Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Pimozide for schizophrenia or related psychoses

  1. Meghana Mothi1,*,
  2. Stephanie Sampson2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Schizophrenia Group

Published Online: 5 NOV 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 17 MAY 2007

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001949.pub3


How to Cite

Mothi M, Sampson S. Pimozide for schizophrenia or related psychoses. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 11. Art. No.: CD001949. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD001949.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Newsam Centre, Seacroft Hospital, General Adult Psychiatry, Leeds, UK

  2. 2

    The University of Nottingham, Cochrane Schizophrenia Group, Nottingham, UK

*Meghana Mothi, General Adult Psychiatry, Newsam Centre, Seacroft Hospital, Leeds and York NHS Foundation Trust, York Road, Leeds, LS14 6WB, UK. m.mothi@nhs.net.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (conclusions changed)
  2. Published Online: 5 NOV 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Pimozide, formulated in the 1960s, continues to be marketed for the care of people with schizophrenia or related psychoses such as delusional disorder. It has been associated with cardiotoxicity and sudden unexplained death. Electrocardiogram monitoring is now required before and during use.

Objectives

To review the effects of pimozide for people with schizophrenia or related psychoses in comparison with placebo, no treatment or other antipsychotic medication.

A secondary objective was to examine the effects of pimozide for people with delusional disorder.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Schizophrenia Group's Register (28 January 2013).

Selection criteria

We sought all relevant randomised clinical trials (RCTs) comparing pimozide with other treatments.

Data collection and analysis

Working independently, we inspected citations, ordered papers and then re-inspected and assessed the quality of the studies and of extracted data. For homogeneous dichotomous data, we calculated the relative risk (RR), the 95% confidence interval (CI) and mean differences (MDs) for continuous data. We excluded data if loss to follow-up was greater than 50%. We assessed risk of bias for included studies and used GRADE to rate the quality of the evidence.

Main results

We included 32 studies in total: Among the five studies that compared pimozide versus placebo, only one study provided data for global state relapse, for which no difference between groups was noted at medium term (1 RCT n = 20, RR 0.22 CI 0.03 to 1.78, very low quality of evidence). None of the five studies provided data for no improvement or first-rank symptoms in mental state. Data for extrapyramidal symptoms demonstrate no difference between groups for Parkinsonism (rigidity) at short term (1 RCT, n = 19, RR 5.50 CI 0.30 to 101.28, very low quality of evidence) or at medium term (1 RCT n = 25, RR 1.33 CI 0.14 to 12.82, very low quality of evidence), or for Parkinsonism (tremor) at medium term (1 RCT n = 25, RR 1 CI 0.2 to 4.95, very low quality of evidence). No data were reported for quality of life at medium term.

Of the 26 studies comparing pimozide versus any antipsychotic, seven studies provided data for global state relapse at medium term, for which no difference was noted (7 RCTs n = 227, RR 0.82 CI 0.57 to 1.17, moderate quality of evidence). Data from one study demonstrated no difference in mental state (no improvement) at medium term (1 RCT n = 23, RR 1.09 CI 0.08 to 15.41, very low quality evidence); another study demonstrated no difference in the presence of first-rank symptoms at medium term (1 RCT n = 44, RR 0.53 CI 0.25 to 1.11, low quality of evidence). Data for extrapyramidal symptoms demonstrate no difference between groups for Parkinsonism (rigidity) at short term (6 RCTs n = 186, RR 1.21 CI 0.71 to 2.05,low quality of evidence) or medium term (5 RCTs n = 219, RR 1.12 CI 0.24 to 5.25,low quality of evidence), or for Parkinsonism (tremor) at medium term (4 RCTs n = 174, RR 1.46 CI 0.68 to 3.11, very low quality of evidence). No data were reported for quality of life at medium term.

In the one study that compared pimozide plus any antipsychotic versus the same antipsychotic, significantly fewer relapses were noted in the augmented pimozide group at medium term (1 RCT n = 69, RR 0.28 CI 0.15 to 0.50, low quality evidence). No data were reported for mental state outcomes or for extrapyramidal symptoms (EPS). Data were skewed for quality of life scores, which were not included in the meta-analysis but were presented separately.

