Intervention Review

Cognitive-behavioural interventions for children who have been sexually abused

  1. Geraldine Macdonald1,*,
  2. Julian PT Higgins2,
  3. Paul Ramchandani3,
  4. Jeffrey C Valentine4,
  5. Latricia P Bronger5,
  6. Paul Klein5,
  7. Roland O'Daniel6,
  8. Mark Pickering5,
  9. Ben Rademaker5,
  10. George Richardson7,
  11. Matthew Taylor5

Editorial Group: Cochrane Developmental, Psychosocial and Learning Problems Group

Published Online: 16 MAY 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 26 MAR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001930.pub3

How to Cite

Macdonald G, Higgins JPT, Ramchandani P, Valentine JC, Bronger LP, Klein P, O'Daniel R, Pickering M, Rademaker B, Richardson G, Taylor M. Cognitive-behavioural interventions for children who have been sexually abused. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 5. Art. No.: CD001930. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001930.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    School of Sociology, Social Policy and Social Work, Queen's University Belfast, Director, Institute of Child Care Research, Belfast, Northern Ireland, UK

  2. 2

    MRC Biostatistics Unit, Cambridge, UK

  3. 3

    University of Oxford, Department of Psychiatry, Oxford, Oxfordshire, UK

  4. 4

    University of Louisville, Department of Educational and Counseling Psychology, Louisville, Kentucky, USA

  5. 5

    University of Louisville, Department of Teaching and Learning, Louisville, Kentucky, USA

  6. 6

    Collaborative for Teaching and Learning, Louisville, Kentucky, USA

  7. 7

    University of Cincinnati, School of Human Services, Cincinnati, Ohio, USA

*Geraldine Macdonald, Director, Institute of Child Care Research, School of Sociology, Social Policy and Social Work, Queen's University Belfast, 6 College Park, Belfast, Northern Ireland, BT7 1LP, UK. Geraldine.Macdonald@qub.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 16 MAY 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. 摘要

Background

Despite differences in how it is defined, there is a general consensus amongst clinicians and researchers that the sexual abuse of children and adolescents ('child sexual abuse') is a substantial social problem worldwide. The effects of sexual abuse manifest in a wide range of symptoms, including fear, anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder and various externalising and internalising behaviour problems, such as inappropriate sexual behaviours. Child sexual abuse is associated with increased risk of psychological problems in adulthood. Cognitive-behavioural approaches are used to help children and their non-offending or 'safe' parent to manage the sequelae of childhood sexual abuse. This review updates the first Cochrane review of cognitive-behavioural approaches interventions for children who have been sexually abused, which was first published in 2006.

Objectives

To assess the efficacy of cognitive-behavioural approaches (CBT) in addressing the immediate and longer-term sequelae of sexual abuse on children and young people up to 18 years of age.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2011 Issue 4); MEDLINE (1950 to November Week 3 2011); EMBASE (1980 to Week 47 2011); CINAHL (1937 to 2 December 2011); PsycINFO (1887 to November Week 5 2011); LILACS (1982 to 2 December 2011) and OpenGrey, previously OpenSIGLE (1980 to 2 December 2011). For this update we also searched ClinicalTrials.gov and the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP).

Selection criteria

We included randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials of CBT used with children and adolescents up to age 18 years who had experienced being sexually abused, compared with treatment as usual, with or without placebo control.

Data collection and analysis

At least two review authors independently assessed the eligibility of titles and abstracts identified in the search. Two review authors independently extracted data from included studies and entered these into Review Manager 5 software. We synthesised and presented data in both written and graphical form (forest plots).

Main results

We included 10 trials, involving 847 participants. All studies examined CBT programmes provided to children or children and a non-offending parent. Control groups included wait list controls (n = 1) or treatment as usual (n = 9). Treatment as usual was, for the most part, supportive, unstructured psychotherapy. Generally the reporting of studies was poor. Only four studies were judged 'low risk of bias' with regards to sequence generation and only one study was judged 'low risk of bias' in relation to allocation concealment. All studies were judged 'high risk of bias' in relation to the blinding of outcome assessors or personnel; most studies did not report on these, or other issues of bias. Most studies reported results for study completers rather than for those recruited.

Depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), anxiety and child behaviour problems were the primary outcomes. Data suggest that CBT may have a positive impact on the sequelae of child sexual abuse, but most results were not statistically significant. Strongest evidence for positive effects of CBT appears to be in reducing PTSD and anxiety symptoms, but even in these areas effects tend to be 'moderate' at best. Meta-analysis of data from five studies suggested an average decrease of 1.9 points on the Child Depression Inventory immediately after intervention (95% confidence interval (CI) decrease of 4.0 to increase of 0.4; I2 = 53%; P value for heterogeneity = 0.08), representing a small to moderate effect size. Data from six studies yielded an average decrease of 0.44 standard deviations on a variety of child post-traumatic stress disorder scales (95% CI 0.16 to 0.73; I2 = 46%; P value for heterogeneity = 0.10). Combined data from five studies yielded an average decrease of 0.23 standard deviations on various child anxiety scales (95% CI 0.3 to 0.4; I2 = 0%; P value for heterogeneity = 0.84). No study reported adverse effects.

Authors' conclusions

The conclusions of this updated review remain the same as those when it was first published. The review confirms the potential of CBT to address the adverse consequences of child sexual abuse, but highlights the limitations of the evidence base and the need for more carefully conducted and better reported trials.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. 摘要

Cognitive behavioural interventions for children who have been sexually abused

The sexual abuse of children is a substantial social problem that affects large numbers of children and young people worldwide. For many children, though not all, it can result in a range of psychological and behavioural problems, some of which can continue into adulthood. Knowing what is most likely to benefit children already traumatised by these events is important. This review aimed to find out if cognitive-behavioural approaches (CBT) help reduce the negative impact of sexual abuse on children. Ten studies, in which a total of 847 children participated, met the inclusion criteria for the review. The reporting of studies was poor, and there appear to be significant weaknesses in study quality. The evidence suggests that CBT may have a positive impact on the effects of child sexual abuse, including depression, post-traumatic stress and anxiety, but the results were generally modest. Implications for practice and further research are noted.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. 摘要

Interventions cognitivo-comportementales destinées aux enfants victimes d'abus sexuels

Contexte

Malgré des différences sur sa définition, il existe un consensus général entre les cliniciens et les chercheurs selon lequel l'abus sexuel d'enfants et d'adolescents (« abus sexuel d'enfants ») représente un problème social sérieux à l'échelle mondiale. Les effets de l'abus sexuel se manifestent sous la forme d'un large éventail de symptômes, notamment la peur, l'anxiété, le trouble de stress post-traumatique et plusieurs troubles comportementaux internalisés et externalisés, comme des comportements sexuels inappropriés. L'abus sexuel d'enfants est lié à un risque accru de problèmes psychologiques à l'âge adulte. Les approches cognitivo-comportementales permettent d'aider les enfants et leur parent non agresseur ou « sûr » à gérer les séquelles de l'abus sexuel vécu pendant l'enfance. La présente revue met à jour la première revue Cochrane concernant les approches cognitivo-comportementales chez les enfants victimes d'abus sexuels, publiée pour la première fois en 2006.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité des approches cognitivo-comportementales (TCC) pour traiter les séquelles immédiates et à long terme de l'abus sexuel chez les enfants et adolescents âgés de moins de 18 ans.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (2011, numéro 4) ; MEDLINE (de 1950 à la semaine 3 de novembre 2011) ; EMBASE (de 1980 à la semaine 47 de 2011) ; CINAHL (de 1937 au 2 décembre 2011) ; PsycINFO (de 1887 à la semaine 5 de novembre 2011) ; LILACS (de 1982 au 2 décembre 2011) et OpenGrey, précédemment connu sous le nom d'OpenSIGLE (de 1980 au 2 décembre 2011). Pour cette mise à jour, nous avons également effectué des recherches dans ClinicalTrials.gov et dans International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP).

