Intervention Review

Rehabilitation after lumbar disc surgery

  1. Teddy Oosterhuis1,
  2. Leonardo OP Costa2,
  3. Christopher G Maher3,
  4. Henrica CW de Vet4,
  5. Maurits W van Tulder1,
  6. Raymond WJG Ostelo5,*

Editorial Group: Cochrane Back Group

Published Online: 14 MAR 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 1 MAY 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003007.pub3


How to Cite

Oosterhuis T, Costa LOP, Maher CG, de Vet HCW, van Tulder MW, Ostelo RWJG. Rehabilitation after lumbar disc surgery. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 3. Art. No.: CD003007. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003007.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    VU University, Department of Health Sciences, Faculty of Earth and Life Sciences, Amsterdam, Netherlands

  2. 2

    Universidade Cidade de São Paulo, Masters in Physical Therapy, São Paulo, Brazil

  3. 3

    University of Sydney, The George Institute for Global Health, Sydney, NSW, Australia

  4. 4

    VU University Medical Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, Amsterdam, Netherlands

  5. 5

    VU University, Department of Health Sciences, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, Amsterdam, Netherlands

*Raymond WJG Ostelo, Department of Health Sciences, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University, PO Box 7057, Amsterdam, 1007 MB, Netherlands. r.ostelo@vu.nl.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 14 MAR 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Laienverständliche Zusammenfassung

Background

Several rehabilitation programmes are available for individuals after lumbar disc surgery.

Objectives

To determine whether active rehabilitation after lumbar disc surgery is more effective than no treatment, and to describe which type of active rehabilitation is most effective. This is the second update of a Cochrane Review first published in 2002.

First, we clustered treatments according to the start of treatment.
1. Active rehabilitation that starts immediately postsurgery.
2. Active rehabilitation that starts four to six weeks postsurgery.
3. Active rehabilitation that starts longer than 12 months postsurgery.

For every cluster, the following comparisons were investigated.
A. Active rehabilitation versus no treatment, placebo or waiting list control.
B. Active rehabilitation versus other kinds of active rehabilitation.
C. Specific intervention in addition to active rehabilitation versus active rehabilitation alone.

Search methods

We searched CENTRAL (2013, Issue 4) and MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PEDro and PsycINFO to May 2013.

Selection criteria

We included only randomised controlled trials (RCTs).

Data collection and analysis

Pairs of review authors independently assessed studies for eligibility and risk of bias. Meta-analyses were performed if studies were clinically homogeneous. The GRADE approach was used to determine the overall quality of evidence.

Main results

In this update, we identified eight new studies, thereby including a total of 22 trials (2503 participants), 10 of which had a low risk of bias. Most rehabilitation programmes were assessed in only one study. Both men and women were included, and overall mean age was 41.4 years. All participants had received standard discectomy, microdiscectomy and in one study standard laminectomy and (micro)discectomy. Mean duration of the rehabilitation intervention was 12 weeks; eight studies assessed six to eight-week exercise programmes, and eight studies assessed 12 to 13-week exercise programmes. Programmes were provided in primary and secondary care facilities and were started immediately after surgery (n = 4) or four to six weeks (n = 16) or one year after surgery (n = 2). In general, the overall quality of the evidence is low to very low. Rehabilitation programmes that started immediately after surgery were not more effective than their control interventions, which included exercise. Low- to very low-quality evidence suggests that there were no differences between specific rehabilitation programmes (multidisciplinary care, behavioural graded activity, strength and stretching) that started four to six weeks postsurgery and their comparators, which included some form of exercise. Low-quality evidence shows that physiotherapy from four to six weeks postsurgery onward led to better function than no treatment or education only, and that multidisciplinary rehabilitation co-ordinated by medical advisors led to faster return to work than usual care. Statistical pooling was performed only for three comparisons in which the rehabilitation programmes started four to six weeks postsurgery: exercise programmes versus no treatment, high- versus low-intensity exercise programmes and supervised versus home exercise programmes. Very low-quality evidence (five RCTs, N = 272) shows that exercises are more effective than no treatment for pain at short-term follow-up (standard mean difference (SMD) -0.90; 95% confidence interval (CI) -1.55 to -0.24), and low-quality evidence (four RCTs, N = 252) suggests that exercises are more effective for functional status on short-term follow-up (SMD -0.67; 95% CI -1.22 to -0.12) and that no difference in functional status was noted on long-term follow-up (three RCTs, N = 226; SMD -0.22; 95% CI -0.49 to 0.04). None of these studies reported that exercise increased the reoperation rate. Very low-quality evidence (two RCTs, N = 103) shows that high-intensity exercise programmes are more effective than low-intensity exercise programmes for pain in the short term (weighted mean difference (WMD) -10.67; 95% CI -17.04 to -4.30), and low-quality evidence (two RCTs, N = 103) shows that they are more effective for functional status in the short term (SMD -0.77; 95% CI -1.17 to -0.36). Very low-quality evidence (four RCTs, N = 154) suggests no significant differences between supervised and home exercise programmes for short-term pain relief (SMD -0.76;  95% CI -2.04 to 0.53) or functional status (four RCTs, N = 154; SMD -0.36; 95% CI -0.88 to 0.15).

