Intervention Review

Conservative management for postprostatectomy urinary incontinence

  1. Susan E Campbell2,
  2. Cathryn MA Glazener3,
  3. Kathleen F Hunter1,*,
  4. June D Cody4,
  5. Katherine N Moore5

Editorial Group: Cochrane Incontinence Group

Published Online: 18 JAN 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 24 AUG 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001843.pub4

How to Cite

Campbell SE, Glazener CMA, Hunter KF, Cody JD, Moore KN. Conservative management for postprostatectomy urinary incontinence. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD001843. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001843.pub4.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Alberta, Faculty of Nursing, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

  2. 2

    University of East Anglia, School of Nursing Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Norwich, UK

  3. 3

    University of Aberdeen, Health Services Research Unit, Aberdeen, Scotland, UK

  4. 4

    University of Aberdeen, Cochrane Incontinence Review Group, Foresterhill, Aberdeen, UK

  5. 5

    University of Alberta, Faculty of Nursing, Alberta, Canada

*Kathleen F Hunter, Faculty of Nursing, University of Alberta, 3rd Floor Clinical Sciences Building, Edmonton, Alberta, T6G 2G3, Canada. kathleen.hunter@ualberta.ca.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (conclusions changed)
  2. Published Online: 18 JAN 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Urinary incontinence is common after both radical prostatectomy and transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). Conservative management includes pelvic floor muscle training with or without biofeedback, electrical stimulation, extra-corporeal magnetic innervation (ExMI), compression devices (penile clamps), lifestyle changes, or a combination of methods.

Objectives

To assess the effects of conservative management for urinary incontinence after prostatectomy.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Register (searched 24 August 2011), EMBASE (January 1980 to Week 48 2009), CINAHL (January 1982 to 20 November 2009), the reference lists of relevant articles, handsearched conference proceedings and contacted investigators to locate studies.

Selection criteria

Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials evaluating conservative interventions for urinary continence in men after prostatectomy.

Data collection and analysis

Two or more review authors assessed the methodological quality of trials and abstracted data. We tried to contact several authors of included studies to obtain extra information.

Main results

Thirty-seven trials met the inclusion criteria, 33 amongst men after radical prostatectomy, three trials after transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) and one trial after either operation. The trials included 3399 men, of whom 1937 had an active conservative intervention.  There was considerable variation in the interventions, populations and outcome measures.  Data were not available for many of the pre-stated outcomes.  Men's symptoms improved over time irrespective of management. Adverse effects did not occur or were not reported.

There was no evidence from eight trials that pelvic floor muscle training with or without biofeedback was better than control for men who had urinary incontinence after radical prostatectomy (e.g. 57% with urinary incontinence versus 62% in the control group, risk ratio (RR) for incontinence after 12 months 0.85, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.60 to 1.22) as the confidence intervals were wide, reflecting uncertainty. However, one large multicentre trial of one-to-one therapy showed no difference in any urinary or quality of life outcome measures and had narrower confidence intervals. There was also no evidence of benefit for erectile dysfunction (56% with no erection in the pelvic floor muscle training group versus 55% in the control group after one year, RR 1.01, 95% CI 0.84 to 1.20). Individual small trials provided data to suggest that electrical stimulation, external magnetic innervation or combinations of treatments might be beneficial but the evidence was limited. 

One large trial demonstrated that there was no benefit for incontinence or erectile dysfunction from a one-to-one pelvic floor muscle training based intervention to men who were incontinent after transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) (e.g. 65% with urinary incontinence versus 62% in the control group, RR after 12 months 1.05, 95% CI 0.91 to 1.23).

In eight trials of conservative treatment of all men after radical prostatectomy aimed at both treatment and prevention, there was an overall benefit from pelvic floor muscle training versus control management in terms of reduction of UI (e.g. 10% with urinary incontinence after one year versus 32% in the control groups, RR for urinary incontinence 0.32, 95% CI 0.20 to 0.51). However, this finding was not supported by other data from pad tests. The findings should be treated with caution, as most trials were of poor to moderate quality and confidence intervals were wide. 

Men in one trial were more satisfied with one type of external compression device, which had the lowest urine loss, compared to two others or no treatment. The effect of other conservative interventions such as lifestyle changes remains undetermined as no trials involving these interventions were identified.

