Intervention Review

Male circumcision for prevention of heterosexual acquisition of HIV in men

  1. Nandi Siegfried1,*,
  2. Martie Muller2,
  3. Jonathan J Deeks3,
  4. Jimmy Volmink4,5

Editorial Group: Cochrane HIV/AIDS Group

Published Online: 15 APR 2009

Assessed as up-to-date: 10 SEP 2008

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003362.pub2


How to Cite

Siegfried N, Muller M, Deeks JJ, Volmink J. Male circumcision for prevention of heterosexual acquisition of HIV in men. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2009, Issue 2. Art. No.: CD003362. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003362.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Cape Town, Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, Cape Town, South Africa

  2. 2

    University of Copenhagen, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science, Copenhagen Ø, Denmark

  3. 3

    University of Birmingham, Public Health, Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Birmingham, UK

  4. 4

    Stellenbosch University, Centre for Evidence-based Health Care, Cape Town, South Africa

  5. 5

    South African Medical Research Council, South African Cochrane Centre, Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa

*Nandi Siegfried, Department of Psychiatry and Mental Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. nandi.siegfried@gmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions), comment added to review
  2. Published Online: 15 APR 2009

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Abstract
  7. Plain language summary

Background

Male circumcision is defined as the surgical removal of all or part of the foreskin of the penis and may be practiced as part of a religious ritual, as a medical procedure, or as part of a traditional ritual performed as an initiation into manhood. Since the 1980s, over 30 observational studies have suggested a protective effect of male circumcision on HIV acquisition in heterosexual men. In 2002, three randomised controlled trials to assess the efficacy of male circumcision for preventing HIV acquisition in men commenced in Africa. This review evaluates the results of these trials, which analysed the effectiveness and safety of male circumcision for preventing acquisition of HIV in heterosexual men.

Objectives

To assess the evidence of an interventional effect of male circumcision for preventing acquisition of HIV-1 and HIV-2 by men through heterosexual intercourse

Search methods

We formulated a comprehensive and exhaustive search strategy in an attempt to identify all relevant studies regardless of language or publication status (published, unpublished, in press, and in progress). In June 2007 we searched the following electronic journal and trial databases: MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CENTRAL. We also searched the electronic conference databases NLM Gateway and AIDSearch and the trials registers ClinicalTrials.gov and Current Controlled Trials. We contacted researchers and relevant organizations and checked reference lists of all included studies.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials of male circumcision versus no circumcision in HIV-negative heterosexual men with HIV incidence as the primary outcome.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently assessed study eligibility, extracted data, and graded methodological quality. Data extraction and methodological quality were checked by a third author who resolved differences when these arose. Data were considered clinically homogeneous and meta-analyses and sensitivity analyses were performed.

Main results

Three large RCTs of men from the general population were conducted in South Africa (N = 3 274), Uganda (N = 4 996) and Kenya (N = 2 784) between 2002 and 2006. All three trials were stopped early due to significant findings at interim analyses. We combined the survival estimates for all three trials at 12 months and also at 21 or 24 months in a meta-analysis using available case analyses using the random effects model. The resultant incidence risk ratio (IRR) was 0.50 at 12 months with a 95% confidence interval (CI) of 0.34 to 0.72; and 0.46 at 21 or 24 months (95% CI: 0.34 to 0.62). These IRRs can be interpreted as a relative risk reduction of acquiring HIV of 50% at 12 months and 54% at 21 or 24 months following circumcision. There was little statistical heterogeneity between the trial results (χ² = 0.60; df = 2; p = 0.74 and χ² = 0.31; df = 2; p = 0.86) with the degree of heterogeneity quantified by the I² at 0% in both analyses. We investigated the sensitivity of the calculated IRRs and conducted meta-analyses of the reported IRRs, the reported per protocol IRRs, and reported full intention-to-treat analysis. The results obtained did not differ markedly from the available case meta-analysis, with circumcision displaying significant protective effects across all analyses.

We conducted a meta-analysis of the secondary outcomes measuring sexual behaviour for the Kenyan and Ugandan trials and found no significant differences between circumcised and uncircumcised men. For the South African trial the mean number of sexual contacts at the 12-month visit was 5.9 in the circumcision group versus 5 in the control group, which was a statistically significant difference (p < 0.001). This difference remained statistically significant at the 21-month visit (7.5 versus 6.4; p = 0.0015). No other significant differences were observed.

Incidence of adverse events following the surgical circumcision procedure was low in all three trials.

