Intervention Review

Neuraminidase inhibitors for preventing and treating influenza in children (published trials only)

  1. Kay Wang1,
  2. Matthew Shun-Shin2,
  3. Peter Gill1,
  4. Rafael Perera1,
  5. Anthony Harnden1,*

Editorial Group: Cochrane Acute Respiratory Infections Group

Published Online: 18 APR 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 25 JAN 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD002744.pub4


How to Cite

Wang K, Shun-Shin M, Gill P, Perera R, Harnden A. Neuraminidase inhibitors for preventing and treating influenza in children (published trials only). Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD002744. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD002744.pub4.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Oxford, Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, Oxford, Oxon, UK

  2. 2

    Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK

*Anthony Harnden, Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, 2nd floor, 23-38 Hythe Bridge Street, Oxford, Oxon, OX1 2ET, UK. anthony.harnden@phc.ox.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 18 APR 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

During epidemics, influenza attack rates in children may exceed 40%. Options for prevention and treatment currently include the neuraminidase inhibitors zanamivir and oseltamivir. Laninamivir octanoate, the prodrug of laninamivir, is currently being developed.

Objectives

To assess the efficacy, safety and tolerability of neuraminidase inhibitors in the treatment and prevention of influenza in children.

Search methods

For this update we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 1) which includes the Acute Respiratory Infections Group's Specialised Register, MEDLINE (1966 to January week 2, 2011) and EMBASE (January 2010 to January 2011).

Selection criteria

Double-blind, randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing neuraminidase inhibitors with placebo or other antiviral drugs in children aged up to and including 12 years. We also included safety and tolerability data from other types of studies.

Data collection and analysis

Four review authors selected studies, assessed study quality and extracted data for the current and previous versions of this review. We analysed data separately for oseltamivir versus placebo, zanamivir versus placebo and laninamivir octanoate versus oseltamivir.

Main results

Six treatment trials involving 1906 children with clinical influenza and 450 children with influenza diagnosed on rapid near-patient influenza testing were included. Of these 2356 children, 1255 had laboratory-confirmed influenza. Three prophylaxis trials involving 863 children exposed to influenza were also included. In children with laboratory-confirmed influenza oseltamivir reduced median duration of illness by 36 hours (26%, P < 0.001). One trial of oseltamivir in children with asthma who had laboratory-confirmed influenza showed only a small reduction in illness duration (10.4 hours, 8%), which was not statistically significant (P = 0.542). Laninamivir octanoate 20 mg reduced symptom duration by 2.8 days (60%, P < 0.001) in children with oseltamivir-resistant influenza A/H1N1. Zanamivir reduced median duration of illness by 1.3 days (24%, P < 0.001). Oseltamivir significantly reduced acute otitis media in children aged one to five years with laboratory-confirmed influenza (risk difference (RD) -0.14, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.24 to -0.04). Prophylaxis with either zanamivir or oseltamivir was associated with an 8% absolute reduction in developing influenza after the introduction of a case into a household (RD -0.08, 95% CI -0.12 to -0.05, P < 0.001). The adverse event profile of zanamivir was no worse than placebo but vomiting was more commonly associated with oseltamivir (number needed to harm = 17, 95% CI 10 to 34). The adverse event profiles of laninamivir octanoate and oseltamivir were similar.

Authors' conclusions

Oseltamivir and zanamivir appear to have modest benefit in reducing duration of illness in children with influenza. However, our analysis was limited by small sample sizes and an inability to pool data from different studies. In addition, the inclusion of data from published trials only may have resulted in significant publication bias. Based on published trial data, oseltamivir reduces the incidence of acute otitis media in children aged one to five years but is associated with a significantly increased risk of vomiting. One study demonstrated that laninamivir octanoate was more effective than oseltamivir in shortening duration of illness in children with oseltamivir-resistant influenza A/H1N1. The benefit of oseltamivir and zanamivir in preventing the transmission of influenza in households is modest and based on weak evidence. However, the clinical efficacy of neuraminidase inhibitors in 'at risk' children is still uncertain. Larger high-quality trials are needed with sufficient power to determine the efficacy of neuraminidase inhibitors in preventing serious complications of influenza (such as pneumonia or hospital admission), particularly in 'at risk' groups.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Neuraminidase inhibitors for preventing and treating influenza in children

Influenza (true 'flu) is an infection of the airways caused by the Influenza group of viruses. Influenza occurs most commonly during winter months and can result in symptoms such as fever, cough, sore throat, headache, muscle aches and fatigue. These are usually self limiting but may persist for one to two weeks. The most common complications of influenza are secondary bacterial infections including otitis media (ear infections) and pneumonia. Influenza infection is also highly contagious and is spread from person-to-person by droplets produced when an infected individual coughs or sneezes.