Two studies compared pimozide plus any antipsychotics versus antipsychotic plus placebo; neither study reported data for outcomes of interest, apart from Parkinsonism at medium term and quality of life using the Specific Level of Functioning scale (SLOF); however, data were skewed.

Only one study compared pimozide plus any antipsychotic versus antipsychotics plus antipsychotic; no data were reported for global state and mental state outcomes of interest. Data were provided for Parkinsonism (rigidity and tremor) using the Extrapyramidal Symptom Rating Scale (ESRS); however, these data were skewed.

Authors' conclusions

Although shortcomings in the data are evident, enough overall consistency over different outcomes and time scales is present to confirm that pimozide is a drug with efficacy similar to that of other, more commonly used antipsychotic drugs such as chlorpromazine for people with schizophrenia. No data support or refute its use for those with delusional disorder.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Pimozide for schizophrenia or related psychoses

People with schizophrenia have ‘positive symptoms’ such as hearing voices and seeing things (hallucinations) and fixed strange beliefs (delusions). People with schizophrenia also have ‘negative symptoms’ such as tiredness, apathy and loss of emotion. Antipsychotic drugs are the main treatment for the symptoms of schizophrenia and can be grouped into older drugs (first generation or ‘typical’) and newer drugs (second generation or ‘atypical’). Pimozide is a ‘typical’ antipsychotic drug that was first introduced in the late 1960s and was given to people with schizophrenia. Pimozide is thought to be effective in treating the positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia or similar mental health problems such as delusional disorder, but it produces serious side effects such as muscle stiffness, tremors and slow body movements. Pimozide may also cause heart problems and has been linked to sudden unexplained death. Monitoring the heart via electrocardiogram is now required before and during treatment with pimozide. It is well known that people with mental health problems suffer from physical illnesses such as heart disease and diabetes and can die on average twenty years younger than those in the general population.
An update search for this review was carried out 28 January 2013; the review now includes 32 studies that assess the effects of pimozide for people with schizophrenia or similar mental health problems. Pimozide was compared with other antipsychotic drugs, placebo (‘dummy’ treatment) or no treatment. Results suggest that pimozide is probably just as effective as other commonly used ‘typical’ antipsychotic drugs (for outcomes such as treating mental state, relapse, leaving the study early). No studies included delusional disorders, so no information is available on this group of people. No evidence was found to support the concern that pimozide causes heart problems (although this may be result of the fact that the studies were small and short term and the participants did not receive doses above recommended limits of 20 mg/d). Pimozide may cause less sleepiness than other typical antipsychotic drugs, but it may cause more tremors and uncontrollable shaking. The claim that pimozide is useful for treating people with negative symptoms also is not supported and proven. However, the quality of evidence in the main was low or very low quality, studies were small and of short duration and were poorly reported. Large-scale, well-conducted and well-reported studies are required to assess the effectiveness of pimozide in the treatment of schizophrenia and other mental health problems such as delusional disorder.

This plain language summary has been written by a consumer, Benjamin Gray (Service User and Service User Expert, Rethink Mental Illness).

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Le pimozide dans la schizophrénie et les psychoses de même nature

Contexte

Le pimozide, formulé dans les années 1960, continue d'être commercialisé pour la prise en charge des patients atteints de schizophrénie ou de psychoses de même nature, telles que les troubles délirants. Il a été associé à une cardiotoxicité et à des morts subites inexpliquées. Une surveillance par électrocardiogramme doit être désormais réalisée avant et pendant son utilisation.

Objectifs

Examiner les effets du pimozide chez les patients atteints de schizophrénie ou de psychoses de même nature par rapport à un placebo, à l'absence de traitement ou à d'autres médicaments antipsychotiques.

Un objectif secondaire était d'examiner les effets du pimozide chez les patients atteints de troubles délirants.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre du groupe Cochrane sur la schizophrénie (28 janvier 2013).

Critères de sélection

Nous avons recherché tous les essais cliniques randomisés (ECR) comparant le pimozide à d'autres traitements.