Reporting of methodological quality was variable across the three trials, but overall, the potential for significant biases affecting the trial results was judged to be low to moderate given the large sample sizes of the trials, the balance of possible confounding variables across randomised groups at baseline in all three trials, and the employment of acceptable statistical early stopping rules.

Authors' conclusions

There is strong evidence that medical male circumcision reduces the acquisition of HIV by heterosexual men by between 38% and 66% over 24 months. Incidence of adverse events is very low, indicating that male circumcision, when conducted under these conditions, is a safe procedure. Inclusion of male circumcision into current HIV prevention measures guidelines is warranted, with further research required to assess the feasibility, desirability, and cost-effectiveness of implementing the procedure within local contexts.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Abstract
  7. Plain language summary

Male circumcision for prevention of heterosexual acquisition of HIV in men

Results from three large randomised controlled trials conducted in Africa have shown strong evidence that male circumcision prevents men in the general population from acquiring HIV from heterosexual sex. At a local level, further research will be needed to assess whether implementing the intervention is feasible, appropriate, and cost-effective in different settings.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Abstract
  7. Plain language summary

La circoncision pour la prévention de l'acquisition hétérosexuelle du VIH chez les hommes

Contexte

La circoncision est définie comme l'ablation chirurgicale d'une partie ou de la totalité du prépuce sur le pénis et peut être pratiquée en tant que rituel religieux, procédure médicale, ou en tant que rituel traditionnel réalisé sous forme d'initiation permettant le passage à l'âge adulte. Depuis les années 1980, plus de 30 études observationnelles ont suggéré que la circoncision avait un effet de protection face à l'acquisition du VIH chez les hommes hétérosexuels. En 2002, trois essais contrôlés randomisés visant à évaluer l'efficacité de la circoncision pour la prévention du VIH chez les hommes ont débuté en Afrique. Cette revue évalue les résultats de ces essais, qui ont analysé l'efficacité et la sûreté de la circoncision pour la prévention de l'acquisition du VIH chez les hommes hétérosexuels.

Objectifs

Évaluer les preuves de l'effet de la circoncision pour la prévention de l'acquisition du VIH-1 et du VIH-2 chez l'homme à travers les rapports hétérosexuels

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons formulé une stratégie de recherche documentaire compréhensive et exhaustive dans le but d'identifier toutes les études pertinentes quels que soient la langue ou l'état de la publication (publié, non publié, sous presse et en cours). En juillet 2007, nous avons effectué des recherches dans les journaux et bases de données d'essais électroniques suivants : MEDLINE, EMBASE, et CENTRAL. Nous avons également effectué des recherches dans les bases de données électroniques des conférences NLM Gateway et AIDSearch ainsi que les registres d’essais ClinicalTrials.gov et Current Controlled Trials. Nous avons contacté les chercheurs et organisations pertinentes et consulté les listes bibliographiques de toutes les études incluses.

Critères de sélection

Essais contrôlés randomisés de la circoncision par rapport à l'absence de circoncision chez les hommes hétérosexuels séronégatifs avec incidence du VIH comme critère de jugement principal.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment évalué l'éligibilité de l'étude, extrait les données et noté la qualité méthodologique. L'extraction des données et la qualité méthodologique ont été vérifiées par un troisième auteur qui a résolu les divergences rencontrées. Les données ont été considérées cliniquement homogènes et des méta-analyses ainsi que des analyses de sensibilité ont été réalisées.

Résultats Principaux

Trois grands ECR d'hommes issus de la population générale ont été conduits en Afrique du Sud (N = 3 274), en Ouganda (N = 4 996) et au Kenya (N = 2 784) entre 2002 et 2006. Les trois essais ont tous été arrêtés prématurément en raison de découvertes significatives lors des analyses intermédiaires. Nous avons combiné les estimations de survie des trois essais à 12 mois, ainsi qu'à 21 ou 24 mois, dans une méta-analyse utilisant les analyses de cas disponibles à l'aide d'un modèle à effets aléatoires. Le risque relatif d'incidence (RRI) résultant était de 0,50 à 12 mois avec un intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % de 0,34 à 0,72 ; et de 0,46 à 21 ou 24 mois (IC à 95 % : 0,34 à 0,62). Ces RRI peuvent être interprétés comme réduction du risque relatif d'acquisition du VIH de 50 % à 12 mois et de 54 % à 21 ou 24 mois suivant la circoncision. Il existait une petite hétérogénéité statistique entre les résultats des essais (χ² = 0,60 ; df = 2 ; p = 0,74 et χ² = 0,31 ; df = 2 ; p = 0,86) avec le degré d'hétérogénéité quantifié par I² à 0 % dans les deux analyses. Nous avons étudié la sensibilité des RRI et conduit des méta-analyses des RRI rapportés, des RRI rapportés par protocole, et avons rapporté la totalité de l'analyse d'intention de traiter. Les résultats obtenus n'étaient pas considérablement différents des méta-analyses de cas disponibles, avec le critère de circoncision affichant des effets significatifs de protection à travers l'ensemble des analyses.