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés ou quasi randomisés comparant un TCC, destiné à des enfants et des adolescents de moins de 18 ans victimes d'abus sexuels, à un traitement standard, avec ou sans contrôle placebo.

Recueil et analyse des données

Au moins deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment évalué l'éligibilité des titres et des résumés identifiés dans la recherche. Ces deux auteurs ont indépendamment extrait des données à partir des études incluses et les ont saisies dans le logiciel Review Manager 5. Nous avons synthétisé et présenté ces données sous forme écrite et graphique (graphiques en forêt).

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus 10 essais impliquant 847 participants. Toutes les études ont examiné les programmes TCC destinés aux enfants ou adolescents et à un parent non agresseur. Les groupes témoins incluaient des listes d'attente (n = 1) ou un traitement standard (n = 9). Le traitement standard consistait principalement en une psychothérapie de soutien et non structurée. La notification des études était généralement médiocre. Seules quatre études étaient considérées comme présentant de « faibles risques de biais » en termes de génération de séquences et une seule étude était considérée comme présentant de « faibles risques de biais » en termes d'assignation secrète. Toutes les études étaient considérées comme présentant des « risques de biais élevés » quant à la mise en aveugle des évaluateurs de résultats ou du personnel ; la majorité des études ne signalaient pas ces risques ou d'autres problèmes de biais. La plupart d'entre elles signalaient les résultats de personnes ayant participé intégralement à l'étude au lieu de celles recrutées.

La dépression, le trouble de stress post-traumatique (TSPT), l'anxiété et des troubles comportementaux chez l'enfant étaient les critères de jugement principaux. Les données suggèrent que le TCC peut avoir un impact positif sur les séquelles d'un enfant victime d'abus sexuel, mais la plupart des résultats n'étaient pas statistiquement significatifs. Les preuves les plus probantes concernant les effets positifs du TCC semblent être une diminution des symptômes du TSPT et de l'anxiété, mais ces effets ont tendance à être « modérés » tout au mieux pour ces catégories de symptômes. Une méta-analyse des données issues de cinq études suggérait une diminution moyenne de 1,9 point dans l'inventaire de dépression chez l'enfant immédiatement après une intervention (intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 %, baisse de 4,0 avec hausse de 0,4 ; I2 = 53 % ; valeur de p pour l'hétérogénéité = 0,08), ce qui représente une ampleur de l'effet petite à modérée. Les données de six études faisaient état d'une diminution moyenne de 0,44 écart type sur différentes échelles de troubles de stress post-traumatique chez l'enfant (IC à 95 % 0,16 à 0,73 ; I2 = 46 % ; valeur de p pour l'hétérogénéité = 0,10). Les données combinées de cinq études faisaient état d'une diminution moyenne de 0,23 écart type sur différentes échelles d'anxiété chez l'enfant (IC à 95 % 0,3 à 0,4 ; I2 = 0 % ; valeur de p pour l'hétérogénéité = 0,84). Aucune étude ne signalait des effets indésirables.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les conclusions de cette revue mise à jour restent identiques à celles de la première publication. La présente revue confirme le potentiel d'un TCC à traiter les conséquences néfastes d'un abus sexuel chez l'enfant, mais souligne les limites de la base de preuves et la nécessité de réaliser des essais correctement menés et mieux notifiés.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. 摘要

Interventions cognitivo-comportementales destinées aux enfants victimes d'abus sexuels

Interventions cognitivo-comportementales destinées aux enfants victimes d'abus sexuels