Recueil et analyse des données

Travaillant de manière indépendante, nous avons examiné les références bibliographiques, obtenu les articles, puis nous avons réexaminé et évalué la qualité des études et des données extraites. Pour les données dichotomiques homogènes, nous avons calculé le risque relatif (RR), l'intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95% et les différences moyennes (DM) pour les données continues. Les données ont été exclues lorsque la perte de suivi était supérieure à 50%. Nous avons évalué le risque de biais des études incluses et utilisé le système GRADE pour estimer la qualité des preuves.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus 32 études au total: Parmi les cinq études comparant le pimozide à un placebo, une seule étude a fourni des données sur la rechute de l'état général, pour laquelle aucune différence entre les groupes n'a été notée à moyen terme (1 ECR n =20, RR de 0,22, IC à 95% 0,03 à 1,78, preuves de qualité très médiocre ). Aucune des cinq études n'a fourni des données sur l'absence d'amélioration des symptômes majeurs de l'état mental. Les données sur les symptômes extrapyramidaux n'ont démontré aucune différence entre les groupes pour ce qui concerne la rigidité parkinsonienne à court terme (1 ECR, n =19, RR 5,50 IC à 95% 0,30 à 101,28, preuves de qualité très médiocre ) ou à moyen terme (1 ECR, n =25, RR 1,33, IC à 95% 0,14 à 12,82, preuves de qualité très médiocre ), ou pour ce qui concerne les tremblements parkinsoniens à moyen terme (1 ECR, n =25, RR de 1, IC entre 0,2 et 4,95, preuves de qualité très médiocre ). Aucune donnée n'a été rapportée pour la qualité de vie à moyen terme.

Des 26 études comparant le pimozide à un antipsychotique, sept études ont fourni des données concernant la rechute de l'état général à moyen terme, pour laquelle aucune différence n'a été notée (7 ECR, n =227, RR 0,82, IC à 95% 0,57 à 1,17, preuves de qualité modérée ). Les données d'une étude n'a mis en évidence aucune différence dans l'état mental (pas d'amélioration) à moyen terme (1 ECR n =23, RR de 1,09, IC à 95% 0,08 à 15,41, preuves de qualité très médiocre ); une autre étude n'a mis en évidence aucune différence dans la présence de symptômes majeurs à moyen terme (1 ECR n =44, RR 0,53, IC à 95% 0,25 à 1,11, preuves de faible qualité ). Les données pour les symptômes extrapyramidaux n'ont démontré aucune différence entre les groupes en ce qui concerne la rigidité parkinsonienne à court terme (6 ECR, n =186, RR 1,21, IC à 95% 0,71 à 2,05, preuves de faible qualité ) ou à moyen terme (5 ECR, n =219, RR de 1,12, IC à 95% 0,24 à 5,25, preuves de faible qualité ), ou en ce qui concerne les tremblements parkinsoniens à moyen terme (4 ECR, n =174, RR 1,46, IC à 95% 0,68 à 3,11, preuves de qualité très médiocre ). Aucune donnée n'a été rapportée sur la qualité de vie à moyen terme.

Dans l'unique étude comparant du pimozide associé à un antipsychotique par rapport au même antipsychotique, significativement moins de rechutes étaient observées à moyen terme dans le groupe du pimozide associé (1 ECR n =69, RR de 0,28, IC à 95% 0,15 à 0,50, preuves de faible qualité ). Aucune donnée n'a été rapportée pour les critères de jugement de l'état mental et des symptômes extrapyramidaux (SEP). Données faussées pour les scores de qualité de vie, qui n'ont pas été inclus dans la méta-analyse, mais ont été présentées séparément.

Deux études comparaient le pimozide associé à un antipsychotique par rapport à un antipsychotique + un placebo; aucune étude ne rapportait de données pour les critères de jugement d'intérêt, hormis les syndromes Parkinsoniens à moyen terme et la qualité de vie à l'aide de l'échelle SLOF (Specific Level of Functioning); cependant, les données étaient biaisées.

Une seule étude a comparé le pimozide associé à un antipsychotique versus antipsychotiques+ antipsychotique; aucune donnée n'a été rapportée pour les critères de jugement d'intérêt sur l'état général et l'état mental. Les données ont été fournies pour les troubles parkinsoniens, (rigidité et tremblements) en utilisant l'échelle ESRS (Extrapyramidal Symptom Rating Scale) ; cependant, ces données étaient biaisées.

