Intervention Review

Physical rehabilitation approaches for the recovery of function and mobility following stroke

  1. Alex Pollock1,*,
  2. Gillian Baer2,
  3. Pauline Campbell1,
  4. Pei Ling Choo3,
  5. Anne Forster4,
  6. Jacqui Morris5,
  7. Valerie M Pomeroy6,
  8. Peter Langhorne7

Editorial Group: Cochrane Stroke Group

Published Online: 22 APR 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 6 FEB 2014

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001920.pub3


How to Cite

Pollock A, Baer G, Campbell P, Choo PL, Forster A, Morris J, Pomeroy VM, Langhorne P. Physical rehabilitation approaches for the recovery of function and mobility following stroke. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD001920. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001920.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Glasgow Caledonian University, Nursing, Midwifery and Allied Health Professions Research Unit, Glasgow, UK

  2. 2

    Queen Margaret University, Department of Physiotherapy, Edinburgh, UK

  3. 3

    Glasgow Caledonian University, School of Health & Life Sciences, Glasgow, UK

  4. 4

    Bradford Institute for Health Research, Bradford Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust/University of Leeds, Academic Unit of Elderly Care and Rehabilitation, Bradford, UK

  5. 5

    University of Dundee, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Dundee, UK

  6. 6

    University of East Anglia, School of Rehabilitation Sciences, Norwich, UK

  7. 7

    University of Glasgow, Academic Section of Geriatric Medicine, Glasgow, UK

*Alex Pollock, Nursing, Midwifery and Allied Health Professions Research Unit, Glasgow Caledonian University, Buchanan House, Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow, G4 0BA, UK. alex.pollock@gcu.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (conclusions changed)
  2. Published Online: 22 APR 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Laienverständliche Zusammenfassung

Background

Various approaches to physical rehabilitation may be used after stroke, and considerable controversy and debate surround the effectiveness of relative approaches. Some physiotherapists base their treatments on a single approach; others use a mixture of components from several different approaches.

Objectives

To determine whether physical rehabilitation approaches are effective in recovery of function and mobility in people with stroke, and to assess if any one physical rehabilitation approach is more effective than any other approach.

For the previous versions of this review, the objective was to explore the effect of 'physiotherapy treatment approaches' based on historical classifications of orthopaedic, neurophysiological or motor learning principles, or on a mixture of these treatment principles. For this update of the review, the objective was to explore the effects of approaches that incorporate individual treatment components, categorised as functional task training, musculoskeletal intervention (active), musculoskeletal intervention (passive), neurophysiological intervention, cardiopulmonary intervention, assistive device or modality.

In addition, we sought to explore the impact of time after stroke, geographical location of the study, dose of the intervention, provider of the intervention and treatment components included within an intervention.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Stroke Group Trials Register (last searched December 2012), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library Issue 12, 2012), MEDLINE (1966 to December 2012), EMBASE (1980 to December 2012), AMED (1985 to December 2012) and CINAHL (1982 to December 2012). We searched reference lists and contacted experts and researchers who have an interest in stroke rehabilitation.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of physical rehabilitation approaches aimed at promoting the recovery of function or mobility in adult participants with a clinical diagnosis of stroke. Outcomes included measures of independence in activities of daily living (ADL), motor function, balance, gait velocity and length of stay. We included trials comparing physical rehabilitation approaches versus no treatment, usual care or attention control and those comparing different physical rehabilitation approaches.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently categorised identified trials according to the selection criteria, documented their methodological quality and extracted the data.

Main results

We included a total of 96 studies (10,401 participants) in this review. More than half of the studies (50/96) were carried out in China. Generally the studies were heterogeneous, and many were poorly reported.

Physical rehabilitation was found to have a beneficial effect, as compared with no treatment, on functional recovery after stroke (27 studies, 3423 participants; standardised mean difference (SMD) 0.78, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.58 to 0.97, for Independence in ADL scales), and this effect was noted to persist beyond the length of the intervention period (nine studies, 540 participants; SMD 0.58, 95% CI 0.11 to 1.04). Subgroup analysis revealed a significant difference based on dose of intervention (P value < 0.0001, for independence in ADL), indicating that a dose of 30 to 60 minutes per day delivered five to seven days per week is effective. This evidence principally arises from studies carried out in China. Subgroup analyses also suggest significant benefit associated with a shorter time since stroke (P value 0.003, for independence in ADL).