Nous avons conduit une méta-analyse des critères de jugement secondaires mesurant le comportement sexuel pour les essais au Kenya et en Ouganda, et n'avons pas trouvé de différences significatives entre les hommes circoncis et non circoncis. Pour l'essai en Afrique du Sud, le nombre moyen de contacts sexuels lors de la visite à 12 mois était de 5,9 dans le groupe de circoncision par rapport à 5 dans le groupe de contrôle, représentant une différence statistique significative (p <  0,001). Cette différence est restée statistiquement significative lors de la visite à 21 mois (7,5 par rapport à 6,4 ; p = 0,0015). Aucune autre différence significative n’a été observée.

L'incidence des événements indésirables suivant la procédure chirurgicale de circoncision était faible dans les trois essais.

Le rapport de la qualité méthodologique était variable à travers les trois essais mais, globalement, le potentiel de biais significatifs affectant les résultats des essais a été jugé de faible à modéré au vu des grandes tailles d'échantillons des essais, l'équilibre entre les variables de confusion possibles à travers les groupes randomisés de départ dans les trois essais, et l'utilisation de données statistiques acceptables pour les règles d'arrêt précoce.

Conclusions des auteurs

Il existe des preuves solides montrant que la circoncision masculine médicale réduit l'acquisition du VIH par les hommes hétérosexuels de 38 % à 66 % après 24 mois. L'incidence des événements indésirables est très faible, indiquant que la circoncision masculine, conduite sous ces conditions, est une procédure sûre. L'inclusion de la circoncision dans les mesures actuelles de prévention du VIH est garantie, mais des recherches supplémentaires sont nécessaires à l'évaluation de la faisabilité, la désirabilité et la rentabilité de la mise en place de la procédure au sein de contextes locaux.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Abstract
  7. Plain language summary

La circoncision pour la prévention de l'acquisition hétérosexuelle du VIH chez les hommes

La circoncision pour la prévention de l'acquisition hétérosexuelle du VIH chez les hommes

Les résultats de trois grands essais contrôlés randomisés conduits en Afrique ont livré des preuves solides montrant que la circoncision représentait une prévention pour les hommes de la population générale dans l'acquisition hétérosexuelle du VIH. Au niveau local, des recherches supplémentaires seront nécessaires afin de pouvoir évaluer si la mise en place de l'intervention est faisable, appropriée et rentable dans différents paramètres.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 3rd May, 2013
Traduction financée par: Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Abstract
  7. Plain language summary

Circuncisão masculina para prevenção da transmissão heterossexual do HIV em homens

Background

A circuncisão masculina é definida como a remoção cirúrgica de todo ou parte do prepúcio do pênis. Pode ser praticada como parte de um ritual religioso, como um procedimento médico ou como parte de um rito de passagem como iniciação para a masculinidade adulta. Desde os anos 1980, mais de 30 estudos observacionais vem sugerindo que a circuncisão masculina teria um papel preventivo na transmissão do HIV em homens heterossexuais. Em 2002, três ensaios clínicos randomizados foram realizados na Africa para avaliar a eficácia da circuncisão masculina na prevenção da contaminação de homens pelo HIV. Esta revisão avaliou os resultados desses ensaios clínicos que avaliaram a efetividade e segurança da circuncisão masculina na prevenção da contaminação de homens heterossexuais pelo HIV.

Objectives

Avaliar as evidências sobre os efeitos da circuncisão masculina na prevenção da contaminação de homens pelos vírus HIV-1 e HIV-2 através de relação heterossexual.

Search methods

Foi criada uma estratégia de busca abrangente e exaustiva para tentar identificar todos os estudos relevantes, independentemente do idioma ou status de publicação (publicados, não publicados, em vias de publicação e em andamento). Em 2007 rodamos a busca nas seguintes bases de dados eletrônicas: MEDLINE, EMBASE e CENTRAL. A busca também foi realizada nas bases eletrônicas de conferências NLM Gateway and AIDSearch e nas plataformas de registro de ensaios clínicos ClinicalTrials.gov e Current Controlled Trials. Entramos em contato com pesquisadores e com organizações relevantes e analisamos as referências nas listas bibliográficas de todos os estudos incluídos.

