Intervention Review

Interventions for preventing obesity in children

  1. Elizabeth Waters1,*,
  2. Andrea de Silva-Sanigorski2,
  3. Belinda J Burford3,
  4. Tamara Brown4,
  5. Karen J Campbell5,
  6. Yang Gao6,
  7. Rebecca Armstrong2,
  8. Lauren Prosser7,
  9. Carolyn D Summerbell8

Editorial Group: Cochrane Public Health Group

Published Online: 7 DEC 2011

Assessed as up-to-date: 22 SEP 2010

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001871.pub3

How to Cite

Waters E, de Silva-Sanigorski A, Burford BJ, Brown T, Campbell KJ, Gao Y, Armstrong R, Prosser L, Summerbell CD. Interventions for preventing obesity in children. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 12. Art. No.: CD001871. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001871.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    The University of Melbourne, Jack Brockhoff Child Health and Wellbeing Program, The McCaughey Centre, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, Carlton, VIC, Australia

  2. 2

    The University of Melbourne, Jack Brockhoff Child Health and Wellbeing Program, The McCaughey Centre, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, Parkville, Victoria, Australia

  3. 3

    The University of Melbourne, The Jack Brockhoff Child Health and Wellbeing Program, The McCaughey Centre, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, Parkville, VIC, Australia

  4. 4

    Division of Clinical Effectiveness, School of Population, Community and Behavioural Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool Reviews and Implementation Group, Liverpool, UK

  5. 5

    School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Centre for Physical Activity and Nutrition Research, Burwood, VIC, Australia

  6. 6

    The Chinese University of Hong Kong, School of Public Health and Primary Care, Hong Kong, Hong Kong

  7. 7

    Dental Health Services Victoria, Carlton, Victoria, Australia

  8. 8

    Queen's Campus, Durham University, School of Medicine and Health, Wolfson Research Institute, Stockton-on-Tees, UK

*Elizabeth Waters, Jack Brockhoff Child Health and Wellbeing Program, The McCaughey Centre, Melbourne School of Population and Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Level 5/207 Bouverie St, Carlton, VIC, 3010, Australia. ewaters@unimelb.edu.au.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 7 DEC 2011

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Abstract
  7. Plain language summary

Background

Prevention of childhood obesity is an international public health priority given the significant impact of obesity on acute and chronic diseases, general health, development and well-being. The international evidence base for strategies that governments, communities and families can implement to prevent obesity, and promote health, has been accumulating but remains unclear.

Objectives

This review primarily aims to update the previous Cochrane review of childhood obesity prevention research and determine the effectiveness of evaluated interventions intended to prevent obesity in children, assessed by change in Body Mass Index (BMI). Secondary aims were to examine the characteristics of the programs and strategies to answer the questions "What works for whom, why and for what cost?"

Search methods

The searches were re-run in CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO and CINAHL in March 2010 and searched relevant websites. Non-English language papers were included and experts were contacted.

Selection criteria

The review includes data from childhood obesity prevention studies that used a controlled study design (with or without randomisation). Studies were included if they evaluated interventions, policies or programs in place for twelve weeks or more. If studies were randomised at a cluster level, 6 clusters were required.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of included studies.  Data was extracted on intervention implementation, cost, equity and outcomes. Outcome measures were grouped according to whether they measured adiposity, physical activity (PA)-related behaviours or diet-related behaviours.  Adverse outcomes were recorded. A meta-analysis was conducted using available BMI or standardised BMI (zBMI) score data with subgroup analysis by age group (0-5, 6-12, 13-18 years, corresponding to stages of developmental and childhood settings).

Main results

This review includes 55 studies (an additional 36 studies found for this update). The majority of studies targeted children aged 6-12 years.  The meta-analysis included 37 studies of 27,946 children and demonstrated that programmes were effective at reducing adiposity, although not all individual interventions were effective, and there was a high level of observed heterogeneity (I2=82%). Overall, children in the intervention group had a standardised mean difference in adiposity (measured as BMI or zBMI) of -0.15kg/m2 (95% confidence interval (CI): -0.21 to -0.09). Intervention effects by age subgroups were -0.26kg/m2 (95% CI:-0.53 to 0.00) (0-5 years), -0.15kg/m2 (95% CI -0.23 to -0.08) (6-12 years), and -0.09kg/m2 (95% CI -0.20 to 0.03) (13-18 years). Heterogeneity was apparent in all three age groups and could not explained by randomisation status or the type, duration or setting of the intervention.  Only eight studies reported on adverse effects and no evidence of adverse outcomes such as unhealthy dieting practices, increased prevalence of underweight or body image sensitivities was found.  Interventions did not appear to increase health inequalities although this was examined in fewer studies.