We found physical rehabilitation to be more effective than usual care or attention control in improving motor function (12 studies, 887 participants; SMD 0.37, 95% CI 0.20 to 0.55), balance (five studies, 246 participants; SMD 0.31, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.56) and gait velocity (14 studies, 1126 participants; SMD 0.46, 95% CI 0.32 to 0.60). Subgroup analysis demonstrated a significant difference based on dose of intervention (P value 0.02 for motor function), indicating that a dose of 30 to 60 minutes delivered five to seven days a week provides significant benefit. Subgroup analyses also suggest significant benefit associated with a shorter time since stroke (P value 0.05, for independence in ADL).

No one physical rehabilitation approach was more (or less) effective than any other approach in improving independence in ADL (eight studies, 491 participants; test for subgroup differences: P value 0.71) or motor function (nine studies, 546 participants; test for subgroup differences: P value 0.41). These findings are supported by subgroup analyses carried out for comparisons of intervention versus no treatment or usual care, which identified no significant effects of different treatment components or categories of interventions.

Authors' conclusions

Physical rehabilitation, comprising a selection of components from different approaches, is effective for recovery of function and mobility after stroke. Evidence related to dose of physical therapy is limited by substantial heterogeneity and does not support robust conclusions. No one approach to physical rehabilitation is any more (or less) effective in promoting recovery of function and mobility after stroke. Therefore, evidence indicates that physical rehabilitation should not be limited to compartmentalised, named approaches, but rather should comprise clearly defined, well-described, evidenced-based physical treatments, regardless of historical or philosophical origin.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Laienverständliche Zusammenfassung

Physical rehabilitation approaches for recovery of function, balance and walking after stroke

Question

We wanted to know whether physical rehabilitation approaches are effective in recovery of function and mobility in people with stroke, and if any one physical rehabilitation approach is more effective than any other approach.

Background

Stroke can cause paralysis of some parts of the body and other difficulties with various physical functions. Physical rehabilitation is an important part of rehabilitation for people who have had a stroke. Over the years, various approaches to physical rehabilitation have been developed, according to different ideas about how people recover after a stroke. Often physiotherapists will follow one particular approach, to the exclusion of others, but this practice is generally based on personal preference rather than scientific rationale. Considerable debate continues among physiotherapists about the relative benefits of different approaches; therefore it is important to bring together the research evidence and highlight what best practice ought to be in selecting these different approaches.

Study characteristics

We identified 96 studies, up to December 2012, for inclusion in the review. These studies, involving 10,401 stroke survivors, investigated physical rehabilitation approaches aimed at promoting recovery of function or mobility in adult participants with a clinical diagnosis of stroke compared with no treatment, usual care or attention control or in comparisons of different physical rehabilitation approaches. The average number of participants in each study was 105: most studies (93%) included fewer than 200 participants, one study had more than 1000 participants, six had between 250 and 100 participants and 10 had 20 or fewer participants. Outcomes included measures of independence in activities of daily living (ADL), motor function (functional movement), balance, walking speed and length of stay. More than half of the studies (50/96) were carried out in China. These studies showed many differences in relation to the type of stroke and how severe it was, as well as differences in treatment, which varied according to both treatment type and duration.

Key results

This review brings together evidence confirming that physical rehabilitation (often delivered by a physiotherapist, physical therapist or rehabilitation therapist) can improve function, balance and walking after stroke. It appears to be most beneficial when the therapist selects a mixture of different treatments for an individual patient from a wide range of available treatments.

We were able to combine the results from 27 studies (3243 stroke survivors) that compared physical rehabilitation versus no treatment. Twenty-five of these 27 studies were carried out in China. Results showed that physical rehabilitation improves functional recovery, and that this improvement may last long-term. When we looked at studies that compared additional physical rehabilitation versus usual care or a control intervention, we found evidence to show that the additional physical treatment improved motor function (12 studies, 887 stroke survivors), standing balance (five studies, 246 stroke survivors) and walking speed (14 studies, 1126 stroke survivors). Very limited evidence suggests that, for comparisons of physical rehabilitation versus no treatment and versus usual care, treatment that appeared to be effective was given between 30 and 60 minutes per day, five to seven days per week, but further research is needed to confirm this. We also found evidence of greater benefit associated with a shorter time since stroke, but again further research is needed to confirm this.

We found evidence showing that no one physical rehabilitation approach was more effective than any other approach. This finding means that physiotherapists should choose each individual patient's treatment according to the evidence available for that specific treatment, and should not limit their practice to a single 'named' approach.