Authors' conclusions

The value of the various approaches to conservative management of postprostatectomy incontinence after radical prostatectomy remains uncertain. It seems unlikely that men benefit from one-to-one pelvic floor muscle training therapy after transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP).  Long-term incontinence may be managed by external penile clamp, but there are safety problems.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Conservative management for men with urinary incontinence after prostate surgery

The prostate is a male sex gland that surrounds the outlet of the bladder. Two main diseases of the prostate (cancer of the prostate, and benign (non cancerous) prostatic enlargement) can be treated by surgery but some men suffer leakage of urine (urinary incontinence) afterwards. Conservative treatment of the leakage, such as pelvic floor muscle training with or without biofeedback or anal electrical stimulation are thought to help men control this leakage. The review of trials found that there was conflicting evidence about the benefit of therapists teaching men to contract their pelvic floor muscles for either prevention or treatment of urine leakage after radical prostate surgery for cancer. However, information from one large trial suggested that men do not benefit from seeing a therapist to receive pelvic floor muscle training after transurethral resection (TURP) for benign prostatic enlargement. Of three external compression devices tested, one penile clamp seemed to be better than the others but needs to be used cautiously because of safety risks. More research of better quality is needed to assess conservative management.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Prise en charge conservatrice de l'incontinence urinaire post-prostatectomie

Contexte

L'incontinence urinaire est courante. Elle survient suite à une prostatectomie et une résection transurétrale de la prostate (RTUP). La gestion conservatrice consiste à suivre une formation aux exercices de renforcement des muscles du plancher pelvien avec ou sans rétroaction biologique, stimulation électrique, innervation magnétique extracorporelle (IMEx), dispositifs de compression (pinces péniennes), changements appliqués au mode de vie ou une combinaison de ces méthodes.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets de la gestion conservatrice en cas d'incontinence urinaire suite à une prostatectomie.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur l'incontinence (recherches du 24 août 2011), EMBASE (janvier 1980 à la semaine 48 de 2009), CINAHL (janvier 1982 au 20 novembre 2009), les listes bibliographiques des articles pertinents. Nous avons également effectué des recherches manuelles dans les actes de conférence et contacté les investigateurs afin d'identifier les études.

Critères de sélection

Des essais contrôlés randomisés ou quasi-randomisés évaluant des interventions conservatrices pour le traitement de l'incontinence urinaire chez les hommes suite à une prostatectomie.

Recueil et analyse des données

Au moins deux auteurs de la revue ont évalué la qualité méthodologique des essais et des données extraites. Nous avons essayé de contacter plusieurs auteurs des études incluses afin d'obtenir des informations complémentaires.

Résultats Principaux

Trente-sept essais répondaient aux critères d'inclusion, 33 ont été réalisés chez des hommes suite à une prostatectomie radicale, trois essais après une résection transurétrale de la prostate (RTUP) et un essai après l'une ou l'autre des interventions. Les essais rassemblaient 3 399 hommes, dont 1 937 avaient subi une intervention conservatrice active. Les différentes interventions, populations et mesures de résultats variaient considérablement. Les données n'étaient pas disponibles pour plusieurs des résultats prémentionnés. Les symptômes se sont améliorés au fil du temps, indépendamment de la gestion. Aucun effet indésirable ne s'est produit ou n'a été signalé.

Dans huit essais, aucune preuve n'a permis de démontrer que la formation aux exercices de renforcement des muscles du plancher pelvien avec ou sans rétroaction biologique était plus efficace que le contrôle chez les hommes souffrant d'incontinence urinaire suite à une prostatectomie radicale (par ex. 57 % des hommes souffrant d'incontinence urinaire contre 62 % dans le groupe témoin, risque relatif (RR) d'incontinence au bout de 12 mois de 0,85, intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % 0,60 à 1,22) étant donné que les intervalles de confiance étaient larges, laissant part à une certaine incertitude. Toutefois, un essai multicentrique, réalisé à grande échelle, d'un traitement individualisé n'a révélé aucune différence entre les mesures de résultats urinaires ou de qualité de vie et affichait des intervalles de confiance plus réduits. De même, aucune preuve n'a permis de démontrer des effets bénéfiques dans le cas d'un dysfonctionnement érectile (56 % des hommes souffrant d'un trouble de l'érection dans le groupe de formation aux exercices de renforcement des muscles du plancher pelvien contre 55 % dans le groupe témoin au bout d'un an (RR 1,01, IC à 95 % 0,84 à 1,20)). Des essais individuels réalisés à petite échelle ont fourni des données suggérant que la stimulation électrique, l'innervation magnétique externe ou les combinaisons de plusieurs traitements pouvaient se révéler bénéfiques, mais les preuves étaient limitées.

