrane (intitulée à l'origine « Réadaptation au travail, endurcissement au travail et restauration fonctionnelle pour les travailleurs ayant une rachialgie ou une cervicalgie ») publiée pour la première fois en 2003, mise à jour en 2010, et de nouveau mise à jour en 2013.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité de la réadaptation physique dans le cadre d'une stratégie de retour au travail pour réduire la durée de l'absence au travail et améliorer le statut professionnel des travailleurs souffrant de dorsalgies. En outre, évaluer quels aspects de la réadaptation physique sont associés à un retour au travail plus rapide des travailleurs souffrant de dorsalgies.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans les bases de données suivantes jusqu'au mois de mars 2012 : CENTRAL, MEDLINE (depuis 1966), EMBASE (depuis 1980), CINAHL (depuis 1982), PsycINFO (depuis 1967), et PEDro.

Critères de sélection

Les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) et les ECR en grappes ayant étudié les travailleurs atteints d'une invalidité professionnelle liée aux dorsalgies et qui avaient été inscrits dans des programmes de réadaptation physique.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont extrait les données et évalué le risque de biais de façon indépendante. Nous avons utilisé les procédures méthodologiques standard prévues par The Cochrane Collaboration.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus 41 articles rendant compte de 25 ECR avec 4 404 participants. Les risques de biais étaient faibles dans 16 études.

Trois études ont impliqué des travailleurs souffrant de dorsalgies aiguës, huit études ont porté sur des travailleurs souffrant de dorsalgies subaiguës, et 14 études sur des travailleurs souffrant de dorsalgies chroniques.

Dans 14 études, la réadaptation physique dans le cadre d'une stratégie de retour au travail a été comparée aux soins habituels. La réadaptation physique consistait essentiellement en activité classée avec des exercices liés au travail visant à augmenter la résistance et la souplesse du dos, associée à une date fixée pour le retour au travail. Les programmes ont été divisés en une version allégée avec un maximum de cinq séances, ou une version intense avec plus de cinq séances jusqu'au temps plein ou en traitement en milieu hospitalier.

Pour les dorsalgies aiguës, il y avait des preuves de faible qualité que les programmes de réadaptation physique allégée et intense n'avaient modifié que très peu ou n'avaient rien changé à la durée des congés de maladie comparés aux soins habituels au bout de 3 à 12 mois de suivi (3 études impliquant 340 travailleurs).

Pour les dorsalgies subaiguës, les preuves sur l'efficacité de la réadaptation physique intense combinée aux soins habituels comparativement aux soins habituels seuls étaient contradictoires (quatre études avec 395 travailleurs). Toutefois, l'analyse en sous-groupes a révélé des preuves de faible qualité indiquant que si l'intervention avait été mise en œuvre sur le lieu de travail, ou incluait une visite sur le lieu de travail, cela a pu réduire la durée des congés de maladie au bout de 12 mois de suivi (3 études avec 283 travailleurs ; DMS -0,42, IC à 95 % -0,65 à -0,18).

Pour les dorsalgies chroniques, il y avait des preuves de faible qualité que la réadaptation physique dans le cadre de la prise en charge des soins intégrés en complément des soins habituels peut avoir réduit le nombre de jours de congé de maladie comparativement aux soins habituels au bout de 12 mois de suivi (1 étude, 134 travailleurs ; DMS -4,42, IC à 95 % -5,06 à -3,79). Mais on ignore encore quelle partie de la prise en charge des soins intégrés a été la plus efficace. Il existait des preuves de qualité modérée que la réadaptation physique intense a probablement réduit la durée des congés de maladie au bout de 12 mois de suivi (5 études avec 1 093 travailleurs ; DMS -0,23, IC à 95 % -0,42 à -0,03).

La réadaptation physique comparée à la thérapie d'exercice a donné des résultats contradictoires pour les travailleurs souffrant de dorsalgies subaiguës et chroniques. La thérapie cognitivo-comportementale n'était probablement pas supérieure à la réadaptation physique comme alternative ou en complément de la réadaptation physique.