Quality of the evidence

It was difficult for us to judge the quality of evidence because we found poor, incomplete or brief reporting of information. We determined that less than 50% of the studies were of good quality, and for most studies, the quality of the evidence was unclear from the information provided.

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Laienverständliche Zusammenfassung

Approches de rééducation pour la récupération fonctionnelle et la récupération de la mobilité après un accident vasculaire cérébral (AVC)

Contexte

Différentes approches pour la rééducation peuvent être utilisées après un AVC et l'efficacité des différentes approches fait l’objet de controverses et de débats. Certains rééducateurs fondent leurs traitements sur une seule approche; d'autres utilisent une combinaison de plusieurs approches différentes.

Objectifs

Déterminer si les approches de rééducation sont efficaces pour la récupération fonctionnelle et la récupération de la mobilité chez les personnes victimes d'AVC, et évaluer si l’une des approches de rééducation est plus efficace que les autres.

Pour les précédentes versions de cette revue, l'objectif avait été d'étudier l'effet des « approches de rééducation » selon les principes enseignés des catégories historiques, orthopédique, neurophysiologique ou moteur, ou sur une association de ces principes de traitement. Pour cette mise à jour de la revue, l'objectif était d'étudier les effets des approches qui incorporent des composantes individuelles du traitement, catégorisées en réentraînement aux tâches fonctionnelles, interventions musculo-squelettiques (actives) interventions musculo-squelettiques (passives), interventions neurophysiologiques, interventions cardio-pulmonaires, dispositifs ou modalités d'assistance.

En outre, nous avons cherché à examiner l'impact du délai après un accident vasculaire cérébral (AVC), le lieu géographique de l'étude, la dose de l'intervention, le prestataire de l'intervention et les composants de traitement inclus dans l’intervention.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le groupe Cochrane sur les accidents vasculaires cérébraux (dernière recherche en décembre 2012), le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (Bibliothèque Cochrane Numéro 12, 2012), MEDLINE (de 1966 à décembre 2012), EMBASE (de 1980 à décembre 2012), AMED (de 1985 à décembre 2012) et CINAHL (de 1982 à décembre 2012). Nous avons effectué des recherches dans les références bibliographiques et contacté des experts et des chercheurs qui s’intéressent à la réadaptation après un AVC.

Critères de sélection

Les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) des approches de rééducation visant à promouvoir la récupération fonctionnelle ou la récupération de la mobilité chez des participants adultes présentant un diagnostic clinique d'AVC. Les critères de jugement comprenaient des mesures de l'indépendance dans les activités de la vie quotidienne (AVQ), de la fonction motrice, de l'équilibre, de la vitesse de la marche et de la durée d'hospitalisation. Nous avons inclus les essais comparant les approches de rééducation à l'absence de traitement, aux soins habituels ou à une surveillance témoin et ceux comparant différentes approches de rééducation.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment catégorisé les essais identifiés selon les critères de sélection, documenté leur qualité méthodologique et extrait les données.

Résultats principaux

Nous avons inclus un total de 96 études (10 401 participants) dans cette revue. Plus de la moitié des études (50/96) ont été menées en Chine. Généralement les études étaient hétérogènes, et de nombreuses études étaient mal rapportées.

On a trouvé que la rééducation avait un effet bénéfique, en comparaison avec l'absence de traitement, sur la récupération fonctionnelle après un AVC (27 études, 3423 participants; différence moyenne standardisée (DMS) 0,78, intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % 0,58 à 0,97, pour les échelles d’AVQ) et cet effet a été noté comme persistant au-delà de la durée de la période d'intervention (neuf études, 540 participants ; DMS de 0,58, IC à 95 % 0,11 à 1,04). L'analyse en sous-groupe a révélé une différence significative selon la durée de l'intervention (valeur P < 0,0001, pour l'indépendance dans les AVQ), indiquant qu'une durée de 30 à 60 minutes par jour administrée cinq à sept jours par semaine était efficace. Ces preuves sont principalement issues d’études menées en Chine. Les analyses en sous-groupe suggèrent également un bénéfice significatif associé à un moindre délai depuis l'AVC (P = 0,003, pour l'indépendance dans les AVQ).

