Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Personalised risk communication for informed decision making about taking screening tests

  1. Adrian GK Edwards1,*,
  2. Gurudutt Naik1,
  3. Harry Ahmed1,
  4. Glyn J Elwyn1,
  5. Timothy Pickles2,
  6. Kerry Hood2,
  7. Rebecca Playle2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Consumers and Communication Group

Published Online: 28 FEB 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 24 MAR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001865.pub3


How to Cite

Edwards AGK, Naik G, Ahmed H, Elwyn GJ, Pickles T, Hood K, Playle R. Personalised risk communication for informed decision making about taking screening tests. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD001865. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001865.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Cardiff University, Cochrane Institute of Primary Care and Public Health, School of Medicine, Cardiff, Wales, UK

  2. 2

    Cardiff University, South East Wales Trials Unit, Institute of Translation, Innovation, Methodology and Engagement, Cardiff, Wales, UK

*Adrian GK Edwards, Cochrane Institute of Primary Care and Public Health, School of Medicine, Cardiff University, 2nd Floor, Neuadd Meirionnydd, Heath Park, Cardiff, Wales, CF14 4YS, UK. edwardsag@cardiff.ac.uk. adriangkedwards@btinternet.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (conclusions changed)
  2. Published Online: 28 FEB 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

There is a trend towards greater patient involvement in healthcare decisions. Although screening is usually perceived as good for the health of the population, there are risks associated with the tests involved. Achieving both adequate involvement of consumers and informed decision making are now seen as important goals for screening programmes. Personalised risk estimates have been shown to be effective methods of risk communication.

Objectives

To assess the effects of personalised risk communication on informed decision making by individuals taking screening tests. We also assess individual components that constitute informed decisions.

Search methods

Two authors searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 3, 2012), MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), CINAHL (EbscoHOST) and PsycINFO (OvidSP) without language restrictions. We searched from 2006 to March 2012. The date ranges for the previous searches were from 1989 to December 2005 for PsycINFO and from 1985 to December 2005 for other databases. For the original version of this review, we also searched CancerLit  and Science Citation Index (March 2001). We also reviewed the reference lists and conducted citation searches of included studies and other systematic reviews in the field, to identify any studies missed during the initial search.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials incorporating an intervention with a 'personalised risk communication element’ for individuals undergoing screening procedures, and reporting measures of informed decisions and also cognitive, affective, or behavioural outcomes addressing the decision by such individuals, of whether or not to undergo screening.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently assessed each included trial for risk of bias, and extracted data. We extracted data about the nature and setting of interventions, and relevant outcome data. We used standard statistical methods to combine data using RevMan version 5, including analysis according to different levels of detail of personalised risk communication, different conditions for screening, and studies based only on high-risk participants rather than people at 'average’ risk. 

Main results

We included 41 studies involving 28,700 people. Nineteen new studies were identified in this update, adding to the 22 studies included in the previous two iterations of the review. Three studies measured informed decision with regard to the uptake of screening following personalised risk communication as a part of their intervention. All of these three studies were at low risk of bias and there was strong evidence that the interventions enhanced informed decision making, although with heterogeneous results. Overall 45.2% (592/1309) of participants who received personalised risk information made informed choices, compared to 20.2% (229/1135) of participants who received generic risk information. The overall odds ratios (ORs) for informed decision were 4.48 (95% confidence interval (CI) 3.62 to 5.53 for fixed effect) and 3.65 (95% CI 2.13 to 6.23 for random effects). Nine studies measured increase in knowledge, using different scales. All of these studies showed an increase in knowledge with personalised risk communication. In three studies the interventions showed a trend towards more accurate risk perception, but the evidence was of poor quality. Four out of six studies reported non-significant changes in anxiety following personalised risk communication to the participants. Overall there was a small non-significant decrease in the anxiety scores. Most studies (32/41) measured the uptake of screening tests following interventions. Our results (OR 1.15 (95% CI 1.02 to 1.29)) constitute low quality evidence, consistent with a small effect, that personalised risk communication in which a risk score was provided (6 studies) or the participants were given their categorised risk (6 studies), increases uptake of screening tests. 

