Intervention Review

Interventions for providers to promote a patient-centred approach in clinical consultations

  1. Francesca Dwamena1,
  2. Margaret Holmes-Rovner2,*,
  3. Carolyn M Gaulden1,
  4. Sarah Jorgenson3,
  5. Gelareh Sadigh4,
  6. Alla Sikorskii5,
  7. Simon Lewin6,7,
  8. Robert C Smith1,
  9. John Coffey8,
  10. Adesuwa Olomu1,
  11. Michael Beasley9

Editorial Group: Cochrane Consumers and Communication Group

Published Online: 12 DEC 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 1 DEC 2010

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003267.pub2


How to Cite

Dwamena F, Holmes-Rovner M, Gaulden CM, Jorgenson S, Sadigh G, Sikorskii A, Lewin S, Smith RC, Coffey J, Olomu A, Beasley M. Interventions for providers to promote a patient-centred approach in clinical consultations. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 12. Art. No.: CD003267. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003267.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, Department of Medicine, East Lansing, Michigan, USA

  2. 2

    Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences, East Lansing, Michigan, USA

  3. 3

    Michigan State University, Department of Bioethics, Humanities and Society, East Lansing, MI, USA

  4. 4

    University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan, USA

  5. 5

    Michigan State University, Department of Statistics and Probability, East Lansing, Michigan, USA

  6. 6

    Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services, Global Health Unit, Oslo, Norway

  7. 7

    Medical Research Council of South Africa, Health Systems Research Unit, Tygerberg, South Africa

  8. 8

    Michigan State University, Main Library, East Lansing, Michigan, USA

  9. 9

    East Lansing, Michigan, USA

*Margaret Holmes-Rovner, Center for Ethics and Humanities in the Life Sciences, Michigan State University College of Human Medicine, East Fee Road, 956 Fee Road Rm C203, East Lansing, Michigan, 48824-1316, USA. mholmes@msu.edu.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 12 DEC 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Communication problems in health care may arise as a result of healthcare providers focusing on diseases and their management, rather than people, their lives and their health problems. Patient-centred approaches to care delivery in the patient encounter are increasingly advocated by consumers and clinicians and incorporated into training for healthcare providers. However, the impact of these interventions directly on clinical encounters and indirectly on patient satisfaction, healthcare behaviour and health status has not been adequately evaluated.

Objectives

To assess the effects of interventions for healthcare providers that aim to promote patient-centred care (PCC) approaches in clinical consultations.

Search methods

For this update, we searched: MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), PsycINFO (OvidSP), and CINAHL (EbscoHOST) from January 2000 to June 2010. The earlier version of this review searched MEDLINE (1966 to December 1999), EMBASE (1985 to December 1999), PsycLIT (1987 to December 1999), CINAHL (1982 to December 1999) and HEALTH STAR (1975 to December 1999). We searched the bibliographies of studies assessed for inclusion and contacted study authors to identify other relevant studies. Any study authors who were contacted for further information on their studies were also asked if they were aware of any other published or ongoing studies that would meet our inclusion criteria.

Selection criteria

In the original review, study designs included randomized controlled trials, controlled clinical trials, controlled before and after studies, and interrupted time series studies of interventions for healthcare providers that promote patient-centred care in clinical consultations. In the present update, we were able to limit the studies to randomized controlled trials, thus limiting the likelihood of sampling error. This is especially important because the providers who volunteer for studies of PCC methods are likely to be different from the general population of providers. Patient-centred care was defined as a philosophy of care that encourages: (a) shared control of the consultation, decisions about interventions or management of the health problems with the patient, and/or (b) a focus in the consultation on the patient as a whole person who has individual preferences situated within social contexts (in contrast to a focus in the consultation on a body part or disease). Within our definition, shared treatment decision-making was a sufficient indicator of PCC. The participants were healthcare providers, including those in training.

Data collection and analysis

We classified interventions by whether they focused only on training providers or on training providers and patients, with and without condition-specific educational materials. We grouped outcome data from the studies to evaluate both direct effects on patient encounters (consultation process variables) and effects on patient outcomes (satisfaction, healthcare behaviour change, health status). We pooled results of RCTs using standardized mean difference (SMD) and relative risks (RR) applying a fixed-effect model.

