Intervention Review

Corticosteroids for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy

  1. Richard AC Hughes1,*,
  2. Man Mohan Mehndiratta2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group

Published Online: 15 AUG 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 20 FEB 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD002062.pub2

How to Cite

Hughes RAC, Mehndiratta MM. Corticosteroids for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 8. Art. No.: CD002062. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD002062.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, MRC Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, London, UK

  2. 2

    G.B. Pant Hospital, Department of Neurology, New Delhi, India

*Richard AC Hughes, MRC Centre for Neuromuscular Diseases, National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, PO Box 114, Queen Square, London, WC1N 3BG, UK. rhughes11@btinternet.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (conclusions changed)
  2. Published Online: 15 AUG 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is a progressive or relapsing and remitting paralysing illness probably due to an autoimmune response which should benefit from corticosteroids. Non-randomised studies suggest that corticosteroids are beneficial. Two commonly used corticosteroids are prednisone and prednisolone. Both are usually given as oral tablets. Prednisone is converted into prednisolone in the liver so that the effect of the two drugs is usually the same. Another corticosteroid, called dexamethasone, is more potent and is used in smaller doses.

Objectives

To evaluate the efficacy of corticosteroid treatment compared to placebo or no treatment for CIDP and to compare the efficacy of different corticosteroid regimes.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Neuromuscular Disease Group Specialized Register (20 February 2012), CENTRAL (2012, Issue 2), MEDLINE (January 1966 to February 2012), and EMBASE (January 1980 to February 2012) for randomised trials of corticosteroids for CIDP.

Selection criteria

We included randomised or quasi-randomised trials of treatment with any form of corticosteroids or adrenocorticotrophic hormone for CIDP, diagnosed by an internationally accepted definition.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors extracted the data and assessed risk of bias independently. The primary outcome was intended to be change in disability, with secondary outcomes of change in impairment, maximum motor nerve conduction velocity, or compound muscle action potential amplitude after 12 weeks, and adverse events.

Main results

In one non-blinded randomised controlled trial (RCT) with 35 eligible participants, the primary outcome for this review was not available. Twelve of 19 participants treated with prednisone, compared with five of 16 participants randomised to no treatment, had improved neuropathy impairment scores after 12 weeks; the risk ratio (RR) for improvement was 2.02 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.90 to 4.52). Adverse events were not reported in detail, but one prednisone-treated participant died.

In a double-blind RCT comparing daily standard-dose oral prednisolone with monthly high-dose oral dexamethasone in 40 participants, none of the outcomes for this review were available. There were no significant differences in remission (RR 1.11; 95% CI 0.50 to 2.45 in favour of monthly dexamethasone) or change in disability or impairment after one year. Eight of 16 in the prednisolone, and seven of 24 in the dexamethasone group deteriorated. Adverse events were similar with each regimen, except that sleeplessness and moon facies (moon-shaped appearance of the face) were significantly less common with monthly dexamethasone.

Experience from large non-randomised studies suggests that corticosteroids are beneficial, but long-term use causes serious side effects.

Authors' conclusions

Very low quality evidence from one small, randomised trial did not show a statistically significant benefit from oral prednisone compared with no treatment. Nevertheless, corticosteroids are commonly used in practice. According to moderate quality evidence from one RCT, the efficacy of high-dose monthly oral dexamethasone was not statistically different from that of daily standard-dose oral prednisolone. Most adverse events occurred with similar frequencies in both groups, but sleeplessness and moon facies were significantly less common with monthly dexamethasone. Further research is needed to identify factors which predict response.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Corticosteroids for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy

Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) is an uncommon, progressive or relapsing paralysing disease, caused by inflammation of the peripheral nerves. It is characterised by slowly evolving weakness and numbness of the limbs. It is thought to be caused by an autoimmune reaction in which the immune system mistakenly attacks the myelin sheaths surrounding the conducting cores of the nerve fibres. Two RCTs were relevant to this review.

One trial with 35 participants compared corticosteroids with no treatment. This provided only very low quality evidence of a beneficial effect. Nevertheless corticosteroids are commonly used in practice, based on favourable reports from non-randomised studies. Some people given corticosteroids have worsened. There is no reliable way of predicting who will improve and who will worsen.

The other trial with 41 participants compared two different corticosteroid regimes. This provided moderate quality evidence that standard-dose daily oral corticosteroid (prednisolone) treatment has the same benefit as high-dose oral corticosteroid (dexamethasone) treatment given on four consecutive days each month. Prednisolone is the standard oral preparation of corticosteroids and dexamethasone a more potent preparation with a similar mechanism of action which can be given in a smaller dose. These two regimes had similar side effects, except that sleeplessness and a moon-shaped appearance of the face were significantly less common with high-dose monthly treatment. Corticosteroids are known to have serious long-term side effects which cannot be adequately captured in short-term trials.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Corticostéroïdes dans le traitement de la polyradiculoneuropathie démyélinisante inflammatoire chronique

Contexte

La polyradiculoneuropathie démyélinisante inflammatoire chronique (PDIC) est une maladie paralysante progressive ou récurrente et rémittente probablement due à une réponse auto-immune contre laquelle les corticostéroïdes devraient être bénéfiques. Les études non randomisées suggèrent que les corticostéroïdes sont bénéfiques. Deux corticostéroïdes utilisés couramment sont la prednisone et la prednisolone. Les deux sont généralement administrés sous la forme de comprimés. La prednisone est convertie en prednisolone dans le foie, de sorte que l'effet des deux médicaments est généralement le même. Un autre corticostéroïde, appelé dexaméthasone, est plus puissant et est utilisé à plus faibles doses.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité du traitement aux corticostéroïdes comparé à un placebo ou à l'absence de traitement contre la PDIC et comparer l'efficacité de différentes posologies de corticostéroïdes.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué une recherche d'essais randomisés portant sur les corticostéroïdes contre la PDIC dans le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les affections neuro-musculaires (le 20 février 2012), CENTRAL (2012, numéro 2), MEDLINE (de janvier 1966 à février 2012) et EMBASE (de janvier 1980 à février 2012).