Nous avons trouvé que la rééducation était plus efficace que les soins habituels ou que la surveillance témoin pour améliorer la fonction motrice (12 études, 887 participants ; DMS de 0,37, IC à 95 % 0,20 à 0,55), l'équilibre (cinq études, 246 participants ; DMS de 0,31, IC à 95 % 0,05 à 0,56) et la la vitesse de la marche (14 études, 1126 participants ; DMS de 0,46, IC à 95 % 0,32 à 0,60). L'analyse en sous-groupe a démontré une différence significative selon la durée de l'intervention (P = 0,02 pour la fonction motrice), indiquant qu'une durée de 30 à 60 minutes administrée cinq à sept jours par semaine apporte un bénéfice significatif. Les analyses en sous-groupe suggèrent également un bénéfice significatif associé à un moindre délai après l'AVC (P = 0,05, pour l'indépendance dans les AVQ).

Aucune des approches de rééducation n’était plus (ou moins) efficace qu'une autre pour améliorer l'indépendance dans les AVQ (huit études, 491 participants ; test pour les différences en sous-groupes : valeur P 0,71) ou la fonction motrice (neuf études, 546 participants ; test pour les différences en sous-groupes : Valeur P 0,41). Ces résultats sont étayés par des analyses en sous-groupe réalisée pour les comparaisons d'intervention versus l'absence de traitement ou des soins habituels, ce qui a identifié l’absence d’effet significatif des différentes composantes ou des catégories d'interventions.

Conclusions des auteurs

La rééducation, comprenant une sélection de composants issus de différentes approches est efficace pour la récupération fonctionnelle et la récupération de la mobilité après un AVC. Les preuves relatives à la durée de rééducation sont limitées par une hétérogénéité substantielle et ne permettent pas des conclusions solides. Aucune des approches de rééducation n’est plus (ou moins) efficace pour promouvoir la récupération fonctionnelle et la récupération de la mobilité après un AVC. Par conséquent, les preuves indiquent que la rééducation ne devrait pas se limiter à des approches cloisonnées identifiées par un nom, mais devraient plutôt se composer de traitements de rééducation clairement définis, bien décrits, basés sur des preuves indépendamment de leur origine historique ou philosophique.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Laienverständliche Zusammenfassung

Approches de rééducation pour la récupération fonctionnelle et la récupération de l'équilibre et de la marche après un accident vasculaire cérébral (AVC)

Question

Nous voulions déterminer si des approches de rééducation étaient efficaces pour la récupération fonctionnelle et la récupération de la mobilité chez les personnes victimes d'AVC, et si l’une de ces approches était plus efficace que les autres.

Contexte

Un AVC peut paralyser certaines parties du corps et entraîner d'autres difficultés concernant diverses fonctions physiques. La rééducation est une partie importante de la réadaptation pour les personnes qui ont été victimes d'un AVC. Au fil des années, plusieurs approches de rééducation ont été développées, selon différentes idées sur la manière dont les personnes se rétablissent après un AVC. Souvent, les rééducateurs adopteront une approche particulière, à l'exclusion d'autres, mais cette pratique est généralement basée sur la préférence personnelle plutôt que sur une justification scientifique. De nombreux débats continuent chez les rééducateurs sur les avantages relatifs des différentes approches; par conséquent, il est important de rassembler les données de la recherche et de mettre en évidence les meilleures pratiques sélectionnant ces différentes approches.

Les caractéristiques de l'étude

Nous avons identifié 96 études, jusqu'à décembre 2012, pour l'inclusion dans la revue. Ces études, portant sur 10 401 victimes d'AVC, étudiaient les approches de rééducation visant à promouvoir la récupération fonctionnelle ou la récupération de la mobilité chez des participants adultes ayant un diagnostic clinique d'AVC par rapport à l'absence de traitement, à de soins habituels ou à une surveillance témoin ou dans les comparaisons de différentes approches de rééducation. Le nombre moyen de participants dans chaque étude était de 105 : la plupart des études (93 %) incluaient moins de 200 participants, une étude avait plus de 1000 participants, six avaient entre 250 et 100 participants et 10 avaient 20 participants ou moins. Les critères de jugement comprenaient des mesures de l'indépendance dans les activités de la vie quotidienne (AVQ), de la fonction motrice (mouvement fonctionnel), de l'équilibre, de la vitesse de la marche et de la durée d'hospitalisation. Plus de la moitié des études (50/96) ont été menées en Chine. Ces études présentaient de nombreuses différences relatives au type et à la gravité de l'AVC, ainsi que des différences dans les traitements, qui variaient dans leur type et dans leur durée.