Authors' conclusions

There is strong evidence from three trials that personalised risk estimates incorporated within communication interventions for screening programmes enhance informed choices. However the evidence for increasing the uptake of such screening tests with similar interventions is weak, and it is not clear if this increase is associated with informed choices. Studies included a diverse range of screening programmes. Therefore, data from this review do not allow us to draw conclusions about the best interventions to deliver personalised risk communication for enhancing informed decisions. The results are dominated by findings from the topic area of mammography and colorectal cancer. Caution is therefore required in generalising from these results, and particularly for clinical topics other than mammography and colorectal cancer screening.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Personalised risk communication for informed decision making about taking screening tests

Screening is generally seen as an effective and safe method to prevent diseases, but there are risks and disadvantages with the procedures involved. It is important for the person undergoing screening to know about the risks of the disease and also how this is relevant to him or her. Such information would help people to make an informed choice about taking up a screening procedure.

In this review we looked at studies that provided personalised risk information for each participant, so that he or she could make a decision about whether to undergo screening, based on their personal risk profile. We found 41 studies with 28,700 participants that provided such personalised risk information to the participants. We integrated the results of all these studies and found that when such a risk profile was included in the intervention, the participants made more informed decisions about screening, compared to people who were provided with more general risk information. Overall 45.2% (592/1309) of participants who received personalised risk information made informed choices as compared to 20.2% (229/1135) of participants who received generic risk information.

We also found that these interventions seemed to increase knowledge and may increase accuracy of risk perception in the trial participants. However they did not significantly affect participants' anxiety. The results also indicated that providing people with personalised risks of the disease resulted in a small increase in the number of people who undertook the screening procedure. The results from this review are dominated by studies screening for breast cancer and colorectal cancer. Caution is required in applying these results to other types of screening.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Communication des risques personnalisée pour une prise de décision éclairée concernant les tests de dépistage

Contexte

On observe une tendance à l'implication croissante des patients dans les décisions de santé. Bien que le dépistage soit généralement perçu comme utile pour la santé de la population, des risques sont associés aux tests concernés. Le fait de parvenir à la fois à une bonne implication des consommateurs et à une prise de décision éclairée est désormais considéré comme un objectif important pour les programmes de dépistage. Les estimations personnalisées des risques se sont révélées des méthodes efficaces de communication des risques.

Objectifs

Evaluer les effet de la communication des risques personnalisée sur la prise de décision éclairée par les personnes passant des tests de dépistage. Nous avons également évalué les composantes individuelles qui constituent des décisions éclairées.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Deux auteurs ont effectué des recherches dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, numéro 3, 2012), MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), CINAHL (EbscoHOST) et PsycINFO (OvidSP) sans restrictions de langue. Nous avons effectué des recherches de 2006 à mars 2012. La période pour les recherches précédentes s'étendait de 1989 à décembre 2005 pour PsycINFO et de 1985 à décembre 2005 pour les autres bases de données. Pour la version originale de cette revue, nous avons également effectué des recherches dans CancerLit et Science Citation Index (mars 2001). Nous avons par ailleurs examiné les bibliographies et avons procédé à des recherches de références dans les études incluses et d'autres revues systématiques du domaine pour identifier les études manquées lors de la recherche initiale.

Critères de sélection

Les essais contrôlés randomisés intégrant une intervention ayant un « élément de communication des risques personnalisée » pour les personnes subissant des procédures de dépistage et rendant compte de mesures des décisions éclairées, mais aussi de critères de jugement cognitifs, affectifs ou comportementaux concernant la décision de ces personnes de passer ou non un test de dépistage.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont, de manière indépendante, évalué le risque de biais de chaque essai inclus et extrait les données. Nous avons extrait des données concernant la nature et le contexte des interventions et les données relatives aux critères de jugement pertinents. Nous avons utilisé des méthodes statistiques standard pour combiner les données à l'aide du logiciel RevMan version 5, notamment une analyse selon différents niveaux de détail de la communication des risques personnalisée, différentes conditions de dépistage et des études basées uniquement sur les participants à haut risque plutôt que sur les personnes présentant un risque « moyen ». 