Conclusions des auteurs

L'efficacité de la réadaptation physique dans le cadre d'une stratégie de retour au travail pour réduire les congés de maladie des travailleurs souffrant de dorsalgies, comparée aux soins habituels ou à la thérapie d'exercice, reste indéterminée. Pour les travailleurs souffrant de dorsalgies aiguës, la réadaptation physique peut n'avoir aucun effet sur la durée des congés de maladie. Il existe des preuves contradictoires concernant la réduction de la durée de congé de maladie avec la réadaptation physique intense par rapport aux soins habituels pour les travailleurs souffrant de dorsalgies subaiguës. Cela peut tenir au fait que l'inclusion de visites sur le lieu de travail ou l'exécution de l'intervention sur le lieu de travail soit la composante qui rende un programme de réadaptation physique efficace. Pour les travailleurs souffrant de dorsalgies chroniques, la réadaptation physique produit un petit effet sur la réduction du congé de maladie par rapport aux soins habituels au bout de 12 mois de suivi. Il est nécessaire de mener d'autres recherches pour déterminer dans quelle mesure la réadaptation physique dans le cadre de la prise en charge des soins intégrés peut altérer l'effet sur le congé de maladie pour les travailleurs souffrant de dorsalgies chroniques.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Réadaptation physique dans le cadre d'une stratégie de retour au travail pour réduire les congés de maladie chez les travailleurs souffrant de dorsalgies

Réadaptation physique dans le cadre d'une stratégie de retour au travail pour réduire les congés de maladie chez les travailleurs souffrant de dorsalgies

Question de la revue

Nous avons passé en revue les preuves de l'effet de la réadaptation physique dans le cadre d'une stratégie de retour au travail chez les gens souffrant de lombalgies. Nous avons trouvé 25 études.

Contexte

L'objectif principal de la réadaptation physique dans le cadre d'une stratégie de retour au travail, parfois désigné par programmes de réadaptation au travail, endurcissement au travail ou restauration fonctionnelle et d'exercices physiques, est de remettre au travail les employés blessés ou handicapés ou d'améliorer le statut professionnel des travailleurs exécutant des tâches modifiées. De tels programmes peuvent aussi simuler ou reproduire le travail ou les tâches fonctionnelles, ou les deux, en utilisant les exercices dans un environnement contrôlé et sûr. Ces exercices ou ces tâches sont structurés et progressivement classés pour augmenter la tolérance psychologique, physique et émotionnelle et pour améliorer l'endurance et la faisabilité du travail. Dans de tels environnements, les travailleurs accidentés améliorent leur condition physique générale grâce à un programme d'exercices visant à augmenter la résistance, l'endurance, la souplesse et le tonus cardiovasculaire. Nous voulions découvrir si la réadaptation physique était plus ou moins efficace que les soins habituels et d'autres types d'interventions comme la thérapie d'exercice.

Caractéristiques des études

Cette recherche est à jour jusqu'à mars 2012. Nous avons analysé 17 comparaisons de la réadaptation physique dans le cadre d'une stratégie de retour au travail. Certains essais ont comparé la réadaptation physique en complément des soins habituels par rapport aux soins habituels uniquement, et d'autres ont comparé la réadaptation physique à d'autres types d'interventions telles que la thérapie d'exercice standard. Les participants souffraient de dorsalgies aiguës (durée des symptômes inférieure à six semaines), de dorsalgies subaiguës (durée des symptômes supérieure à six semaines mais inférieure à 12 semaines), ou de dorsalgies chroniques (durée des symptômes supérieure à 12 semaines). Les participants ont fait l'objet d'un suivi à tous les niveaux pendant une période de surveillance de trois semaines à trois ans. Nous avons réparti la réadaptation physique entre légère et intense, en fonction de son intensité et de sa durée.

Principaux résultats

Les résultats ont montré que la réadaptation physique légère n'a aucun effet sur la durée des congés de maladie chez les travailleurs souffrant de dorsalgies subaiguës ou chroniques. Nous avons trouvé des résultats contradictoires pour la réadaptation physique intense chez les travailleurs souffrant de dorsalgies subaiguës. La réadaptation physique intense a probablement produit un petit effet sur la réduction des congés de maladie au bout de 12 mois de suivi comparé aux soins habituels chez les travailleurs souffrant de dorsalgies chroniques. Il est possible que l'implication du lieu de travail, ou la réadaptation physique dans le cadre de la prise en charge des soins intégrés ait eu un effet positif sur la réduction des congés de maladie, mais cela doit être confirmé par des recherches supplémentaires.

Qualité des preuves

La qualité des preuves était très faible à modérée. Même si 16 des études incluses étaient bien conçues et ne comportaient pas de défauts méthodologiques majeurs, certaines études ont été menées de façon médiocre et le petit nombre de participants dans la plupart des études a affaibli la qualité globale des preuves.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 16th October, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.