Résultats principaux

Cette revue a réunit des preuves confirmant que la rééducation (souvent pratiquée par un physiothérapeute, un rééducateur ou un praticien de réadaptation) peut améliorer la fonction, l'équilibre et la marche après un AVC. Elle semble être la plus bénéfique lorsque le thérapeute sélectionne, pour un patient donné, une combinaison de différents traitements parmi un large éventail de traitements disponibles.

Nous avons été en mesure de combiner les résultats de 27 études (3243 survivants d'AVC) qui comparaient la rééducation à l'absence de traitement. Vingt-cinq de ces 27 études ont été menées en Chine. Les résultats ont montré que la rééducation améliore la récupération fonctionnelle et que cette amélioration peut perdurer à long terme. Lorsque nous avons examiné les études qui comparaient l’ajout de la rééducation aux soins habituels ou à une intervention de contrôle, nous avons trouvé des preuves montrant que l’ajout de la rééducation améliorait la fonction motrice (12 études, 887 victimes d'AVC), l'équilibre en position debout (cinq études, 246 victimes d'AVC) et la vitesse de la marche (14 études, 1126 victimes d'AVC). Dans les comparaisons de la rééducation à l'absence de traitement et à des soins habituels, des preuves très limitées suggèrent que le traitement qui semble efficace est administré entre 30 et 60 minutes par jour, cinq à sept jours par semaine, mais d'autres recherches sont nécessaires pour confirmer cela. Nous avons également identifié des preuves d'un plus grand bénéfice associé à un moindre délai après l'AVC, mais là encore d'autres recherches sont nécessaires pour confirmer cela.

Nous avons trouvé des preuves montrant qu’aucune des approches de rééducation n’était plus efficace qu'une autre. Ce résultat signifie que les rééducateurs devraient choisir le traitement de chaque patient selon les données probantes disponibles pour ce traitement et ne devraient pas limiter leur pratique à une seule approche identifiée par un nom.

Qualité des preuves

Il était difficile pour nous de juger de la qualité des preuves, car nous avons trouvé des informations pauvres, incomplètes ou succinctes. Nous avons déterminé que moins de 50 % des études étaient de bonne qualité, et pour la plupart des études, la qualité des preuves était incertaine à partir des informations fournies.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 31st July, 2014
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français

Traduction publiée en ligne le: 2014/4/22

 

Laienverständliche Zusammenfassung

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Laienverständliche Zusammenfassung

Körperliche Rehabilitationsansätze zur Wiederherstellung der Funktionsfähigkeit, des Gleichgewichts und des Gehens nach einem Schlaganfall

Frage

Wir wollten wissen, ob körperliche Rehabilitationssansätze wirksam sind in Bezug auf die Wiederherstellung der Funktionsfähigkeit und Mobilität (Beweglichkeit, Selbständigkeit) von Menschen mit einem Schlaganfall, und ob ein bestimmter körperlicher Rehabilitationsansatz wirksamer ist als alle anderen.

Hintergrund

Ein Schlaganfall kann zur Lähmung von Körperteilen und zu weiteren Schwierigkeiten mit verschiedenen Körperfunktionen führen. Die körperliche Rehabilitation ist ein wichtiger Bestandteil der Rehabilitation von Menschen, die einen Schlaganfall hatten. Im Laufe der Jahre sind aufgrund verschiedener Vorstellungen dazu, wie sich Menschen von einem Schlaganfall erholen, verschiedene Ansätze für die körperliche Rehabilitation entwickelt worden. Häufig verfolgen Physiotherapeuten einen bestimmten Ansatz unter Ausschluss anderer; dieses Vorgehen basiert jedoch im Allgemeinen auf persönlichen Vorlieben statt auf einer wissenschaftlichen Grundlage. Unter Physiotherapeuten dauert eine erhebliche Diskussion über die jeweiligen Vorteile verschiedener Ansätze an; aus diesem Grund ist es wichtig, die wissenschaftliche Evidenz (den wissenschaftlichen Kenntnisstand) zu diesem Thema zusammenzufassen, und aufzuzeigen, welches das beste Vorgehen bei der Auswahl der verschiedenen Ansätze sein sollte.