Un essai réalisé à grande échelle a démontré qu'une intervention individualisée basée sur la formation aux exercices de renforcement des muscles du plancher pelvien pour le traitement de l'incontinence ou d'un dysfonctionnement érectile ne présentait aucun effet bénéfique chez les hommes souffrant d'incontinence suite à une résection transurétrale de la prostate (RTUP) (par ex. 65 % des hommes souffrant d'incontinence urinaire contre 62 % dans le groupe témoin, RR au bout de 12 mois de 1,05, IC à 95 % 0,91 à 1,23).

Dans huit essais portant sur un traitement conservateur de l'incontinence masculine suite à une prostatectomie radicale à des fins curatives et de prévention, la formation aux exercices de renforcement des muscles du plancher pelvien présentait des effets bénéfiques dans l'ensemble en termes de réduction de l'IU (par ex. 10 % des hommes souffrant d'incontinence urinaire au bout d'un an contre 32 % dans les groupes témoin, RR d'incontinence urinaire de 0,32, IC à 95 % 0,20 à 0,51) au détriment de la gestion du contrôle. Toutefois, cette découverte n'était pas corroborée par les autres données issues de tests d'incontinence. Toute découverte doit être considérée avec précaution, étant donné la qualité médiocre à modérée de la majorité des essais et la largesse des intervalles de confiance.

Un essai révélait que les hommes étaient plus satisfaits d'un type particulier de dispositif de compression externe, dont la perte urinaire était la plus faible, par rapport aux deux autres essais ou à l'absence de traitement. Les effets des autres interventions conservatrices, comme des changements appliqués au style de vie, restent indéterminés car aucun essai mentionnant ces interventions n'a été identifié.

Conclusions des auteurs

La valeur accordée aux différentes approches pour la gestion conservatrice de l'incontinence post-prostatectomie suite à une prostatectomie radicale reste indéterminée. Les effets bénéfiques semblent incertains chez les hommes ayant bénéficié d'une formation individualisée aux exercices de renforcement des muscles du plancher pelvien après une résection transurétrale de la prostate (RTUP). Il est possible de gérer l'incontinence à long terme à l'aide de pinces péniennes externes, mais leur innocuité est problématique.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Prise en charge conservatrice de l'incontinence urinaire post-prostatectomie

Prise en charge pour les hommes souffrant d'incontinence urinaire suite à une chirurgie de la prostate

La prostate est une glande sexuelle masculine qui entoure la base de la vessie. Deux maladies principales de la prostate (cancer de la prostate et élargissement bénin de la prostate (non cancéreux) peuvent être traitées par une intervention chirurgicale, mais certains hommes souffrent de fuites urinaires (incontinence urinaire) par la suite. Un traitement conservateur de ces fuites, comme le suivi d'une formation aux exercices de renforcement des muscles du plancher pelvien avec ou sans rétroaction biologique ou une stimulation électrique anale, pourrait aider les hommes à contrôler ces fuites. La revue des essais a révélé l'existence de preuves contradictoires concernant les effets bénéfiques de la formation dispensée aux hommes par des thérapeutes et qui consiste à contracter les muscles du plancher pelvien pour la prévention ou le traitement des fuites urinaires suite à une chirurgie radicale de la prostate pour le traitement d'un cancer. Toutefois, des informations issues d'un essai réalisé à grande échelle ne révélaient aucun effet bénéfique chez les hommes consultant un thérapeute pour recevoir une formation aux exercices de renforcement des muscles du plancher pelvien suite à une résection transurétrale (RTUP) dans le cas d'un élargissement bénin de la prostate. Sur trois dispositifs de compression externe testés, la pince pénienne semblait être la plus adaptée, mais elle doit être utilisée avec précaution en raison de risques liés à son innocuité. D'autres recherches de meilleure qualité sont nécessaires afin d'évaluer la gestion conservatrice.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 10th April, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français