Authors' conclusions

Considerable variation was noted in the content, duration and intensity of the rehabilitation programmes included in this review, and for none of them was high- or moderate-quality evidence identified. Exercise programmes starting four to six weeks postsurgery seem to lead to a faster decrease in pain and disability than no treatment, with small to medium effect sizes, and high-intensity exercise programmes seem to lead to a slightly faster decrease in pain and disability than is seen with low-intensity programmes, but the overall quality of the evidence is only low to very low. No significant differences were noted between supervised and home exercise programmes for pain relief, disability or global perceived effect. None of the trials reported an increase in reoperation rate after first-time lumbar surgery. High-quality randomised controlled trials are strongly needed.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Laienverständliche Zusammenfassung

Rehabilitation after surgery for herniation of the lumbar disc

Review question

We reviewed the evidence on the effects of rehabilitation programmes on pain, recovery, function and return to work in people who have had lumbar disc surgery.

Background

A 'slipped' or 'herniated' disc is thought to be the most common cause of leg pain associated with a 'pinched' or compressed nerve in the lower back. Many patients are treated with a combination of non-surgical measures such as medication or physiotherapy. Patients with persistent symptoms may undergo surgery. Although 78% to 95% of patients will improve after surgery, some will continue to have symptoms. It is estimated that 3% to 12% of patients who have disc surgery will have recurrent symptoms, and most of these patients will have surgery again. 

Rehabilitation  programmes, such as exercise therapy by a physiotherapist and advice to return to normal activities like returning to work, are common approaches after surgery.

Study characteristics

This updated review evaluated the effectiveness of various rehabilitation programmes for patients who had lumbar disc surgery for the first time. We included 22 randomised controlled trials with 2503 participants, both men and women, between the ages of 18 and 65 years. The evidence is current to May 2013. Most commonly, treatment started four to six weeks after surgery, but the start of treatment ranged from two hours to 12 months after surgery. Considerable variation in the content, duration and intensity of treatments (i.e. exercise programmes) has been noted. The duration of the interventions varied from two weeks to one year; most programmes lasted six to 12 weeks. Participants reported on average serious pain intensity (56 points on a zero to 100 scale, with 100 being the worst possible pain). Most studies compared (1) exercise versus no treatment, (2) high-intensity exercise versus low-intensity exercise or (3) supervised exercise versus home exercise, most commonly starting four to six weeks after surgery. Comparisons in this review included (1) exercise versus no treatment, (2) high-intensity versus low-intensity exercise and (3) supervised versus home exercise.

Key results

Patients who participated in exercise programmes four to six weeks after surgery reported slightly less short-term pain and disability than those who received no treatment. Patients who participated in high-intensity exercise programmes reported slightly less short-term pain and disability than those participating in low-intensity exercise programmes. Patients in supervised exercise programmes reported little or no difference in pain and disability compared with those in home exercise programmes. Here it was difficult to draw firm conclusions in the absence of high-quality evidence.

