Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Sealants for preventing dental decay in the permanent teeth

  1. Anneli Ahovuo-Saloranta1,*,
  2. Helena Forss2,
  3. Tanya Walsh3,
  4. Anne Hiiri4,
  5. Anne Nordblad5,
  6. Marjukka Mäkelä6,
  7. Helen V Worthington7

Editorial Group: Cochrane Oral Health Group

Published Online: 28 MAR 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 1 NOV 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001830.pub4


How to Cite

Ahovuo-Saloranta A, Forss H, Walsh T, Hiiri A, Nordblad A, Mäkelä M, Worthington HV. Sealants for preventing dental decay in the permanent teeth. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 3. Art. No.: CD001830. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001830.pub4.

Author Information

  1. 1

    National Institute for Health and Welfare / THL, Finnish Office for Health Technology Assessment / FinOHTA, Tampere, Finland

  2. 2

    Tampere University Hospital, Department of Oral and Dental Diseases, Tampere, Finland

  3. 3

    School of Dentistry, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK

  4. 4

    City of Kotka, Department of Health Care, Kotka, Finland

  5. 5

    Ministry of Social Affairs and Health, Health Department, Helsinki, Finland

  6. 6

    National Institute for Health and Welfare / THL, Finnish Office for Health Technology Assessment / FinOHTA, Helsinki, Finland

  7. 7

    School of Dentistry, The University of Manchester, Cochrane Oral Health Group, Manchester, UK

*Anneli Ahovuo-Saloranta, Finnish Office for Health Technology Assessment / FinOHTA, National Institute for Health and Welfare / THL, Finn-Medi 3, Biokatu 10, Tampere, FI-33520, Finland. anneli.ahovuo-saloranta@thl.fi.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 28 MAR 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Dental sealants were introduced in the 1960s to help prevent dental caries in the pits and fissures of mainly the occlusal tooth surfaces. Sealants act to prevent the growth of bacteria that can lead to dental decay. There is evidence to suggest that fissure sealants are effective in preventing caries in children and adolescents when compared to no sealants. Their effectiveness may be related to the caries prevalence in the population.

Objectives

To compare the effects of different types of fissure sealants in preventing caries in permanent teeth in children and adolescents.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 1 November 2012); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 7); MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 1 November 2012); EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 1 November 2012); SCISEARCH, CAplus, INSPEC, NTIS and PASCAL via STN Easy (to 1 September 2012); and DARE, NHS EED and HTA (via the CAIRS web interface to 29 March 2012 and thereafter via Metaxis interface to September 2012). There were no language or publication restrictions. We also searched for ongoing trials via ClinicalTrials.gov (to 23 July 2012).

Selection criteria

Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials of at least 12 months duration comparing sealants for preventing caries of occlusal or approximal surfaces of premolar or molar teeth with no sealant or different type of sealant in children and adolescents under 20 years of age.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently screened search results, extracted data and assessed trial quality. We calculated the odds ratio (OR) for caries or no caries on occlusal surfaces of permanent molar teeth. For trials with a split-mouth design, the Becker-Balagtas odds ratio was used. For mean caries increment we used the mean difference. All measures are presented with 95% confidence intervals (CI).
The quality of the evidence was assessed using GRADE methods.
We conducted the meta-analyses using a random-effects model for those comparisons where there were more than three trials in the same comparison, otherwise the fixed-effect model was used.

Main results

Thirty-four trials are included in the review. Twelve trials evaluated the effects of sealant compared with no sealant (2575 participants) (one of those 12 trials stated only number of tooth pairs); 21 trials evaluated one type of sealant compared with another (3202 participants); and one trial evaluated two different types of sealant and no sealant (752 participants). Children were aged from 5 to 16 years. Trials rarely reported the background exposure to fluoride of the trial participants or the baseline caries prevalence.

- Resin-based sealant compared with no sealant: Compared to control without sealant, second or third or fourth generation resin-based sealants prevented caries in first permanent molars in children aged 5 to 10 years (at 2 years of follow-up odds ratio (OR) 0.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.07 to 0.19, six trials (five published in the 1970s and one in 2012), at low risk of bias, 1259 children randomised, 1066 children evaluated, moderate quality evidence). If we were to assume that 40% of the control tooth surfaces were decayed during 2 years of follow-up (400 carious teeth per 1000), then applying a resin-based sealant will reduce the proportion of the carious surfaces to 6.25% (95% CI 3.84% to 9.63%); similarly if we were to assume that 70% of the control tooth surfaces were decayed  (700 carious teeth per 1000), then applying a resin-based sealant will reduce the proportion of the carious surfaces to 18.92% (95% CI 12.28% to 27.18%). This caries preventive effect was maintained at longer follow-up but both the quality and quantity of the evidence was reduced (e.g. at 48 to 54 months of follow-up OR 0.21, 95% CI 0.16 to 0.28, four trials (two studies at low risk of bias and two studies at high risk of bias), 482 children evaluated; risk ratio (RR) 0.24, 95% CI 0.12 to 0.45, one study at unclear risk of bias, 203 children evaluated).