Main results

Forty-three randomized trials met the inclusion criteria, of which 29 are new in this update. In most of the studies, training interventions were directed at primary care physicians (general practitioners, internists, paediatricians or family doctors) or nurses practising in community or hospital outpatient settings. Some studies trained specialists. Patients were predominantly adults with general medical problems, though two studies included children with asthma. Descriptive and pooled analyses showed generally positive effects on consultation processes on a range of measures relating to clarifying patients' concerns and beliefs; communicating about treatment options; levels of empathy; and patients' perception of providers' attentiveness to them and their concerns as well as their diseases. A new finding for this update is that short-term training (less than 10 hours) is as successful as longer training.

The analyses showed mixed results on satisfaction, behaviour and health status. Studies using complex interventions that focused on providers and patients with condition-specific materials generally showed benefit in health behaviour and satisfaction, as well as consultation processes, with mixed effects on health status. Pooled analysis of the fewer than half of included studies with adequate data suggests moderate beneficial effects from interventions on the consultation process; and mixed effects on behaviour and patient satisfaction, with small positive effects on health status. Risk of bias varied across studies. Studies that focused only on provider behaviour frequently did not collect data on patient outcomes, limiting the conclusions that can be drawn about the relative effect of intervention focus on providers compared with providers and patients.

Authors' conclusions

Interventions to promote patient-centred care within clinical consultations are effective across studies in transferring patient-centred skills to providers. However the effects on patient satisfaction, health behaviour and health status are mixed. There is some indication that complex interventions directed at providers and patients that include condition-specific educational materials have beneficial effects on health behaviour and health status, outcomes not assessed in studies reviewed previously. The latter conclusion is tentative at this time and requires more data. The heterogeneity of outcomes, and the use of single item consultation and health behaviour measures limit the strength of the conclusions.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Training healthcare providers to be more 'patient-centred' in clinical consultations

Problems may arise when healthcare providers focus on managing diseases rather than on people and their health problems. Patient-centred approaches to care delivery in the patient encounter are increasingly advocated by consumers and clinicians and incorporated into training for healthcare providers. We updated a 2001 systematic review of the effects of these training interventions for healthcare providers that aim to promote patient-centred care in clinical consultations.

We found 29 new randomized trials (up to June 2010), bringing the total of studies included in the review to 43. In most of the studies, training interventions were directed at primary care physicians (general practitioners, internists, paediatricians or family doctors) or nurses practising in community or hospital outpatient settings. Some studies trained specialists. Patients were predominantly adults with general medical problems, though two studies included children with asthma.

These studies showed that training providers to improve their ability to share control with patients about topics and decisions addressed in consultations are largely successful in teaching providers new skills. Short-term training (less than 10 hours) is as successful in this regard as longer training. Results are mixed about whether patients are more satisfied when providers practice these skills. The impact on general health is also mixed, although the limited data that could be pooled showed small positive effects on health status. Patients' specific health behaviours show improvement in the small number of studies where interventions use provider training combined with condition-specific educational materials and/or training for patients, such as teaching question-asking during the consultation or medication-taking after the consultation. However, the number of studies is too small to determine which elements of these multi-faceted studies are essential in helping patients change their healthcare behaviours.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions pour la promotion chez les prestataires d'une approche centrée sur le patient dans les consultations cliniques