None of the trials reported an increase in reoperation rate after first-time lumbar surgery.

The evidence does not show whether all patients should be treated after surgery or only those who still have symptoms four to six weeks later.

Quality of the evidence

Limitations in the methods of half of the trials suggest that the results should be read with caution. Most of the treatments were assessed in only one trial. Therefore for most of the interventions, only low- to very low-quality evidence indicates that no firm conclusions can be drawn regarding their effectiveness.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Laienverständliche Zusammenfassung

Rééducation après la chirurgie discale lombaire

Contexte

Plusieurs programmes de rééducation existent pour les personnes ayant fait l'objet d'une chirurgie discale lombaire.

Objectifs

Déterminer si la rééducation active après la chirurgie discale lombaire est plus efficace que l'absence de traitement, et décrire quel type de rééducation active est le plus efficace. Ceci est la deuxième mise à jour d'une revue Cochrane publiée pour la première fois en 2002.

Premièrement, nous avons regroupé les traitements selon le début du traitement.
1. Rééducation active débutant immédiatement après l'intervention chirurgicale.
2. Rééducation active débutant quatre à six semaines après l'intervention chirurgicale.
3. Rééducation active débutant plus de 12 mois après l'intervention chirurgicale.

Pour chaque regroupement, les comparaisons suivantes ont été étudiées.
A. Rééducation active versus absence de traitement, placebo ou témoins sur liste d'attente.
B. Rééducation active versus d'autres types de rééducation active.
C. Intervention spécifique en plus de la rééducation active versus rééducation active seule.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans CENTRAL (2013, numéro 4) et MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PEDro et PsycINFO jusqu'à mai 2013.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus uniquement des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR).

Recueil et analyse des données

En binômes, les auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment évalué l'éligibilité et le risque de biais des études. Des méta-analyses ont été effectuées lorsque les études étaient cliniquement homogènes. L'approche GRADE a été utilisée pour déterminer la qualité globale des preuves.

Résultats Principaux

Dans cette mise à jour, nous avons identifié huit nouvelles études, incluant ainsi un total de 22 essais (2 503 participants), dont 10 présentaient un faible risque de biais. La plupart des programmes de rééducation ont été évalués dans une seule étude. Des hommes et des femmes étaient inclus, et dans l'ensemble âge moyen était de 41,4 ans. Tous les participants avaient été opérés par discectomie standard, microdiscectomie et, dans une étude, laminectomie standard et (micro)discectomie. La durée moyenne de l'intervention de rééducation était de 12 semaines ; huit études ont évalué des programmes d'exercice de six à huit semaines et huit autres des programmes d'exercice de 12 à 13 semaines. Les programmes étaient conduits dans des établissements de soins primaires et secondaires et débutaient soit immédiatement après la chirurgie (n = 4), soit quatre à six semaines (n = 16) ou un an après la chirurgie (n = 2). En général, la qualité globale des preuves est faible à très faible. Les programmes de rééducation commençant immédiatement après la chirurgie n'étaient pas plus efficaces que leurs interventions de contrôle, qui incluaient de l'exercice. Des preuves de qualité faible à très faible suggèrent qu'il n'y avait aucune différence entre les programmes de rééducation spécifiques (prise en charge multidisciplinaire, activité progressive comportementale, force et étirements) débutant quatre à six semaines après l'intervention chirurgicale et leurs comparateurs, qui incluaient de l'exercice sous une forme ou une autre. Des preuves de qualité faible montrent que la kinésithérapie à partir de quatre à six semaines après l'intervention chirurgicale conduisait à une meilleure fonction que l'absence de traitement ou l'éducation seule, et que la rééducation multidisciplinaire coordonnée par des conseillers médicaux conduisait à une reprise du travail plus rapide que les soins habituels. Un regroupement statistique n'a été effectué que pour trois comparaisons dans lesquelles les programmes de réadaptation avaient débuté quatre à six semaines après l'intervention chirurgicale : programmes d'exercice versus absence de traitement, programmes d'exercice intense versus de faible intensité et programmes d'exercice supervisé versus à domicile. Des preuves de très faible qualité (cinq ECR, N = 272) montrent que les exercices sont plus efficaces que l'absence de traitement pour la douleur lors du suivi à court terme (différence moyenne standardisée (DMS) -0,90 ; intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % -1,55 à -0,24), et des preuves de qualité faible (quatre ECR, N = 252) suggèrent que les exercices sont plus efficaces pour le statut fonctionnel au suivi à court terme (DMS -0,67 ; IC à 95 % -1,22 à -0,12) et qu'aucune différence en termes de statut fonctionnel n'était observée au suivi à long terme (trois ECR, N = 226 ; DMS -0,22 ; IC à 95 % -0,49 à 0,04). Aucune de ces études n'a rapporté que l'exercice augmentait le taux de réopération. Des preuves de très faible qualité (deux ECR, N = 103) montrent que les programmes d'exercice intense sont plus efficaces que les programmes de faible intensité pour la douleur à court terme (différence moyenne pondérée (DMP) -10,67 ; IC à 95 % -17,04 à -4,30), et des preuves de qualité faible (deux ECR, N = 103) montrent qu'ils sont plus efficaces pour le statut fonctionnel à court terme (DMS -0,77 ; IC à 95 % -1,17 à -0,36). Des preuves de très faible qualité (quatre ECR, N = 154) suggèrent qu'il n'y a aucune différence significative entre les programmes d'exercice supervisé ou à domicile pour le soulagement de la douleur à court terme (DMS -0,76 ; IC à 95 % -2,04 à 0,53) ou le statut fonctionnel (quatre ECR, N = 154 ; DMS -0,36 ; IC à 95 % -0,88 à 0,15).