Studienmerkmale

Bis Dezember 2012 ermittelten wir insgesamt 96 Studien für den Einschluss in die Übersichtsarbeit. Diese Studien, die 10.401 Schlaganfallüberlebende einschlossen, untersuchten körperliche Rehabilitationsansätze mit dem Ziel der Verbesserung der Funktionsfähigkeit oder Mobilität (Beweglichkeit, Selbständigkeit) von Erwachsenen mit der klinischen Diagnose eines Schlaganfalls verglichen mit keiner Behandlung, der Regelversorgung (üblichen Versorgung), Konzentrationsübungen, oder in Vergleichen von verschiedenen körperlichen Rehabilitationsansätzen. Die durchschnittliche Anzahl von Teilnehmern je Studie betrug 105: die meisten Studien (93 %) umfassten weniger als 200 Teilnehmer, eine Studie hatte über 1000 Teilnehmer, sechs Studien hatten zwischen 250 und 100 Teilnehmer und 10 Studien hatten 20 oder weniger Teilnehmer. Die untersuchten Ziele umfassten Messungen der Unabhängigkeit in Aktivitäten des täglichen Lebens (ATL), der motorischen Funktionsfähigkeit (funktionelle Bewegungen), des Gleichgewichts, der Gehgeschwindigkeit sowie der Dauer des (Krankenhaus-) Aufenthaltes. Mehr als die Hälfte der Studien (50/96) wurden in China durchgeführt. Diese Studien wiesen viele Unterschiede im Hinblick auf die Art und den Schweregrad des Schlaganfalls auf, sowie Unterschiede in der Behandlung, die sowohl in der Behandlungsart als auch der Dauer variierten.

Hauptergebnisse

Diese Übersichtsarbeit trägt Evidenz zusammen, die bestätigt, dass eine körperliche (meist durch einen Physiotherapeuten oder Sporttherapeuten erbrachte) Rehabilitation die Funktionsfähigkeit, das Gleichgewicht und das Gehen nach einem Schlaganfall verbessern kann. Es scheint, dass es am besten ist, wenn der Therapeut für jeden Patient eine Mischung unterschiedlicher Ansätze aus einer großen Bandbreite verfügbarer Behandlungen auswählt.

Wir konnten die Ergebnisse von 27 Studien (3243 Schlaganfallüberlebende), in denen eine körperliche Rehabilitation mit keiner Behandlung verglichen wurde, statistisch (rechnerisch) zusammenfassen. Fünfundzwanzig von diesen 27 Studien wurden in China durchgeführt. Die Ergebnisse zeigten, dass eine körperliche Rehabilitation die funktionelle Genesung verbessert, und dass diese Verbesserung möglicherweise langfristig bestehen bleibt. Bei der Betrachtung von Studien, die eine zusätzliche körperliche Rehabilitation mit der Regelversorgung oder einer Kontrollbehandlung (anderen Behandlung) verglichen, fanden wir Evidenz dafür, dass die zusätzliche körperliche Behandlung motorische Funktionen (12 Studien, 887 Schlaganfallüberlebende), das Gleichgewicht im Stand (5 Studien, 246 Schlaganfallüberlebende) sowie die Gehgeschwindigkeit (14 Studien, 1126 Schlaganfallüberlebende) verbesserte. Eine sehr begrenzte Evidenz deutet darauf hin, dass, in Vergleichen einer körperlichen Rehabilitation gegenüber keiner Behandlung und der Regelversorgung, eine Behandlung, die wirksam zu sein schien, fünf bis sieben Mal pro Woche mit einer Dauer zwischen 30 und 60 Minuten täglich durchgeführt wurde. Weitere Forschung ist jedoch nötig, um dies zu bestätigen. Wir fanden zudem Evidenz für einen größeren Nutzen in Zusammenhang mit einer kürzeren Zeit seit dem Schlaganfall, aber auch hier ist weitere Forschung nötig, um dies zu bestätigen.

Wir fanden Evidenz dafür, dass kein bestimmter körperlicher Rehabilitationsansatz wirksamer war als ein anderer. Dieses Ergebnis bedeutet, dass Physiotherapeuten die Behandlung jedes einzelnen Patienten anhand der für diesen bestimmten Behandlungsansatz verfügbaren Evidenz auswählen und ihr Vorgehen nicht auf einen einzelnen bestimmten 'bestimmten' Behandlungsansatz beschränken sollten.

Qualität der Evidenz

Es war schwierig für uns die Qualität der Evidenz zu beurteilen, weil wir mangelhafte, unvollständige oder nur knappe Angaben von Informationen vorfanden. Wir stellten fest, dass weniger als 50% der Studien von guter Qualität waren, und für die meisten Studien war die Qualität der Evidenz aufgrund der bereit gestellten Informationen unklar.

Anmerkungen zur Übersetzung

Übersetzt von B. Elsner und C. Braun

Übersetzung publiziert am: 2014/4/22