Authors' conclusions

We found strong evidence to support beneficial effects of child obesity prevention programmes on BMI, particularly for programmes targeted to children aged six to 12 years. However, given the unexplained heterogeneity and the likelihood of small study bias, these findings must be interpreted cautiously. A broad range of programme components were used in these studies and whilst it is not possible to distinguish which of these components contributed most to the beneficial effects observed, our synthesis indicates the following to be promising policies and strategies:

·         school curriculum that includes healthy eating, physical activity and body image

·         increased sessions for physical activity and the development of fundamental movement skills throughout the school week

·         improvements in nutritional quality of the food supply in schools

·         environments and cultural practices that support children eating healthier foods and being active throughout each day

·         support for teachers and other staff to implement health promotion strategies and activities (e.g. professional development, capacity building activities)

·         parent support and home activities that encourage children to be more active, eat more nutritious foods and spend less time in screen based activities

However, study and evaluation designs need to be strengthened, and reporting extended to capture process and implementation factors, outcomes in relation to measures of equity, longer term outcomes, potential harms and costs.

Childhood obesity prevention research must now move towards identifying how effective intervention components can be embedded within health, education and care systems and achieve long term sustainable impacts.  

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Abstract
  7. Plain language summary

Interventions for preventing obesity in children

Childhood obesity can cause social, psychological and health problems, and is linked to obesity later in life and poor health outcomes as an adult.  Obesity development is related to physical activity and nutrition. To prevent obesity, 55 studies conducted internationally have looked at programmes aiming to improve either or both of these behaviours.  Although many studies were able to improve children’s nutrition or physical activity to some extent, only some studies were able to see an effect of the programme on children’s levels of fatness.  When we combined the studies, we were able to see that these programmes made a positive difference, but there was much variation between the study findings which we could not explain. Also, it appeared that the findings may be biased by missing small studies with negative findings. We also tried to work out why some programmes work better than others, and whether there was potential harm associated with children being involved in the programmes.  Although only a few studies looked at whether programmes were harmful, the results suggest that those obesity prevention strategies do not increase body image concerns, unhealthy dieting practices, level of underweight, or unhealthy attitudes to weight, and that all children can benefit.  It is important that more studies in very young children and adolescents are conducted to find out more about obesity prevention in these age groups, and also that we assess how long the intervention effects last.  Also, we need to develop ways of ensuring that research findings benefit all children by embedding the successful programme activities into everyday practices in homes, schools, child care settings, the health system and the wider community.     

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Abstract
  7. Plain language summary

Interventions for preventing obesity in children

Contexte

La prévention de l’obésité infantile est une priorité de santé publique internationale en raison des effets indéniables de l’obésité sur les maladies chroniques et aiguës, la santé générale, le développement et le bien-être. La base de connaissances internationales regroupant les stratégies, que les gouvernements, communautés et familles peuvent mettre en œuvre pour prévenir l’obésité et promouvoir la santé, s’est enrichie, mais reste imprécise.

Objectifs

Cette revue a pour objectif principal de mettre à jour la revue Cochrane précédente concernant la recherche sur la prévention de l’obésité infantile et de déterminer l’efficacité des interventions évaluées afin de prévenir l’obésité infantile, évaluée par un changement de l’Indice de Masse Corporelle (IMC). Les objectifs secondaires consistent à examiner les caractéristiques des programmes et les stratégies afin de répondre aux questions « Quel traitement est efficace pour qui, pour quelle(s) raisons(s) et à quel prix ? ».

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Les recherches ont été répétées dans CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO et CINAHL en mars 2010 et concernaient des sites Web pertinents. Des documents rédigés dans des langues non anglophones ont été inclus et des experts ont été contactés.

Critères de sélection

La revue contient des données issues d’études portant sur la prévention de l’obésité infantile ayant utilisé un plan d’étude contrôlée (avec ou sans randomisation). Des études ont été incluses si elles évaluaient des interventions, des politiques ou des programmes mis en place pendant douze semaines ou plus. Si les études étaient randomisées en cluster, 6 clusters étaient requis

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont extrait des données et évalué les risques de biais des études incluses, de façon indépendante. Les données ont été extraites lors de l’implémentation, des coûts, de l’équité et des résultats de l’intervention. Les mesures des résultats ont été regroupées selon qu’elles mesuraient l’adiposité, les comportements liés à l’activité physique (AP) ou au régime alimentaire. Les résultats indésirables ont été enregistrés. Une méta-analyse a été effectuée à l’aide de l’IMC disponible ou des données du score de l’IMC normalisé (IMCn) grâce à une analyse de sous-groupe réalisée par groupe d’âge (0 - 5, 6 - 12, 13 - 18 ans, correspondant aux étapes de développement et de l’enfance).