Selection criteria

Ensaios clínicos randomizados controlados sobre circuncisão masculina versus não fazer circuncisão, em homens heterossexuais HIV-negativos, que tivessem como desfecho primário a incidência de HIV.

Data collection and analysis

Dois revisores avaliaram de forma independente a elegibilidade dos estudos, fizeram a extração dos dados e avaliaram a qualidade metodológica dos estudos. A extração dos dados e a qualidade metodológica dos estudos foram verificadas por um terceiro revisor que também resolveu eventuais discordâncias entre os revisores. Os dados foram considerados clinicamente homogêneos o que levou à realização de meta-análises e análises de sensibilidade.

Main results

Entre 2002 e 2006, foram realizados três grandes ensaios clínicos com homens da população geral na Africa do Sul (N=3274), Uganda (N=4996) e Quênia (N= 2784). Combinamos os dados dos três estudos sobre sobrevida com 12, 21 ou 24 meses, produzindo meta-análises com efeito randômico. A razão de risco de incidência (incidence risk ratio- IRR) aos 12 meses foi de 0,50 com intervalo de confiança de 95% (IC95%) de 0,34 até 0,72. Com 21 meses e 24 meses, a IRR foi de 0,46 (IC 95% 0,34 até 0,62). Estas IRR podem ser interpretadas como sendo uma redução de 50% do risco relativo de contrair HIV, 12 meses depois de realizar a circuncisão e de 54%, com 21 ou 24 meses após a cirurgia. Foi observada pouca heterogeneidade estatística entre os resultados dos ensaios clínicos (χ² = 0.60; df = 2; p = 0.74 and χ² = 0.31; df = 2; p = 0.86) e o grau de heterogeneidade de ambas as análises foi I2 = 0%. Investigamos a sensibilidade dos IRRs calculados e fizemos meta-análises dos IRRs relatados, dos IRRs por protocolo relatados e da análise por intenção de tratar completa relatada pelos autores. Os resultados não diferiram muito daqueles obtidos através das meta-análises dos casos, sendo que a circuncisão teve um efeito protetor significativo em todas as análises. Fizemos uma meta-análise dos desfechos secundários medindo o comportamento sexual dos participantes dos estudos do Quênia e Uganda e não encontramos diferenças entre os homens com ou sem circuncisão. No estudo da Africa do Sul, o número médio de contatos sexuais no retorno de 12 meses foi 5,9 no grupo dos homens com circuncisão versus 5 no grupo controle, uma diferença estatisticamente significativa (p< 0,001). Esta diferença continuou estatisticamente significativa no retorno de 21 meses (7,5 versus 6,4; p = 0,0015). Não foram identificadas outras diferenças significativas. A incidência de eventos adversos após a cirurgia de circuncisão foi baixa nos três estudos. Os três estudos tiveram uma qualidade metodológica variável. Porém, em geral, a possibilidade de existir vieses capazes de afetar os resultados dos estudos foi considerada pequena a moderada, devido aos grandes tamanhos amostrais dos estudos, a distribuição equilibrada de fatores de confusão entre os grupos randomizados e ao uso de regras estatísticas aceitáveis para interrupção precoce dos estudos.

Authors' conclusions

Existem fortes evidências de que a circuncisão masculina médica reduz em 38% até 66% a contaminação por HIV ao longo de 24 meses, em homens heterossexuais. A incidência de eventos adversos é muito baixa, o que indica que a circuncisão masculina é um procedimento seguro quando realizado nessas condições. Justifica-se a inclusão da circuncisão masculina nas diretrizes atuais de prevenção do HIV. São necessários mais estudos para avaliar a viabilidade, aceitabilidade e o custo-efetividade de implementar esta intervenção dentro de contextos locais.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Abstract
  7. Plain language summary

Circuncisão masculina para prevenção da transmissão heterossexual do HIV em homens

Circuncisão masculina para prevenir a contaminação de HIV nos homens

Existem fortes evidências, provenientes dos resultados de três grandes ensaios clínicos randomizados conduzidos na Africa, de que a circuncisão masculina previne a contaminação por HIV de homens heterossexuais da população geral. São necessários mais estudos locais para avaliar se a implementação dessa intervenção seria viável, apropriada e economicamente efetiva dentro de diferentes contextos locais.

Translation notes

Translated by: Brazilian Cochrane Centre