- Glass ionomer sealant compared with no sealant: There is insufficient evidence to make any conclusions about whether glass ionomer sealants, prevent caries compared to no sealant at 24-month follow-up (mean difference in DFS -0.18, 95% CI -0.39 to 0.03, one trial at unclear risk of bias, 452 children randomised, 404 children evaluated, very low quality evidence).

- Sealant compared with another sealant: The relative effectiveness of different types of sealants remained inconclusive in this review.
Twenty-one trials directly compared two different sealant materials. Several different comparisons were made according to type of sealant, outcome measure and duration of follow-up. There was great variation with regard to comparisons, outcomes, time of outcomes reported and background fluoride exposure if this was reported.

Fifteen trials compared glass ionomer with resin sealants and there is insufficient evidence to make any conclusions about the superiority of either of the two materials. Although there were 15 trials the event rate was very low in many of these which restricted their contribution to the results.

Three trials compared resin-modified glass ionomer with resin sealant and reported inconsistent results.

Two small low quality trials compared polyacid-modified resin sealants with resin sealants and found no difference in caries after 2 years.

- Adverse effects: Only two trials mentioned adverse effects and stated that no adverse effects were reported by participants.

Authors' conclusions

The application of sealants is a recommended procedure to prevent or control caries. Sealing the occlusal surfaces of permanent molars in children and adolescents reduces caries up to 48 months when compared to no sealant, after longer follow-up the quantity and quality of the evidence is reduced. The review revealed that sealants are effective in high risk children but information on the magnitude of the benefit of sealing in other conditions is scarce. The relative effectiveness of different types of sealants has yet to be established.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Sealants for preventing dental decay in the permanent teeth

Although children and adolescents of today have more healthy teeth than in the past, tooth decay (dental caries) is still a problem in some individuals and populations, and in fact affects a large number of people around the world. The majority of decay in children and adolescents is concentrated on the biting surfaces of back teeth. The preventive treatment options for tooth decay include tooth brushing, fluoride supplements (for example chewing gums) and topical fluoride applications and dental sealants which are applied at dental clinics.

Because prevention of dental caries is important from a public health point of view the Cochrane Oral Health Group undertook a review of existing research into whether or not the use of dental sealants prevents dental decay. Thirty-four trials were included in this review,children and young people taking part were aged from 5 to 16 years and represented the general population.

The search of studies was updated on 1st November 2012.

Dental sealants are intended to prevent the growth of bacteria that promote tooth decay in grooves of back teeth. Sealants are applied onto these grooves by a dentist or by another member of the dental care team. There are several sealant materials available, the main types in use are resin-based sealants and glass ionomer cements.

This review summarised information from 34 separate studies involving 6529 young people to whom a variety of dental sealants were used for preventing caries and found evidence that applying sealants to the biting surfaces of the back teeth reduces caries when compared to not using sealants.

Twelve of the 34 studies compared resin-based sealants to no sealants and found that children who have their back teeth covered by a sealant are less likely to have dental decay in their back teeth than children without sealant. For example, if 40% of back teeth develop decay over a 2-year period then the sealant reduces this to 6%. In another group of children where 70% of these back teeth would develop decay over a 2-year period, using sealants reduces this to 19%. These results are based on data from six studies (five of which were published in the 1970s) where the children were aged 5 to 10 years when the sealants were placed. Similar benefits for resin-based sealants were shown up to 9 years. There was no clear benefit of one type of sealant over another when they were compared with each other.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

La colle pour la prévention des caries dentaires dans les dents définitives

Contexte

Les colles dentaires ont été introduites dans les années 1960 pour faciliter la prévention des caries dentaires dans les puits et fissures principalement des surfaces dentaires occlusales. L'action des colles consiste à prévenir la croissance des bactéries susceptibles de favoriser la formation de caries dentaires. Des preuves suggèrent que les colles pour fissures sont efficaces pour prévenir la formation de caries chez l'enfant et l'adolescent par rapport à l'absence de colle. Leur efficacité peut être reliée à la prévalence des caries dans la population.