Conclusions des auteurs

Une variation considérable était observée dans le contenu, la durée et l'intensité des programmes de rééducation inclus dans cette revue, et des preuves de qualité élevée ou modérée n'ont été identifiées pour aucun d'entre eux. Les programmes d'exercice débutant quatre à six semaines après l'intervention chirurgicale semblent conduire à une diminution plus rapide de la douleur et de l'incapacité que l'absence de traitement, avec des ampleurs de l'effet faibles et moyennes, et les programmes d'exercice intense semblent conduire à une diminution légèrement plus rapide de la douleur et de l'incapacité que celle constatée avec les programmes de faible intensité, mais la qualité globale des preuves est seulement faible à très faible. Aucune différence significative n'a été observée entre les programmes d'exercice supervisé et à domicile pour le soulagement de la douleur, l'incapacité ou l'effet global perçu. Aucun des essais n'a rapporté une augmentation du taux de réopération après une première intervention de chirurgie lombaire. Il y a un fort besoin d'essais contrôlés randomisés de haute qualité.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Laienverständliche Zusammenfassung

Rééducation après la chirurgie discale lombaire

La rééducation après la chirurgie pour le traitement de la hernie discale lombaire

Question de la revue

Nous avons examiné les preuves sur les effets des programmes de rééducation sur la douleur, la récupération, la fonction et le retour au travail chez les personnes ayant subi une chirurgie discale lombaire.

Contexte

Une « hernie » ou la saillie d'un disque intervertébral serait la cause la plus courante d'une douleur de la jambe associée à un nerf « pincé » ou comprimé dans le bas du dos. Beaucoup de patients sont traités avec une combinaison de mesures non chirurgicales comme les médicaments ou la kinésithérapie. Les patients présentant des symptômes persistants peuvent subir une intervention chirurgicale. Bien que 78 % 95 % des patients se porteront mieux après l'opération, certains continueront à souffrir de symptômes. On estime que 3 % à 12 % des patients qui subissent une chirurgie discale auront des symptômes récurrents, et la plupart de ceux-là subiront une nouvelle opération.

Les programmes de rééducation, tels que les exercices de kinésithérapie et les conseils sur la reprise des activités normales, telles que le retour au travail, sont des approches courantes après la chirurgie.