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus 41 études portant sur 28 700 personnes. Dix-neuf nouvelles études ont été identifiées dans cette mise à jour, lesquelles s'ajoutent aux 22 études incluses dans les deux précédentes versions de la revue. Trois études mesuraient la décision éclairée concernant le passage d'un test de dépistage après une communication des risques personnalisée dans le cadre de leur intervention. Ces trois études présentaient un faible risque de biais et ont fourni des preuves solides indiquant que les interventions amélioraient la prise de décisions éclairées, bien que les résultats aient été hétérogènes. Globalement, 45,2 % (592/1309) des participants qui recevaient des informations personnalisées sur les risques ont fait des choix éclairés contre 20,2 % (229/1135) des participants qui recevaient des informations générales concernant les risques. Les rapports de cotes (RC) combinés concernant la décision éclairée ont été de 4,48 (intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % 3,62 à 5,53 pour les effets fixes) et de 3,65 (IC à 95 % 2,13 à 6,23 pour les effets aléatoires). Neuf études ont mesuré l'accroissement des connaissances au moyen d'échelles différentes. Toutes ces études ont montré un accroissement des connaissances avec une communication des risques personnalisée. Dans trois études, les interventions ont montré une tendance à une plus grande exactitude de la perception des risques, mais les preuves étaient de qualité médiocre. Quatre études sur six ont rapporté des changements non significatifs de l'anxiété après une communication personnalisée des risques aux participants. Globalement, on a observé une faible diminution, non significative, des scores d'anxiété. La plupart des études (32/41) ont mesuré le passage de tests de dépistage après les interventions. Nos résultats (RC 1,15 (IC à 95 % 1,02 à 1,29)) constituent des preuves de qualité médiocre, cohérentes avec un léger effet, indiquant qu'une communication des risques personnalisée, dans laquelle un score de risque était fourni (6 études) ou les participants étaient informés de leur niveau de risque (6 études), augmente le passage de tests de dépistage. 

Conclusions des auteurs

Des preuves solides, issues de trois essais, indiquent que les estimations des risques personnalisées incluses dans les interventions de communication pour les programmes de dépistage améliorent les choix éclairés. Cependant, les preuves de l'augmentation des recours à ces tests de dépistage avec des interventions semblables sont faibles et on ignore si cette augmentation est associée à des choix éclairés. Les études ont inclus des programmes de dépistage divers. Par conséquent, les données de cette revue ne nous permettent pas d'établir des conclusions quant aux meilleures interventions pour apporter une communication des risques personnalisée afin d'améliorer les décisions éclairées. Les résultats sont dominés par des découvertes issues du domaine de la mammographie et du cancer colorectal. Il faut donc être prudent en établissant des généralités à partir de ces résultats, et en particulier pour les domaines cliniques autres que la mammographie et le dépistage du cancer colorectal.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Communication des risques personnalisée pour une prise de décision éclairée concernant les tests de dépistage

Communication des risques personnalisée pour une prise de décision éclairée concernant les tests de dépistage

Le dépistage est généralement considéré comme une méthode efficace et sûre pour prévenir les maladies, mais il existe des risques et des inconvénients liés aux procédures utilisées. Il est important que la personne passant un test de dépistage connaisse les risques de la maladie, mais également les raisons pour lesquelles elle est concernée. Ces informations permettraient aux personnes de prendre une décision éclairée quant au fait de suivre une procédure de dépistage.

Dans cette revue, nous avons examiné des études qui fournissaient des informations personnalisées sur les risques pour chaque participant(e), de façon qu'il (elle) puisse décider ou non de passer un test de dépistage en fonction de son profil de risque personnel. Nous avons trouvé 41 études qui portaient sur un total de 28 700 participants et leur fournissaient de telles informations personnalisées sur les risques. Nous avons intégré les résultats de toutes ces études et avons découvert que lorsqu'un tel profil de risque était inclus dans l'intervention, les participants prenaient des décisions plus éclairées quant au dépistage comparé aux personnes recevant des informations plus générales concernant les risques. Globalement, 45,2 % (592/1309) des participants qui recevaient des informations personnalisées sur les risques ont fait des choix éclairés contre 20,2 % (229/1135) des participants qui recevaient des informations générales concernant les risques.

Nous avons également découvert que ces interventions semblaient accroître les connaissances et pouvaient améliorer l'exactitude de la perception des risques chez les participants aux essais. Cependant, elles n'ont pas affecté de façon significative l'anxiété des participants. Les résultats ont également indiqué que le fait de fournir des informations personnalisées sur les risques de la maladie avait entraîné une légère augmentation du nombre de personnes ayant suivi la procédure de dépistage. Les résultats de cette revue sont dominés par des études dépistant le cancer du sein et le cancer colorectal. Il est nécessaire d'être prudent dans l'application de ces résultats à d'autres types de dépistage.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st March, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Ministère de la Santé. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en santé du Canada, ministère de la Santé du Québec, Fonds de recherche de Québec-Santé et Institut national d'excellence en santé et en services sociaux.