Résultats Principaux

Cette revue contient 55 études (36 études supplémentaires ont été trouvées pour cette mise à jour). La majorité de ces études ciblaient des enfants âgés de 6 à 12 ans. La méta-analyse a inclus 37 études totalisant 27 946 enfants et a révélé que les programmes étaient efficaces en termes de réduction de l’adiposité, bien que seules quelques interventions individuelles étaient efficaces et que le niveau d’hétérogénéité observé était élevé (I2=82%). %). Dans l’ensemble, les enfants appartenant au groupe d’intervention présentaient une différence moyenne normalisée d’adiposité (mesurée en IMC ou IMCn) de - 0,15 kg/m2 (intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % : - 0,21 à - 0,09). Les effets de l’intervention par sous-groupes d’âge étaient de - 0,26 kg/m2 (IC à 95 % :- 0,53 à 0,00) (0 - 5 ans), - 0,15 kg/m2 (IC à 95 % : - 0,23 à - 0,08) (6 - 12 ans) et - 0,09 kg/m2 (IC à 95 % : - 0,20 à 0,03) (13 - 18 ans). L’hétérogénéité était visible dans l’ensemble des trois groupes d’âge et ne pouvait pas être expliquée par le type de randomisation ou le statut, la durée ou la configuration de l’intervention. Seules huit études ont révélé des effets indésirables et aucune preuve de résultats indésirables, comme l’identification de régimes alimentaires malsains, une prévalence accrue de l’insuffisance pondérale ou des sensibilités relatives à l’image corporelle. Les interventions ne semblaient pas aggraver les inégalités en termes de santé, bien que ce problème ait été examiné dans moins d’études.

Conclusions des auteurs

Nous avons trouvé des preuves solides pour corroborer les effets bénéfiques des programmes de prévention de l’obésité infantile sur l’IMC, plus particulièrement les programmes ciblant les enfants âgés de 6 à 12 ans. Toutefois, étant donné l’hétérogénéité inexpliquée et la probabilité d’un biais infime dans l’étude, ces découvertes doivent être interprétées avec précaution. Un large éventail de composants de programme a été utilisé dans ces études et bien qu’il soit impossible de distinguer le composant ayant le plus contribué aux effets bénéfiques observés, notre synthèse indique que les éléments suivants constitueront des politiques et des stratégies prometteuses :

·         programme scolaire incluant une alimentation saine, une activité physique et une image corporelle

·         augmentation du nombre de cours d’éducation physique et développement de gestes fondamentaux à effectuer tout au long de la semaine scolaire

·         améliorations de la qualité nutritionnelle de l’alimentation scolaire

·         environnements et pratiques culturelles qui amènent les enfants à consommer des aliments plus sains et à rester actif toute la journée

·         aide aux enseignants et autres employés scolaires à mettre en place des stratégies et des activités (par ex. : développement professionnel, activités de renforcement des capacités) visant à promouvoir la santé

·         soutien parental et activités domestiques encourageant les enfants à être plus actifs, à manger des aliments plus nutritifs et à passer moins de temps devant des écrans

Toutefois, la conception de l’étude et ses évaluations doivent être améliorées et sa notification étendue afin de capturer les facteurs de processus et d’implémentation, les résultats en termes de mesures d’équité, les résultats à plus long terme, les dangers et coûts éventuels..

La recherche portant sur la prévention de l’obésité infantile doit désormais privilégier la manière dont les composants d’intervention efficaces peuvent être intégrés à la santé, l’éducation et les systèmes de soins et obtenir ainsi des effets durables à long terme. .  

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Abstract
  7. Plain language summary