Objectifs

Comparer les effets de différents types de colles pour fissures pour prévenir la formation de caries dans les dents définitives chez l'enfant et l'adolescent.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué une recherche dans le registre des essais du groupe Cochrane sur la santé bucco-dentaire (jusqu'au 1er novembre 2012) ; le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2012, numéro 7) ; MEDLINE via OVID (de 1946 jusqu'au 1er novembre 2012) ; EMBASE via OVID (de 1980 jusqu'au 1er novembre 2012) ; SCISEARCH, CAplus, INSPEC, NTIS et PASCAL via STN Easy (jusqu'au 1er septembre 2012) ; et DARE, NHS EED et HTA (via l'interface Web CAIRS jusqu'au 29 mars 2012 et par la suite via l'interface Metaxis jusqu'au mois de septembre 2012). Il n'y avait aucune restriction concernant la langue ou la publication. Nous avons également recherché des essais en cours via ClinicalTrials.gov (jusqu'au 23 juillet 2012).

Critères de sélection

Des essais contrôlés randomisés ou quasi-randomisés d'une durée d'au moins 12 mois comparant les colles destinées à prévenir la formation de caries sur les surfaces occlusales ou les faces proximales des prémolaires ou molaires avec l'absence de colle ou différents types de colle chez l'enfant et l'adolescent de moins de 20 ans.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment passé au crible les résultats des recherches, extrait les données et évalué la qualité méthodologique des essais. Nous avons calculé le rapport des cotes (RC) pour les caries ou l'absence de carie sur les surfaces occlusales des molaires définitives. Pour les essais ayant une conception en bouche fractionnée, le rapport des cotes Becker-Balagtas a été utilisé. Pour l'augmentation moyenne des caries, nous avons utilisé la différence moyenne. Toutes les mesures sont présentées avec un intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 %.
La qualité des données a été évaluée au moyen de l'échelle GRADE.
Nous avons réalisé les méta-analyses en utilisant un modèle à effets aléatoires pour les comparaisons comprenant plus de trois essais dans la même comparaison. Un modèle à effets fixes était utilisé dans les autres cas.

Résultats Principaux

Trente-quatre essais ont été inclus dans la revue. Douze essais ont évalué les effets de la colle comparée à l'absence de colle (2 575 participants) (un de ces 12 essais n'a indiqué que le nombre de paires de dents) ; 21 essais ont évalué un type de colle comparé à un autre (3 202 participants) ; et un essai a évalué deux différents types de colle et l'absence de colle (752 participants). Les enfants étaient âgés de 5 à 16 ans. Les essais ont rarement rapporté l'exposition naturelle au fluorure des participants aux essais ou la prévalence des caries à l'inclusion.

- La colle à base de résine comparée à l'absence de colle : Comparativement au témoin sans colle, des colles à base de résine de deuxième ou troisième ou quatrième génération ont prévenu la formation de caries dans les premières molaires définitives chez les enfants âgés de 5 à 10 ans (au bout de 2 ans de suivi, rapport des cotes (RC) 0,12, intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % 0,07 à 0,19, six essais (cinq publiés dans les années 1970 et un en 2012), présentant un faible risque de biais, 1 259 enfants randomisés, 1 066 enfants évalués, preuves de qualité modérée). Si nous avions estimé que 40 % des surfaces dentaires témoins avaient des caries au cours des 2 ans de suivi (400 dents cariées pour 1 000), alors l'application d'une colle à base de résine devait réduire la proportion des surfaces cariées jusqu'à 6,25 % (IC à 95 % 3,84 % à 9,63 %) ; de même, si nous avions estimé que 70 % des surfaces dentaires témoins avaient des caries (700 dents cariées pour 1 000), alors l'application d'une colle à base de résine devait réduire la proportion des surfaces cariées jusqu'à 18,92 % (IC à 95 % 12,28 % à 27,18 %). Cet effet de prévention des caries a été maintenu pendant un suivi de plus longue durée, mais la qualité et la quantité des preuves étaient toutes deux réduites (par exemple au bout de 48 à 54 mois de suivi, RC 0,21, IC à 95 % 0,16 à 0,28, quatre essais (deux études à faible risque de biais et deux études à risque élevé de biais), 482 enfants évalués ; risque relatif (RR) 0,24, IC à 95 % 0,12 à 0,45, une étude à risque de biais incertain, 203 enfants évalués).

- La colle à base de verre ionomère comparée à l'absence de colle : Les preuves sont insuffisantes pour tirer toute conclusion sur l'efficacité des colles à base de verre ionomère pour prévenir la formation de caries comparées à l'absence de colle au bout de 24 mois de suivi (différence moyenne de la SSM -0,18, IC à 95 % -0,39 à 0,03, un essai à risque de biais incertain, 452 enfants randomisés, 404 enfants évalués, preuves de très faible qualité).

- Une colle comparée à une autre colle : L'efficacité relative des différents types de colles reste peu concluante dans cette revue.
Vingt-et-un essais ont directement comparé deux différents matériaux de colle. Plusieurs comparaisons différentes ont été effectuées selon le type de colle, les résultats mesurés et la durée de suivi. Il existait une grande variation pour ce qui est des comparaisons, des résultats, du moment où les résultats ont été rapportés et de l'exposition naturelle au fluorure, si celle-ci avait été rapportée.