Contexte

Des problèmes de communication peuvent surgir dans le domaine médical du fait que les prestataires de soins se concentrent sur les maladies et leur prise en charge, plutôt que sur les personnes, leur vie et leurs problèmes de santé. Consommateurs et cliniciens prônent de plus en plus une approche médicale centrée sur le patient et cela est intégré de manière croissante dans la formation des prestataires de soins. Toutefois, l'impact direct de ces interventions sur les rencontres cliniques et leur impact indirect sur la satisfaction des patients, leur comportement en matière médicale et leur état de santé n'ont pas été suffisamment évalués.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets des interventions pour prestataires de soins qui visent à promouvoir les approches de soin centrées sur le patient (SCP) dans les consultations cliniques.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Pour cette mise à jour, nous avons effectué une recherche dans : MEDLINE (OvidSP), EMBASE (OvidSP), PsycINFO (OvidSP) et CINAHL (EbscoHOST) de janvier 2000 à juin 2010. La version antérieure de cette revue avait recherché dans MEDLINE (de ​​1966 à décembre 1999), EMBASE (de 1985 à décembre 1999), PsycLIT (de 1987 à décembre 1999), CINAHL (de 1982 à décembre 1999) et HEALTH STAR (de 1975 à décembre 1999). Nous avons passé au crible les bibliographies des études évaluées pour inclusion et contacté des auteurs d'études afin d'identifier d'autres études pertinentes. Nous avons également demandé à tous les auteurs contactés pour de plus amples informations sur leurs propres études s'ils avaient connaissance d'autres études publiées ou en cours qui pourraient remplir nos critères d'inclusion.

Critères de sélection

Dans la revue originale, les études incluses étaient des essais contrôlés randomisés, des essais cliniques contrôlés, des études contrôlées avant-après et des études de séries temporelles interrompues portant sur des interventions pour prestataires de soins destinées à promouvoir les soins axés sur le patient dans les consultations cliniques. Dans la présente mise à jour, nous avons pu limiter les études aux essais contrôlés randomisés, limitant ainsi les risques d'erreur d'échantillonnage. Ceci est particulièrement important parce que les prestataires qui se portent volontaires pour des études sur les méthodes de SCP sont probablement différents de la population générale des prestataires. Les soins centrés sur le patient sont définis comme une philosophie de soin qui encourage : (a) le contrôle partagé avec le patient de la consultation et des décisions concernant les interventions ou la gestion des problèmes de santé, et/ou (b) le centrage de la consultation sur le patient comme une personne à part entière qui a des préférences personnelles liées à un contexte social (à l'opposé d'une consultation axée sur une partie du corps ou une maladie). Dans le cadre de notre définition, le prise en commun de la décision de traitement est un indicateur suffisant de SCP. Les participants étaient des prestataires de soins de santé, y compris en formation.

Recueil et analyse des données

Nous avons classé les interventions selon qu'elles ne portaient que sur la formation des prestataires ou qu'elles incluaient aussi la formation des patients, avec ou sans matériel éducatif relatif à des affections spécifiques. Nous avons regroupé les données de résultat des études afin d'évaluer les effets directs sur les rencontres avec les patients (variables du processus de consultation) ainsi que les effets sur les patients (satisfaction, modification du comportement en matière médicale, état ​​de santé). Nous avons combiné les résultats des ECR utilisant les différences moyennes standardisées (DMS) et les risques relatifs (RR), par le biais d'un modèle à effet fixe.

Résultats Principaux

Quarante-trois essais randomisés remplissaient les critères d'inclusion, dont 29 ont été nouvellement ajoutés dans cette mise à jour. Dans la plupart des études, les interventions de formation s'adressaient aux médecins de soins primaires (médecins généralistes, internistes, pédiatres ou médecins de famille) ou aux infirmières qui exercent dans la communauté ou dans un dispensaire hospitalier. Certaines études avaient formé des spécialistes. Les patients étaient principalement des adultes souffrant de problèmes médicaux généraux, bien que deux études incluent des enfants asthmatiques. Les analyses descriptives et regroupées ont généralement mis en évidence des effets positifs sur le processus de consultation à travers toute une série de mesures relatives aux efforts de comprendre les préoccupations et les croyances des patients, à la communication sur les options de traitement, aux niveaux d'empathie et à la perception par les patients de l'attention que les prestataires prêtent, au-delà de leurs maladies, à leur personne et à leurs préoccupations. Cette mise à jour a révélé qu'une formation de courte durée (moins de 10 heures) réussit aussi bien qu'une formation plus longue.

Les analyses ont produit des résultats mitigés sur la satisfaction, le comportement et l'état de santé. Les études portant sur des interventions complexes s'adressant aux prestataires et aux patients avec du matériel relatif à des affections spécifiques montraient généralement un bénéfice au niveau du comportement médical et de la satisfaction, ainsi que des processus de consultation, avec des effets mitigés sur l'état de santé. L'analyse regroupée de la petite moitié des études incluses ayant des données adéquates laisse entrevoir des effets bénéfiques modérés des interventions sur le processus de consultation, ainsi que des effets mitigés sur le comportement et la satisfaction des patients, avec de légers effets positifs sur l'état de santé. Le risque de biais variait selon les études. Les études qui ne portaient que sur le comportement des prestataires n'avaient souvent pas recueilli de données sur des critères de résultat relatifs aux patients, ce qui limite les conclusions qui peuvent être tirées quant à l'effet relatif des interventions s'adressant aux prestataires et aux patients par rapport à celles ne s'adressant qu'aux prestataires.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les interventions visant à promouvoir le centrage sur le patient dans les consultations cliniques sont efficaces dans toutes les études quant à leur effet sur les prestataires de soins. Cependant, les effets sur la satisfaction du patient, son comportement en matière de santé et son état de santé sont mitigés. Il y a quelques indications que les interventions complexes s'adressant aux prestataires et aux patients et incluant du matériel éducatif relatif à des affections spécifiques, ont des effets bénéfiques sur le comportement en matière de santé et l'état de santé, deux critères de résultat non évalués dans les études passées en revue précédemment. Cette dernière conclusion est provisoire et nécessite plus de données. L'hétérogénéité des résultats, et l'utilisation de mesures uniques relatives à la consultation et au comportement en matière de santé limitent la puissance des conclusions.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Interventions pour la promotion chez les prestataires d'une approche centrée sur le patient dans les consultations cliniques

Éducation des prestataires de soins à être plus 'centrés sur le patient' dans les consultations cliniques

Des problèmes peuvent survenir lorsque les prestataires de soins se concentrent sur la prise en charge des maladies plutôt que sur les personnes et leurs problèmes de santé. Consommateurs et cliniciens prônent de plus en plus une approche médicale centrée sur le patient et cela est intégré de manière croissante dans la formation des prestataires de soins. Nous avons mis à jour une revue systématique de 2001 sur les effets de ces interventions de formation pour prestataires de soins de santé, visant à promouvoir les soins centrés sur le patient dans les consultations cliniques.

Nous avons trouvé 29 nouveaux essais randomisés (jusqu'à juin 2010), portant le total des études incluses dans la revue à 43. Dans la plupart des études, les interventions de formation s'adressaient aux médecins de soins primaires (médecins généralistes, internistes, pédiatres ou médecins de famille) ou aux infirmières qui exercent dans la communauté ou dans un dispensaire hospitalier. Certaines études avaient formé des spécialistes. Les patients étaient principalement des adultes souffrant de problèmes médicaux généraux, bien que deux études incluent des enfants asthmatiques.

Ces études ont montré que la formation des prestataires à améliorer leur capacité à partager avec les patients le contrôle des sujets abordés et des décisions prises lors des consultations parvient dans la plupart des cas à inculquer de nouvelles compétences aux prestataires. La formation de courte durée (moins de 10 heures) réussit aussi bien à cet égard qu'une formation plus longue. Les résultats sont mitigés quant à savoir si les patients sont plus satisfaits lorsque les prestataires mettent ces compétences en pratique. L'impact sur ​​la santé générale est également mitigé, bien que les données limitées qui ont pu être regroupées aient montré de légers effets positifs sur l'état de santé. Une amélioration des comportements en matière de santé des patients a été constatée dans le petit nombre d'études où les interventions combinaient la formation des prestataires et du matériel éducatif relatif aux affections et/ou la formation des patients, comme l'éducation à poser des questions au cours de la consultation ou à prendre les médicaments après la consultation. Toutefois, le nombre d'études est trop petit pour déterminer quels éléments de ces études à multiples facettes sont essentiels pour aider les patients à modifier leurs comportements en matière de santé.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 20th December, 2013
Traduction financée par: Minist�re Fran�ais des Affaires sociales et de la Sant