Caractéristiques des études

Cette revue mise à jour a évalué l'efficacité de différents programmes de rééducation pour les patients ayant subi une chirurgie discale lombaire pour la première fois. Nous avons inclus 22 essais contrôlés randomisés totalisant 2 503 participants, des hommes et des femmes entre 18 et 65 ans. Les preuves sont à jour en mai 2013. Le plus souvent, le traitement avait débuté quatre à six semaines après l'opération, mais le début du traitement allait de deux heures à 12 mois après la chirurgie. Des variations considérables ont été observées dans le contenu, la durée et l'intensité des traitements (par ex. des programmes d'exercices). La durée des interventions variait de deux semaines à un an ; la plupart des programmes ont duré six à 12 semaines. Les participants rapportaient en moyenne une douleur d'intensité grave (56 points sur une échelle de zéro à cent, 100 étant la pire douleur possible). La plupart des études comparaient (1) l'exercice physique à l'absence de traitement, (2) l'exercice intense à l'exercice de faible intensité ou (3) l'exercice supervisé à l'exercice à domicile, débutant le plus souvent quatre à six semaines après la chirurgie. Les comparaisons dans cette revue portaient sur (1) l'exercice physique par rapport à l'absence de traitement, (2) l'exercice intense par rapport à l'exercice de faible intensité et (3) l'exercice supervisé par rapport à l'exercice à domicile.

Résultats principaux

Les patients ayant participé à des programmes d'exercices quatre à six semaines après la chirurgie rapportaient légèrement moins de douleurs et d'incapacité à court terme que ceux n'ayant reçu aucun traitement. Les patients ayant participé à des programmes d'exercice intense rapportaient légèrement moins de douleurs et d'incapacité à court terme que les patients participant à des programmes d'exercice de faible intensité. Les patients dans des programmes d'exercice supervisé rapportaient peu ou aucune différence dans la douleur et l'incapacité par rapport aux patients dans des programmes d'exercice à domicile. Sur ce point, il était difficile de tirer des conclusions définitives en l'absence de preuves de qualité élevée.

Aucun des essais n'a rapporté d'augmentation du taux de réopération après une première intervention de chirurgie lombaire.

Les preuves ne permettent pas de dire si tous les patients devraient recevoir un traitement après l'opération ou seulement ceux chez qui des symptômes persistent quatre à six semaines plus tard.

Qualité des preuves

Les limitations méthodologiques constatées dans la moitié des essais suggèrent que les résultats doivent être lus avec prudence. La plupart des traitements n'ont été évalués que dans un seul essai. Par conséquent, pour la plupart des interventions, seules des preuves de qualité faible à très faible indiquent qu'aucune conclusion définitive ne peut être formulée concernant leur efficacité.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 3rd July, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé

 

Laienverständliche Zusammenfassung

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Laienverständliche Zusammenfassung

Rehabilitation nach lumbalen Bandscheibenoperationen

Rehabilitation nach Bandscheibenoperationen an der Lendenwirbelsäule

Review-Frage

Wir haben die Evidenz (den wissenschaftlichen Beleg) für die Wirksamkeit von Rehabilitationsprogrammen in Bezug auf Schmerzen, Genesung, Funktionsfähigkeit und Rückkehr an den Arbeitsplatz nach Bandscheiben-Operationen an der Lendenwirbelsäule überprüft.

Hintergrund

Eine „herausgerutschte“ oder „vorgefallene“ Bandscheibe (ein Bandscheibenvorfall) gilt als die häufigste Ursache von Beinschmerzen in Zusammenhang mit einem „eingeklemmten“ oder eingeengten Nerv im unteren Rücken. Viele Patienten werden mit einer Kombination von nicht-operativen Maßnahmen wie Medikamenten oder Physiotherapie behandelt. Patienten mit anhaltenden Beschwerden werden gegebenenfalls operiert. Während es 78% bis 95% der Patienten nach der Operation besser geht, haben einige weiterhin Beschwerden. Schätzungsweise 3% bis 12% der Patienten, die an der Bandscheibe operiert werden, haben wiederkehrende Beschwerden, und die meisten dieser Patienten werden erneut operiert.

Rehabilitationsprogramme, beispielsweise eine Übungstherapie bei einem Physiotherapeuten und die Empfehlung zur Wiederaufnahme von Alltagsaktivitäten wie die Rückkehr an den Arbeitsplatz, sind übliche Vorgehensweisen nach der Operation.

Studienmerkmale

Diese aktualisierte Übersichtsarbeit hat die Wirksamkeit verschiedener Rehabilitationsprogramme für Patienten untersucht, die das erste Mal an einem Bandscheibenvorfall an der Lendenwirbelsäule operiert wurden. Wir haben 22 randomisierte kontrollierte Studien (Vergleichsstudien) mit 2.503 Patienten – Männer und Frauen, im Alter zwischen 18 und 65 Jahren – eingeschlossen. Die Evidenz ist auf dem Stand von Mai 2013. In den meisten Fällen wurde mit der Behandlung vier bis sechs Wochen nach der Operation begonnen, jedoch variierte der Behandlungsbeginn zwischen zwei Stunden und 12 Monaten nach der Operation. Es bestanden erhebliche Unterschiede in den Inhalten, der Dauer und der Intensität der Behandlungen (d.h. der Übungsprogramme). Die Dauer der Behandlungen variierte von zwei Wochen bis zu einem Jahr; die meisten Programme dauerten sechs bis 12 Wochen. Die Teilnehmer gaben im Durchschnitt beträchtliche Schmerzen an (56 Punkte auf einer Skala von 0 bis 100, mit 100 als stärkstem möglichem Schmerz). Die meisten Studien verglichen (1) Übungen mit keiner Behandlung, (2) Übungen hoher Intensität mit Übungen niedriger Intensität oder (3) angeleitete Übungen mit Heimübungen, mit Beginn meist vier bis sechs Wochen nach der Operation. Die Vergleiche in dieser Übersichtsarbeit schlossen (1) Übungen mit keiner Behandlung, (2) Übungen hoher Intensität mit Übungen niedriger Intensität und (3) angeleitete Übungen mit Heimübungen ein.

Hauptergebnisse

Patienten, die vier bis sechs Wochen nach der Operation an Übungsprogrammen teilnahmen, berichteten von etwas weniger kurzfristigen Schmerzen und Aktivitätseinschränkungen als jene, die keine Behandlung erhielten. Patienten, die an Programmen mit hoher Intensität teilnahmen, berichteten über kurzfristig etwas weniger Schmerzen und Aktivitätseinschränkungen als jene, die an Programmen mit niedriger Intensität teilnahmen. Patienten in angeleiteten Übungsprogrammen berichteten über wenig oder keinen Unterschied bezüglich Schmerzen und Aktivitätseinschränkungen im Vergleich mit jenen in Heimübungsprogrammen. Hier war es schwierig, gesicherte Schlussfolgerungen abzuleiten, da keine qualitativ hochwertige Evidenz vorlag.

Keine der Studien berichtete über eine Zunahme der Häufigkeit von erneuten Operationen nach der ersten Operation an der Lendenwirbelsäule.

Die Evidenz zeigt nicht auf, ob alle Patienten nach der Operation behandelt werden sollten oder nur jene, die vier bis sechs Wochen später immer noch Beschwerden haben.

Qualität der Evidenz

Aufgrund von Einschränkungen in der methodischen Vorgehensweise bei der Hälfte der Studien sollten die Ergebnisse mit Vorsicht betrachtet werden. Die meisten Behandlungen wurden nur durch jeweils eine Studie untersucht. Daher deutet eine für die meisten der Behandlungsprogramme qualitativ nur geringe bis sehr geringe Evidenz darauf hin, dass keine gesicherten Schlussfolgerungen zu ihrer Wirksamkeit abgeleitet werden können.

Anmerkungen zur Übersetzung

translated by: C. Braun & T. Bossmann