Conclusions des auteurs

Bien que les lacunes dans les données sont évidentes, suffisamment de cohérence globale pour différents critères de jugement et échelles de temps existe pour confirmer que le pimozide est un médicament avec une efficacité similaire à celui d'autres médicaments antipsychotiques plus couramment utilisés, tels que la chlorpromazine pour les personnes atteintes de schizophrénie. Les données ne permettent pas de recommander ou déconseiller son utilisation chez les patients atteints de troubles délirants.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Le pimozide dans la schizophrénie et les psychoses de même nature

Le pimozide dans la schizophrénie et les psychoses de même nature

Les personnes atteintes de schizophrénie ont des «symptômes positifs» comme entendre des voix et voir des choses (hallucinations) ou des croyances persistantes étranges (idées délirantes). Les personnes atteintes de schizophrénie ont également des «symptômes négatifs», comme la fatigue, l'apathie et la perte d'émotion. Les médicaments antipsychotiques constituent le principal traitement pour les symptômes de la schizophrénie et peuvent être regroupés en médicaments plus anciens (de première génération, ou "typiques") et en médicaments plus récents (de deuxième génération, ou «atypiques»). Le pimozide est un médicament antipsychotique typique , qui a été introduit pour la première fois à la fin des années 1960 pour être administré aux personnes souffrant de schizophrénie. Le pimozide est supposé être efficace pour traiter les symptômes positifs et négatifs de la schizophrénie et des problèmes similaires de santé mentale, tels que les troubles délirants, mais il produit des effets secondaires graves tels que rigidité musculaire, tremblements et ralentissements des mouvements corporels. Le pimozide pourrait également entraîner des problèmes cardiaques et a été associé à la mort subite inexpliquée. La surveillance du cœur par électrocardiogramme doit être désormais réalisée avant et pendant le traitement avec le pimozide. Il est bien connu que les personnes présentant des problèmes de santé mentale souffrent de maladies somatiques, telles que la maladie cardiaque ou le diabète et sont susceptibles de mourir, en moyenne, vingt ans avant les personnes de la population générale.
Une recherche de mise à jour pour cette revue a été effectuée le 28 janvier 2013; la revue inclut désormais 32 études évaluant les effets du pimozide chez les patients atteints de schizophrénie ou de problèmes similaires de santé mentale. Le pimozide était comparé à d'autres médicaments antipsychotiques, à un placebo (traitement factice) ou à une absence de traitement. Les résultats suggèrent que le pimozide est probablement juste aussi efficace que d'autres médicaments antipsychotiques typiques couramment utilisés (pour les critères de jugement tels que le traitement de l'état mental, les rechutes, l'abandon précoce de l'étude). Aucune étude n'a inclus les troubles délirants, de sorte qu' aucune information n'était disponible concernant ce groupe de patients. Aucune preuve n'a été trouvée pour étayer la préoccupation que le pimozide entraîne des problèmes cardiaques (bien que cela peut résulter du fait que les études étaient de petite taille et de court terme et que les participants n'ont pas reçu des doses supérieures à la dose recommandée limite de 20 mg/jour). Le pimozide pourrait entraîner moins de somnolence que d'autres médicaments antipsychotiques typiques, mais il peut entraîner davantage de tremblements et de mouvements incontrôlables. L'affirmation selon laquelle le pimozide est également utile pour traiter les personnes souffrant de symptômes négatifs n'est pas justifiée et n'est pas prouvée. Cependant, en général, la qualité des preuves était faible ou très faible, les études étaient de petite taille et de courte durée et ont été mal consignées. Des études à grande échelle bien conduites et bien documentées sont nécessaires pour évaluer l'efficacité du pimozide dans le traitement de la schizophrénie et d'autres problèmes de santé mentale, tels que les troubles délirants.

Ce résumé en langage simplifié a été rédigé par un usager, Benjamin Gray ( bénéficiaire du service et expert auprès des bénéficiaires du service, Rethink Mental Illness).

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 14th January, 2014
Traduction financée par: Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux