Intervention Review

Urinary diversion and bladder reconstruction/replacement using intestinal segments for intractable incontinence or following cystectomy

  1. June D Cody2,
  2. Ghulam Nabi1,*,
  3. Norman Dublin3,
  4. Samuel McClinton4,
  5. David E Neal5,
  6. Robert Pickard6,
  7. Sze M Yong7

Editorial Group: Cochrane Incontinence Group

Published Online: 15 FEB 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 7 DEC 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003306.pub2


How to Cite

Cody JD, Nabi G, Dublin N, McClinton S, Neal DE, Pickard R, Yong SM. Urinary diversion and bladder reconstruction/replacement using intestinal segments for intractable incontinence or following cystectomy. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD003306. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003306.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    College of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing, University of Dundee, Centre for Academic Clinical Practice, Clinical and Population Sciences & Education Division, Dundee, Scotland, UK

  2. 2

    University of Aberdeen, Cochrane Incontinence Review Group, Foresterhill, Aberdeen, UK

  3. 3

    University Malaya Medical Centre, Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

  4. 4

    Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, Department of Urology, Ward 44, Aberdeen, UK

  5. 5

    Addenbrooke's Hospital, Cambridge, UK

  6. 6

    Newcastle University, Institute of Cellular Medicine, Newcastle upon Tyne, Tyne and Wear, UK

  7. 7

    Royal Free Hampstead NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Urology, London, UK

*Ghulam Nabi, Centre for Academic Clinical Practice, Clinical and Population Sciences & Education Division, College of Medicine, Dentistry & Nursing, University of Dundee, Dundee, Scotland, DD1 9SY, UK. g.nabi@dundee.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 15 FEB 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Surgery performed to improve or replace the function of the diseased urinary bladder has been carried out for over a century. Main reasons for improving or replacing the function of the urinary bladder are bladder cancer, neurogenic bladder dysfunction, detrusor overactivity and chronic inflammatory diseases of the bladder (such as interstitial cystitis, tuberculosis and schistosomiasis). There is still much uncertainty about the best surgical approach. Options available at the present time include: (1) conduit diversion (the creation of various intestinal conduits to the skin) or continent diversion (which includes either a rectal reservoir or continent cutaneous diversion), (2) bladder reconstruction and (3) replacement of the bladder with various intestinal segments.

Objectives

To determine the best way of improving or replacing the function of the lower urinary tract using intestinal segments when the bladder has to be removed or when it has been rendered useless or dangerous by disease.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Trials Register (searched 28 October 2011), which contains trials identified from the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE and CINAHL, and handsearching of journals and conference proceedings, and the reference lists of relevant articles.

Selection criteria

All randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials of surgery involving transposition of an intestinal segment into the urinary tract.

Data collection and analysis

Trials were evaluated for appropriateness for inclusion and for risk of bias by the review authors. Three review authors were involved in the data extraction. Data were combined in a meta-analysis when appropriate.

Main results

Five trials met the inclusion criteria with a total of 355 participants. These trials addressed only five of the 14 comparisons pre-specified in the protocol. One trial reported no statistically significant differences in the incidence of upper urinary tract infection, uretero-intestinal stenosis and renal deterioration in the comparison of continent diversion with conduit diversion. The confidence intervals were all wide, however, and did not rule out important clinical differences. In a second trial, there was no reported difference in the incidence of upper urinary tract infection and uretero-intestinal stenosis when conduit diversions were fashioned from either ileum or colon. A meta-analysis of two trials showed no statistically significant difference in daytime or nocturnal incontinence amongst participants who were randomised to ileocolonic/ileocaecal segment bladder replacement compared to an ileal bladder replacement. However, one small trial suggested that bladder replacement using an ileal segment compared to using an ileocolonic segment may be better in terms of lower rates of nocturnal incontinence. There were no differences in the incidence of dilatation of upper tract, daytime urinary incontinence or wound infection using different intestinal segments for bladder replacement. However the data were reported for 'renal units', but not in a form that allowed appropriate patient-based paired analyses. No statistically significant difference was found in the incidence of renal scarring between anti-refluxing versus freely refluxing uretero-intestinal anastomotic techniques in conduit diversions and bladder replacement groups. Again, the outcome data were not reported as paired analysis or in form to carry out paired analysis.

Authors' conclusions

The evidence from the included trials was very limited. Only five studies met the inclusion criteria; these were small, of moderate or poor methodological quality, and reported few of the pre-selected outcome measures. This review did not find any evidence that bladder replacement (orthotopic or continent diversion) was better than conduit diversion following cystectomy for cancer. There was no evidence to suggest that bladder reconstruction was better than conduit diversion for benign disease. The clinical significance of data from one small trial suggesting that bladder replacement using an ileal segment compared to using an ileocolonic segment is better in terms of lower rates of nocturnal incontinence is uncertain. The small amount of usable evidence for this review suggests that collaborative multi centre studies should be organised, using random allocation where possible.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Urinary diversion and bladder reconstruction/replacement using intestinal segments for intractable incontinence following bladder surgery

The normal urinary bladder is a hollow muscular organ that lies deep in the pelvis. It functions through the balanced activity of many inter-related nerves and muscles that contain or empty urine as needed. If the bladder has been damaged by disease, surgery can be performed to divert the urine from the bladder (urinary diversion), to reconstruct the bladder or to replace the bladder with intestinal segments. The review did not find enough evidence from trials to show which surgical options are the most effective. One small trial suggested that the ileum bowel segment (small bowel) may be better compared to ileocolonic bowel segment (combination of small and large bowel) for night time incontinence. More research is needed to determine the most effective surgical methods for urinary diversion, reconstruction or replacement of the urinary bladder that has been damaged by disease.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Dérivation urinaire et reconstruction/remplacement de vessie au moyen de segments intestinaux pour le traitement de l'incontinence réfractaire ou après une cystectomie

Contexte

La chirurgie réalisée pour améliorer ou remplacer la fonction de la vessie malade est pratiquée depuis plus d'un siècle. Les principales raisons pour améliorer ou remplacer la fonction de la vessie sont le cancer de la vessie, le dysfonctionnement de la vessie neurogène, une hyperactivité du détrusor et des maladies inflammatoires chroniques de la vessie (telles que la cystite interstitielle, la tuberculose et la schistosomiase). Il existe encore beaucoup d'incertitude concernant la meilleure approche chirurgicale. Les options actuellement disponibles sont : (1) dérivation du conduit (création de différents conduits intestinaux jusqu'à la peau) ou la dérivation urinaire continente (qui comprend soit un réservoir rectal ou une dérivation cutanée continente), (2) la reconstruction de la vessie et (3) le remplacement de la vessie par différents segments intestinaux.

Objectifs

Déterminer la meilleure manière d'améliorer ou remplacer la fonction des voies urinaires inférieures au moyen de segments intestinaux lorsque la vessie a été retirée ou qu'elle a été rendue inutile ou dangereuse par la maladie.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre des essais du groupe Cochrane sur l’incontinence (recherche du 28 octobre 2011), qui contient des essais identifiés issus du registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL), MEDLINE et CINAHL, des recherches manuelles dans les journaux et actes de conférence, ainsi que dans les listes bibliographiques d’articles pertinents.

Critères de sélection

Tous les essais contrôlés randomisés ou quasi-randomisés de chirurgie impliquant une transposition d'un segment intestinal dans l'appareil urinaire.

Recueil et analyse des données

Les essais étaient évalués en termes d'éligibilité à l'inclusion et de risque de biais par les auteurs de la revue. Trois auteurs de la revue participaient à l'extraction des données. Ces dernières ont été combinées dans le cadre d’une méta-analyse, le cas échéant.