Interventions for preventing obesity in children

Interventions pour la prévention de l’obésité infantile

L’obésité infantile peut causer des problèmes sociaux, psychologiques et de santé. Elle est également liée à l’obésité à un âge plus avancé et à une mauvaise santé à l’âge adulte. Le développement de l’obésité est lié à l’activité physique et la nutrition. Pour prévenir l’obésité, 55 études réalisées à l’échelle internationale se sont penchées sur des programmes visant à améliorer l’un de ces comportements ou les deux. Bien que de nombreuses études aient permis d’améliorer la nutrition infantile ou l’activité physique à un certain niveau, seules quelques études ont pu confirmer les effets de ces programmes sur les niveaux d’adiposité des enfants. Lorsque nous avons combiné ces études, nous avons pu constater que ces programmes créaient une différence positive, mais les découvertes des études présentaient de nombreuses variations inexplicables. Les découvertes semblaient également biaisées en omettant des études réalisées à petite échelle et révélant des découvertes négatives. Nous avons aussi essayé de comprendre pourquoi certains programmes sont plus efficaces que d’autres et d’identifier la présence d’un éventuel danger encouru par les enfants suivant ces programmes. Bien que seules quelques études se soient intéressées à la dangerosité de ces programmes, les résultats ont suggéré que ces stratégies de prévention de l’obésité n’aggravaient pas les inquiétudes en termes d’image corporelle, de régimes alimentaires malsains, de niveaux d’insuffisance pondérale ou de comportements malsains et que tous les enfants pouvaient en bénéficier. Des études supplémentaires doivent être réalisées auprès des jeunes enfants et des adolescents, afin d’en savoir plus sur la prévention de l’obésité dans ces groupes d’âge, mais aussi afin que nous puissions évaluer la durée d’efficacité de ces interventions. Nous devons également développer des méthodes permettant de nous assurer que les découvertes de ces recherches profitent à tous les enfants en intégrant la réussite des activités proposées par ces programmes à des exercices quotidiens effectués à domicile, dans les écoles, dès la petite enfance, dans le système de santé et l’ensemble de la collectivité.  

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 29th August, 2013
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Abstract
  7. Plain language summary

Intervenções para a prevenção da obesidade infantil

Background

A prevenção da obesidade infantil é uma prioridade internacional de saúde pública devido ao seu impacto significante sobre doenças agudas e crônicas, sobre a saúde geral, sobre o desenvolvimento e o bem-estar. Tem havido um aumento na base de evidências internacionais sobre estratégias que podem ser usadas por governos, comunidades e famílias para prevenir a obesidade e promover a saúde infantil. Porém ainda existem incertezas nessa área.

Objectives

Esta revisão atualizou a revisão Cochrane anterior sobre prevenção da obesidade infantil e avaliou a efetividade de intervenções para prevenir a obesidade infantil medida através de mudanças no Índice de Massa Corporal (IMC). Como objetivos secundários, foram avaliadas as características dos programas e das estratégias para responder as perguntas “O que funciona para quem, porque e com qual custo?”

Search methods

As buscas foram refeitas nas bases CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsychINFO e CINAHL em Março de 2010 e também buscamos websites relevantes. Incluímos artigos escritos em outros idiomas além do inglês e entramos em contatos com especialistas da área.

Selection criteria

Esta revisão incluiu estudos de prevenção da obesidade infantil que utilizaram um desenho controlado (com ou sem randomização). Os estudos foram incluídos quando avaliaram as intervenções, políticas ou programas por pelo menos 12 semanas. Se os estudos fossem randomizados por aglomerados (clusters), pelo menos 6 clusters eram necessários.

Data collection and analysis

Dois revisores extraíram os dados e analisaram de forma independente o risco de viés dos estudos incluídos. Foram extraídos dados sobre a implementação da intervenção, seus custos, equidade e desfechos. Os desfechos foram agrupados quanto à mensuração de medidas de adiposidade, atividade física (PA) ou dieta. Os desfechos adversos também foram coletados. Foi feita uma metanálise utilizando o IMC disponível ou valores do IMC padronizado (zIMC), com análise de subgrupos por faixa etária entre 0-5, 6-12, 13-18 anos de idade, correspondendo aos estágios do desenvolvimento infantil.

Main results

Esta revisão incluiu um total de 55 estudos (sendo que 36 desses estudos vieram desta atualização). A maioria dos estudos incluiu crianças entre 6 a 12 anos. A metanálise incluiu 37 estudos com 27.946 crianças e demonstrou que os programas eram efetivos para reduzir a adiposidade. Porém, nem todas as intervenções foram efetivas e a heterogeneidade foi alta (I2 = 82%). Em geral, as crianças do grupo intervenção tiveram uma diferença média padronizada da adiposidade (medida como IMC ou zIMC) de -0.15kg/m2 (intervalo de confiança de 95% (IC): -0.21 a -0.09). Os efeitos da intervenção por subgrupos de idade foram: -0.26kg/m2 (IC 95%: -0.53 a 0.00) para crianças de 0-5 anos, -0.15kg/m2 (IC 95% -0.23 a -0.08) para crianças de 6-12 anos e -0.09kg/m2 (IC 95% -0.20 a 0.03) para crianças de 13-18 anos. A heterogeneidade foi evidente nas três faixas etárias e não foi justificada pela presença ou ausência de randomização ou pelo tipo, duração ou local da intervenção. Apenas 8 estudos relataram efeitos adversos. As intervenções não produziram desfechos adversos como práticas alimentares não saudáveis ou aumento na prevalência de crianças desnutridas ou com problemas de imagem corporal. As intervenções não parecem ter aumentado desigualdades de saúde; porém este desfecho foi avaliado em poucos estudos.