L'abus sexuel d'enfants est un problème social sérieux qui touche un grand nombre d'enfants et d'adolescents partout dans le monde. Chez nombre d'entre eux, du moins une partie, il peut engendrer tout un éventail de problèmes psychologiques et comportementaux dont certains peuvent persister jusqu'à l'âge adulte. Il est important de connaître ce qui peut être bénéfique pour les enfants déjà traumatisés par ces événements. La présente revue a pour objectif de déterminer si les approches cognitivo-comportementales (TCC) permettent de réduire l'impact négatif de l'abus sexuel chez les enfants. Dix études, totalisant 847 enfants, répondaient aux critères d'inclusion de cette revue. La notification des études était médiocre et la qualité méthodologique semble faire état de nombreux défauts. Les preuves suggèrent qu'une TCC peut avoir un impact positif sur les effets de l'abus sexuel d'enfants, y compris la dépression, le stress post-traumatique et l'anxiété, mais les résultats étaient généralement modestes. Les implications sur la pratique et des recherches supplémentaires sont notées.

Notes de traduction

Cette revue est co-enregistrée dans la Campbell Collaboration.

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 8th June, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français

 

摘要

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. 摘要

背景

曾被性虐待兒童的認知行為治療

雖然對於什麼導致了兒童性虐待有許多不同的觀點,然而臨床工作者與研究者普遍有共識這是一個確實存在的社會問題,並影響全世界為數不少的孩子與年輕人。性虐待的影響以廣泛的症狀來表現,包括害怕、焦慮、創傷後壓力疾患與行為問題,例如外化、內化,或是不適切的性行為。孩童性虐待和成年時期表現出較高風險的心理問題有關。知道什麼對這些已受到傷害的孩子們最可能有幫助的是重要的。

目標

本研究的目的在評估認知行為治療wghitivebeharioural approach (CBT) 對曾受過性虐待有立即及長期後遺症的孩童之療效。

搜尋策略

我們搜尋了,包括Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2005年第五期), MEDLINE (1966年至2005年11月); EMBASE (1980年至2005年11月); CINAHL (1982年至2005年11月), PsycINFO (1897年至2005年11月); LILACS (1982年至2005年11月); SIGLE (1980年至2005年11月) 以及the register of the Cochrane Developmental, Psychosocial and Learning Problems Group (2005年11月)

選擇標準

納入的研究是隨機或半隨機控制試驗,研究十八歲以下曾被性虐待的孩童及青少年接受認知行為治療的療效。

資料收集與分析

搜尋到的研究,由2位審查者 (GM與PR) 各自依標題及摘要評估是否符合收入資格。資料被摘錄並輸入REVMAN (JH與GM) ,再以文字與圖示 (forest plots) 形式作綜合與呈現。

主要結論

這個回顧包含了10個試驗共847位個案。資料顯示出CBT或許對於曾被性虐待的孩童後遺症有正向的影響,但大部份並沒有統計學上的顯著結果。

作者結論

這篇回顧肯定CBT有處理因孩童經驗性虐待後負面結果的潛力,但也突顯了實證依據的不足以及需要更仔細地執行與有較佳報告的試驗。

翻譯人

本摘要由成功大學附設醫院謝佩君翻譯。

此翻譯計畫由臺灣國家衛生研究院 (National Health Research Institutes, Taiwan) 統籌。

總結

兒童性虐待是一件影響全世界許多兒童及青少年的重要社會問題。構成許多的兒童 (但並非全部) 會有不同程度的心理與行為問題,部份問題甚至會延續至成年。知道什麼會對這些受到傷害的孩子們有幫助是相當重要的。本研究的目的在評估認知行為治療wghitivebeharioural approach (CBT) 對曾受過性虐待有立即及長期後遺症的孩童之療效。這個回顧文獻包含了10個試驗一共847位受試者。資料顯示出CBT或許對於孩童性虐待的後遺症結果有正向的影響,但大部份的結果並沒有統計學上的顯著意義。本回顧中並提出對臨床實務與未來研究之方向。