Résultats Principaux

Cinq essais répondaient aux critères d’inclusion et totalisaient 355 participants. Ces essais n'abordaient que cinq des 14 comparaisons préalablement spécifiées dans le protocole. Un essai n'indiquait aucune différence statistiquement significative quant à l'incidence de l'infection urinaire haute, de la sténose urétéro-intestinale et de la détérioration de la fonction rénale dans la comparaison de la dérivation continente avec la dérivation du conduit. Les intervalles de confiance étaient, cependant, tous larges et n'excluaient pas d'importantes différences cliniques. Dans un deuxième essai, aucune différence n'était indiquée quant à l'incidence de l'infection urinaire haute et de la sténose urétéro-intestinale lorsque les dérivations de conduit étaient pratiquées à partir de l'iléon ou du côlon. Une méta-analyse de deux essais n'a montré aucune différence statistiquement significative concernant l'incontinence diurne ou nocturne parmi les participants qui étaient randomisés pour recevoir un remplacement de la vessie par segment iléo-colique/iléo-caecal comparé à un remplacement de vessie iléale. Toutefois, un essai à petite échelle suggérait que le remplacement de la vessie au moyen d'un segment iléal comparé à un segment iléo-colique pouvait être plus utile en ce qu'il réduisait davantage le taux d'incontinence nocturne. Aucune différence n'a été observée concernant l'incidence de la dilatation des voies supérieures, de l'incontinence urinaire diurne ou de l'infection des plaies en utilisant différentes sections intestinales pour le remplacement de la vessie. Cependant, les données étaient indiquées pour les « unités de néphrologie », mais pas sous une forme permettant des analyses appariées adéquates ciblant les patients. Aucune différence statistiquement significative n'a été observée concernant l'incidence du marquage rénal entre les techniques anastomotiques urétéro-intestinales antireflux versus à reflux libre dans les groupes de dérivation de conduit et de remplacement de vessie. Là encore, les données de résultat n'étaient pas indiquées sous la forme d'une analyse appariée ou sous une forme permettant de procéder à une analyse appariée.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les preuves issues des essais inclus étaient très limitées. Seules cinq études remplissaient les critères d'inclusion ; ces études étaient à petite échelle, de qualité moyenne ou médiocre, et indiquaient peu de mesures de résultats sur celles pré-sélectionnées. Cette revue n'a trouvé aucune preuve démontrant que le remplacement de la vessie (dérivation orthotopique ou continente) était plus avantageux que la dérivation de conduit après une cystectomie en raison d'un cancer. Il n'a été trouvé aucune preuve suggérant que la reconstruction de la vessie était plus avantageuse que la dérivation de conduit pour les maladies bénignes. La signification clinique des données d'un essai à petite échelle suggérant que le remplacement de la vessie au moyen d'un segment iléal, comparé à un segment iléo-colique, est plus utile en ce qu'il réduit davantage le taux d'incontinence nocturne, est incertaine. La faible quantité de preuves utilisables pour cette revue suggère que des études multicentriques collaboratives soient organisées en utilisant une randomisation lorsque cela est possible.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Dérivation urinaire et reconstruction/remplacement de vessie au moyen de segments intestinaux pour le traitement de l'incontinence réfractaire ou après une cystectomie

Dérivation urinaire et reconstruction/remplacement de vessie au moyen de segments intestinaux pour le traitement de l'incontinence réfractaire après une chirurgie de la vessie

La vessie urinaire normale est un organe musculaire creux qui siège profondément dans le pelvis. Elle fonctionne par l'activité équilibrée de nombreux nerfs et muscles reliés entre eux qui contiennent ou vident l'urine en fonction des besoins. Si la vessie a été endommagée par une maladie, il est possible de pratiquer une chirurgie pour dériver l'urine de la vessie (dérivation urinaire), pour reconstruire la vessie ou remplacer la vessie par des segments intestinaux. La revue n'a pas trouvé suffisamment de preuves dans des essais pour montrer quelles options chirurgicales étaient les plus efficaces. Un essai à petite échelle suggérait que le segment de l'iléon (intestin grêle) pouvait être plus avantageux que le segment iléo-colique (combinaison de l'intestin grêle et du gros intestin) pour l'incontinence nocturne. Des recherches supplémentaires sont nécessaires pour déterminer les méthodes chirurgicales les plus efficaces pour la dérivation urinaire, la reconstruction ou le remplacement de la vessie qui a été endommagée par une maladie.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 18th May, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français