Authors' conclusions

Encontramos fortes evidências indicando efeitos benéficos dos programas de prevenção de obesidade infantil sobre o IMC, especialmente nos programas dirigidos a crianças de 6-12 anos de idade. Entretanto estes achados devem ser interpretados com cautela devido à heterogeneidade inexplicável e a probabilidade de existir um viés decorrente de estudos com pequena casuística. Os estudos incluídos nesta revisão tinham programas com uma grande variedade de componentes. Apesar de não conseguirmos identificar quais dos componentes abaixo mais contribuíram para os efeitos benéficos observados, nossa síntese indica que as seguintes políticas e estratégias parecem ser promissoras:

·         um currículo escolar que inclua alimentação saudável, atividade física e imagem corporal

·         mais sessões de atividade física e de desenvolvimento de habilidades motoras fundamentais ao longo da semana escolar

·         melhora na qualidade nutricional dos alimentos fornecidos nas escolas

·         ambientes e práticas culturais que incentivem as crianças a comerem alimentos mais saudáveis e a serem fisicamente ativas ao longo de cada dia

·         apoio para os professores e outros funcionários para a implementação de estratégias e atividades de promoção de saúde (por ex. atividades de desenvolvimento e capacitação profissional)

·         apoio dos pais e atividades em casa que encorajem a criança a ser fisicamente ativa, a comer alimentos mais nutritivos e a gastar menos tempo com atividades em frente das telas da televisão, do computador e de jogos eletrônicos.

Porém, ainda é necessário melhorar o desenho dos estudos e das análises. Os estudos também precisam avaliar fatores relacionados a processos e a implementação, incluir desfechos relacionados com medidas de equidade e desfechos à longo prazo, assim como possíveis efeitos adversos e custos das intervenções.

As pesquisas sobre a prevenção da obesidade infantil precisam progredir no sentido de identificar como os componentes efetivos da intervenção podem ser incorporados dentro dos sistemas de saúde, de educação e de cuidados e como podem alcançar impactos sustentáveis a longo prazo.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Abstract
  7. Plain language summary

Intervenções para a prevenção da obesidade infantil

Intervenções para a prevenção da obesidade infantil

A obesidade infantil pode causar problemas sociais, psicológicos de saúde além de estar associada com obesidade e problemas de saúde na vida adulta. O surgimento da obesidade está relacionado com a atividade física e nutrição. Para prevenir a obesidade, 55 estudos internacionais avaliaram programas que tentaram modificar a alimentação ou a atividade física. Apesar de muitos estudos terem melhorado a alimentação ou a atividade física das crianças até certo ponto, apenas alguns estudos conseguiram mostrar algum efeito destes programas sobre os níveis de adiposidade dessas crianças. Quando os resultados dos estudos foram combinados, pudemos ver que estes programas fizeram uma diferença positiva, mas também observamos a existência de uma grande variação entre os achados dos estudos e não foi possível esclarecer a causa para essa variação. Os resultados também podem terem sido enviesados pela falta de pequenos estudos com resultados negativos. Tentamos descobrir porque alguns programas funcionam melhor do que outros, e se haveria algum perigo para as crianças que participaram dos programas. Apesar de poucos estudos terem avaliado os possíveis riscos dos programas, os resultados sugerem que as estratégias para prevenção da obesidade infantil não aumentam problemas de imagem corporal, não aumentam a probabilidade de comportamentos alimentares não saudáveis, nem aumentam a taxa de crianças desnutridas ou de atitudes não saudáveis relacionadas ao próprio peso. É importante realizar mais estudos em crianças bem jovens e em adolescentes para se descobrir mais sobre a prevenção da obesidade nestes grupos etários. Também é importante verificar por quanto tempo os efeitos destas intervenções duram. Precisamos desenvolver meios para garantir que os resultados das pesquisas venham a beneficiar todas as crianças através da incorporação das atividades efetivas nas práticas diárias nos lares, nas escolas, nas creches, no sistema de saúde e em toda a comunidade.

Translation notes

Translated by: Brazilian Cochrane Centre
Translation Sponsored by: None