This update reviews the randomised controlled trial evidence of a class of drugs called the neuraminidase inhibitors in treating and preventing influenza in children. Neuraminidase inhibitors work against influenza by preventing viruses from being released from infected cells and subsequently infecting further cells. Oseltamivir (Tamiflu), an oral medication, and zanamivir (Relenza), an inhaled medication, are currently licensed, whilst laninamivir is undergoing Phase III clinical trials. Neuraminidase inhibitors are usually prescribed to patients presenting with flu-like symptoms during epidemic periods to reduce symptoms or prevent spread of the virus.

We included six treatment trials involving 1906 children with clinically suspected influenza and 450 children with influenza diagnosed on rapid influenza testing. Of these 2356 children, 1255 had proven influenza infection confirmed on laboratory testing. We also included three trials of neuraminidase inhibitors for the prevention of influenza, which involved 863 children who had been exposed to influenza.

This review found that treatment with neuraminidase inhibitors was only associated with modest clinical benefit in children with proven influenza. Treatment with oseltamivir or zanamivir shortened the duration of illness in healthy children by about one day. One trial demonstrated that the new neuraminidase inhibitor drug laninamivir reduces duration of illness by almost three days in children with oseltamivir-resistant influenza. The effect of neuraminidase inhibitors in preventing transmission of influenza was also modest; 13 children would need to be treated to prevent one additional case. Neuraminidase inhibitors are generally well tolerated but there will be one extra case of vomiting for every 17 children treated with oseltamivir. Other side effects such as diarrhoea and nausea were no more common in children treated with neuraminidase inhibitors compared to placebo. There is currently no high-quality evidence to support targeted treatment of 'at risk' children (with underlying chronic medical conditions) with neuraminidase inhibitors.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Inhibiteurs de la neuraminidase dans la prévention et le traitement de la grippe chez les enfants

Contexte

Lors de périodes épidémiques, les taux d'attaque de la grippe chez les enfants peuvent dépasser 40 %. Les options de prévention et de traitement sont actuellement les inhibiteurs de la neuraminidase, le zanamivir et l'oseltamivir. Le laninamivir octanoate, promédicament du laninamivir, est actuellement en cours de développement.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité, l'innocuité et la tolérabilité des inhibiteurs de la neuraminidase pour le traitement et la prévention de la grippe chez les enfants.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Pour cette mise à jour, nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2011, numéro 1), qui contient le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les infections respiratoires aiguës, MEDLINE (1966 à la semaine 2 de janvier 2011) et EMBASE (janvier 2010 à janvier 2011).

Critères de sélection

Des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR), en double aveugle, comparant les inhibiteurs de la neuraminidase à un placebo ou d'autres médicaments antiviraux chez les enfants âgés de 12 ans au maximum. Nous avons également inclus des données relatives à l'innocuité et la tolérabilité issues d'autres types d'études.

Recueil et analyse des données

Quatre auteurs de la revue ont sélectionné des études, évalué leur qualité et extrait des données pour les versions actuelles et précédentes de cette revue. Nous avons analysé séparément les données comparant l'oseltamivir à un placebo, le zanamivir à un placebo et le laninamivir octanoate à l'oseltamivir.

Résultats Principaux

Six essais de traitement étaient inclus avec un total de 1 906 enfants souffrant d'une grippe clinique et 450 enfants souffrant d'une grippe diagnostiquée à l'aide d'un test grippal rapide réalisé au chevet du patient. Sur ces 2 356 enfants, 1 255 présentaient des cas de grippe confirmés en laboratoire. Trois essais portant sur la prophylaxie et incluant 863 enfants exposés à la grippe étaient également inclus. Chez les enfants dont les cas de grippe étaient confirmés en laboratoire, l'oseltamivir a réduit la durée moyenne de la maladie de 36 heures (26 %, P < 0,001). Un essai portant sur la prise d'oseltamivir chez les enfants asthmatiques, présentant des cas de grippe confirmés en laboratoire, ne révélait qu'une baisse minime de la durée de la maladie (10,4 heures, 8 %), ce qui n'était pas statistiquement significatif (P = 0,542). Une dose de 20 mg de laninamivir octanoate a réduit la durée des symptômes de 2,8 jours (60 %, P < 0,001) chez les enfants souffrant de la grippe A/H1N1 résistante à l'oseltamivir. Le zanamivir a réduit la durée moyenne de la maladie de 1,3 jour (24 %, P < 0,001). L'oseltamivir a sensiblement réduit les cas d'otites aiguës chez les enfants âgés de 1 à 5 ans et souffrant de cas de grippe confirmés en laboratoire (différence de risques (DR) - 0,14, intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % - 0,24 à - 0,04). La prophylaxie avec le zanamivir ou l'oseltamivir était liée à une baisse absolue de 8 % du développement de la grippe après avoir introduit un cas dans un foyer (DR - 0,08, IC à 95 % - 0,12 à - 0,05, P < 0,01). Le profil des événements indésirables du zanamivir n'était pas plus mauvais que celui d'un placebo, mais les cas de vomissement étaient plus couramment associés à l'oseltamivir (nombre de patients pour observer un évènement négatif = 17, IC à 95 % 10 à 34). Les profils des événements indésirables du laninamivir octanoate et de l'oseltamivir étaient similaires.