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus les essais randomisés ou quasi-randomisés portant sur le traitement avec toute forme de corticostéroïdes ou avec l'hormone adrénocorticotrope contre la PDIC diagnostiquée selon une définition acceptée internationalement.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont extrait les données et évalué le risque de biais de manière indépendante. Le critère de jugement principal était supposé être le changement du degré d'incapacité, les critères de jugement secondaires étant le changement de l'altération, la vitesse de conduction nerveuse motrice maximale ou l'amplitude du potentiel d'action musculaire composé après 12 semaines, et les événements indésirables.

Résultats Principaux

Dans un essai contrôlé randomisé (ECR) non mis en aveugle portant sur 35 participants éligibles, le critère de jugement principal pour cette revue n'était pas disponible. Douze participants sur 19 traités à la prednisone, comparé à cinq participants sur 16 randomisés dans un groupe sans traitement, présentaient des scores d'aggravation des neuropathies améliorés après 12 semaines ; le risque relatif (RR) pour l'amélioration était de 2,02 (intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % 0,90 à 4,52). Les événements indésirables n'étaient pas indiqués en détail, mais un participant traité à la prednisone est décédé.

Dans un ECR en double aveugle comparant la prednisolone orale en dose standard quotidienne à la dexaméthasone orale à forte dose mensuelle chez 40 participants, aucun des critères de jugement pour cette revue n'était disponible. Il n'y avait aucune différence significative en termes de rémission (RR 1,11 ; IC à 95 % 0,50 à 2,45 en faveur de la dexaméthasone mensuelle) ou de changement du degré d'incapacité ou de l'altération après un an. Huit participants sur 16 dans le groupe de la prednisolone et sept participants sur 24 dans le groupe de la dexaméthasone ont vu leur état se détériorer. Les événements indésirables ont été semblables avec chaque posologie, si ce n'est que la perte de sommeil et les visages ronds (aspect en forme de lune du visage) ont été significativement moins courants avec le traitement mensuel à la dexaméthasone.

L'expérience issue d'études non randomisées à grande échelle suggère que les corticostéroïdes sont bénéfiques, mais l'utilisation à long terme provoque de graves effets secondaires.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les preuves de très faible qualité issues d'un essai randomisé, réalisé à petite échelle, n'ont pas montré de bénéfice statistiquement significatif de la prednisone par voie orale comparé à l'absence de traitement. Néanmoins, les corticostéroïdes sont couramment utilisés dans la pratique. D'après des preuves de qualité modérée issues d'un ECR, l'efficacité de la dexaméthasone orale mensuelle à forte dose n'a pas été statistiquement différente de celle de la prednisolone orale en dose standard quotidienne. La plupart des événements indésirables sont intervenus à des fréquences similaires dans les deux groupes, mais la perte de sommeil et le visage rond ont été significativement moins courants avec la dexaméthasone mensuelle. Des recherches supplémentaires sont nécessaires pour identifier les facteurs permettant de prévoir la réponse.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Corticostéroïdes dans le traitement de la polyradiculoneuropathie démyélinisante inflammatoire chronique

Corticostéroïdes dans le traitement de la polyradiculoneuropathie démyélinisante inflammatoire chronique

La polyradiculoneuropathie démyélinisante inflammatoire chronique (PDIC) est une maladie paralysante rare, progressive ou récurrente, provoquée par l'inflammation des nerfs périphériques. Elle se caractérise par une faiblesse et un engourdissement des membres à évolution lente. On pense qu'elle est provoquée par une réaction auto-immune du système immunitaire qui attaque par erreur la gaine de myéline entourant le noyau conducteur des fibres nerveuses. Deux ECR étaient pertinents pour cette revue.

Un essai, portant sur 35 participants, comparait des corticostéroïdes à l'absence de traitement. Cela n'a fourni des preuves d'un effet bénéfique n'ayant qu'une très faible qualité. Néanmoins, les corticostéroïdes sont couramment utilisés dans la pratique, sur la base de rapports favorables issus d'études non randomisées. Certaines personnes recevant des corticostéroïdes ont vu leur état s'aggraver. Il n'existe pas de manière fiable de prévoir qui verra son état s'améliorer et qui verra son état s'aggraver.

L'autre essai, portant sur 41 participants, comparait deux traitements différents aux corticostéroïdes. Cela a donné des preuves de qualité modérée indiquant que le traitement aux corticostéroïdes oraux (prednisolone) en dose standard quotidienne présentait les mêmes bénéfices que le traitement aux corticostéroïdes oraux (dexaméthasone) à forte dose administré pendant quatre jours consécutifs chaque mois. La prednisolone est la préparation de corticostéroïdes par voie orale standard et la dexaméthasone est une préparation plus puissante, avec un mécanisme d'action semblable, qui peut être administrée à dose plus faible. Ces deux posologies ont eu des effets secondaires semblables, si ce n'est que la perte de sommeil et l'aspect en forme de lune du visage ont été significativement moins courants avec le traitement mensuel à forte dose. Les corticostéroïdes sont connus pour avoir de graves effets secondaires à long terme qui ne peuvent pas être identifiés de manière adéquate dans des essais à court terme.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 13th September, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français