Quinze essais ont comparé les colles à base de verre ionomère aux colles à base de résine et les preuves sont insuffisantes pour tirer toute conclusion concernant l'efficacité supérieure de l'un des deux matériaux. Même s'il y avait 15 essais, le taux d'événements était très faible dans beaucoup d'entre eux, ce qui a limité leur contribution aux résultats.

Trois essais ont comparé la colle à base de verre ionomère modifié par la résine à la colle à base de résine et ont rapporté des résultats contradictoires.

Deux essais de faible qualité à petite échelle ont comparé des colles à base de résine modifiée par un polyacide aux colles à base de résine et n'ont trouvé aucune différence dans les caries au bout de 2 ans.

- Effets indésirables : Deux essais seulement ont mentionné des effets indésirables et indiqué qu'aucun effet indésirable n'avait été rapporté par les participants.

Conclusions des auteurs

L'application des colles est une procédure recommandée pour prévenir ou lutter contre les caries. Le fait de coller les surfaces occlusales des molaires définitives chez les enfants et les adolescents réduit la formation des caries pendant 48 mois comparativement à l'absence de colle ; au bout d'un suivi de plus longue durée, la quantité et la qualité des preuves sont limitées. La revue a révélé que les colles sont efficaces chez les enfants à risque élevé, mais les informations sur l'ampleur des effets bénéfiques de la colle dans d'autres maladies sont rares. L'efficacité relative des différents types de colle n'est pas encore établie.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

La colle pour la prévention des caries dentaires dans les dents définitives

La colle pour la prévention des caries dentaires dans les dents définitives

Bien que les enfants et les adolescents d'aujourd'hui aient des dents plus saines que dans le passé, la carie dentaire est toujours un problème pour certains individus et certaines populations, et touche en réalité un grand nombre de personnes partout dans le monde. La majorité des caries chez l'enfant et l'adolescent se concentrent sur les surfaces de mastication des dents postérieures. Les options de traitement préventif pour la carie dentaire comprennent le brossage des dents, les suppléments de fluor (par exemple des gommes à mâcher) et des applications de fluorure topique et des colles dentaires qui sont appliquées dans des cliniques dentaires.

Comme la prévention des caries dentaires est importante du point de vue de la santé publique, le groupe Cochrane sur la santé bucco-dentaire a entrepris une revue des recherches existantes pour déterminer si l'utilisation des colles dentaires prévient la formation de caries dentaires. Trente-quatre essais ont été inclus dans cette revue, les enfants et les jeunes gens y participant étaient âgés de 5 à 16 ans et représentaient la population générale.

La recherche d'études a été mise à jour le 1er novembre 2012.

Les colles dentaires sont destinées à prévenir la croissance des bactéries qui favorisent la formation de caries dentaires dans les sillons occlusaux des dents postérieures. Les colles sont appliquées par-dessus ces sillons occlusaux par un dentiste ou par un autre membre de l'équipe en charge des caries dentaires. Plusieurs matériaux de colle sont disponibles, les principaux types utilisés sont des colles à base de résine et des ciments de verre ionomère.

Cette revue a résumé les informations issues de 34 études séparées totalisant 6 529 jeunes gens chez qui différentes colles dentaires ont été utilisées pour prévenir la formation de caries et a trouvé des preuves que l'application des colles sur les surfaces de mastication des dents postérieures réduit les caries comparativement à la non-utilisation de colles.

12 études sur les 34 ont comparé des colles à base de résine à l'absence de colle et ont trouvé que les enfants dont les dents postérieures sont recouvertes avec une colle sont moins susceptibles d'avoir une carie dentaire dans les dents postérieures que les enfants n'ayant pas de colle sur leurs dents. Par exemple, si 40 % des dents postérieures développent une carie sur une période de 2 ans, la colle permet alors de réduire ce pourcentage jusqu'à 6 %. Dans un autre groupe d'enfants où 70 % de ces dents postérieures devaient développer des caries sur une période de 2 ans, l'utilisation des colles réduit ce pourcentage jusqu'à 19 %. Ces résultats sont fondés sur des données issues de six études (dont cinq ont été publiées dans les années 1970) dans lesquelles les enfants étaient âgés de 5 à 10 ans quand les colles ont été appliquées sur leurs dents. Des effets bénéfiques similaires avec les colles à base de résine ont été démontrés sur une période de 9 ans. Il n'y avait aucun effet bénéfique clair d'un type de colle par rapport à un autre lors des comparaisons des uns aux autres.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 22nd March, 2013
Traduction financée par: Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux pour la France: Minist�re en charge de la Sant