Conclusions des auteurs

L'oseltamivir et le zanamivir semblent avoir des effets bénéfiques modestes sur la baisse de la durée de la maladie chez les enfants atteints de grippe. Toutefois, notre analyse était limitée en raison de la taille réduite des échantillons et de l'impossibilité de regrouper les données issues de différentes études. L'oseltamivir réduit l'incidence des cas d'otites moyennes aiguës chez les enfants âgés de 1 à 5 ans, mais il est lié à une aggravation des cas de vomissement. Une étude a démontré que le laninamivir octanoate était plus efficace que l'oseltamivir en termes de raccourcissement de la durée de la maladie chez les enfants souffrant de la grippe A/H1N1 résistante à l'oseltamivir. Les avantages de l'oseltamivir et du zanamivir en termes de prévention de la transmission de la grippe dans les foyers sont modestes et reposent sur des preuves insuffisantes. Toutefois, l'efficacité clinique des inhibiteurs de la neuraminidase chez les enfants « à risque » reste incertaine. Des essais à plus grande échelle et de qualité supérieure sont nécessaires avec une puissance statistique suffisante afin de déterminer l'efficacité des inhibiteurs de la neuraminidase dans le cadre de la prévention de complications graves de la grippe (comme la pneumonie ou une hospitalisation), plus particulièrement chez les groupes « à risque ».

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Inhibiteurs de la neuraminidase dans la prévention et le traitement de la grippe chez les enfants

Inhibiteurs de la neuraminidase dans la prévention et le traitement de la grippe chez les enfants

La grippe (la « vraie » grippe) est une infection des voies respiratoires causée par le groupe de virus de la grippe. Elle apparaît généralement pendant les mois d'hiver et se caractérise par les symptômes suivants : fièvre, toux, maux de gorge, maux de tête, courbatures et fatigue. Ces derniers guérissent souvent spontanément, mais peuvent persister pendant une à deux semaines. Les complications les plus courantes de la grippe sont des infections bactériennes secondaires, notamment l'otite moyenne (infections de l'oreille) et la pneumonie. La grippe est aussi très contagieuse et se transmet de personne à personne par le biais de gouttelettes en suspension projetées dans l'air après qu'un malade ait toussé ou éternué.

Cette mise à jour passe en revue les preuves issues d'un essai contrôlé randomisé portant sur une catégorie de médicaments appelés « inhibiteurs de la neuraminidase » et destinés au traitement et à la prévention de la grippe chez les enfants. Les inhibiteurs de la neuraminidase agissent contre la grippe en empêchant la propagation des virus à partir des cellules infectées et donc la contamination d'autres cellules. L'oseltamivir (Tamiflu), médicament oral, et le zanamivir (Relenza), médicament en aérosol, sont actuellement homologués, alors que le laninamivir est soumis à des essais cliniques de phase III. Les inhibiteurs de la neuraminidase sont généralement prescrits aux patients présentant des symptômes grippaux lors des périodes épidémiques afin de réduire les symptômes ou éviter la propagation du virus.

Nous avons inclus six essais de traitement comprenant 1 906 enfants souffrant d'une grippe cliniquement suspectée et 450 enfants atteints de la grippe diagnostiquée à l'aide d'un test rapide. Sur ces 2 356 enfants, 1 255 étaient atteints d'une grippe avérée confirmée par un test réalisé en laboratoire. Nous avons également inclus trois essais portant sur les inhibiteurs de la neuraminidase pour la prévention de la grippe et réalisés auprès de 863 enfants ayant été exposés à la grippe.

Cette revue a révélé que le traitement à base d'inhibiteurs de la neuraminidase était uniquement associé à des effets bénéfiques cliniques modestes chez les enfants souffrant d'une grippe avérée. Un traitement à base d'oseltamivir ou de zanamivir écourtait la durée de la maladie chez les enfants en bonne santé d'environ un jour. Un essai révélait que le laninamivir, nouveau médicament à base d'inhibiteurs de la neuraminidase, réduisait la durée de la maladie d'environ trois jours chez les enfants souffrant de la grippe résistante à l'oseltamivir. Les effets des inhibiteurs de la neuraminidase étaient aussi modestes quant à la prévention de la transmission de la grippe ; 13 enfants devraient être traités pour prévenir l'apparition d'un cas supplémentaire. Les inhibiteurs de la neuraminidase sont généralement bien tolérés, mais un cas supplémentaire présentera des nausées sur 17 enfants traités à l'oseltamivir. D'autres effets secondaires, comme des diarrhées et des nausées, n'étaient plus courants chez les enfants traités avec des inhibiteurs de la neuraminidase par rapport à un placebo. À l'heure actuelle, aucune preuve probante ne permet de corroborer le traitement ciblé des enfants « à risque » (état chronique sous-jacent) avec des inhibiteurs de la neuraminidase.

Notes de traduction

Cette revue mise à jour en 2011 sera supplantée par la revue de Jefferson 2011 Neuraminidase inhibitors for preventing and treating influenza in healthy adults and children.

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 10th April, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français