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Splenectomy versus conservative management for acute sequestration crises in people with sickle cell disease

  1. Shirley Owusu-Ofori1,*,
  2. Ceri Hirst2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group

Published Online: 31 MAY 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 19 APR 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003425.pub2


How to Cite

Owusu-Ofori S, Hirst C. Splenectomy versus conservative management for acute sequestration crises in people with sickle cell disease. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 5. Art. No.: CD003425. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003425.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Transfusion Medicine Unit, Kumasi, Ghana

  2. 2

    AstraZeneca, Alderley Park, Cheshire, UK

*Shirley Owusu-Ofori, Transfusion Medicine Unit, Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, P.O.Box 1934, Kumasi, Ghana. sowusu_ofori@hotmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Stable (no update expected for reasons given in 'What's new')
  2. Published Online: 31 MAY 2013

SEARCH

 

Background

  1. Top of page
  2. Background
  3. Objectives
  4. Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Authors' conclusions
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. Data and analyses
  10. Appendices
  11. What's new
  12. History
  13. Contributions of authors
  14. Declarations of interest
  15. Sources of support
  16. Index terms
 

Description of the condition

Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a generic term for a group of inherited genetic disorders of haemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying protein contained in red blood cells. Under low oxygen tension the abnormal haemoglobin polymerises, distorting the red blood cells into a sickle shape. This sickling has two effects; firstly the sickled cells block small blood vessels resulting in tissue damage; and secondly the sickled cells are easily removed from circulation, resulting in anaemia. Common complications of SCD include increased severity of infections, pain episodes, stroke, kidney failure, chest infections and lung damage (acute sickle chest syndrome). In addition, growth and development may be delayed (Platt 1984).

Sickle cell disease was originally a disease of African, Indian, and Middle Eastern heritage because the carrier state affords protection against severe malaria; but migration has now made it a global problem (Davies 1989). The inheritance is in an autosomal recessive pattern, so individuals with SCD have inherited abnormal genes from both parents. The inheritance of the gene for sickle haemoglobin may be combined with those for other structurally abnormal haemoglobins, such as haemoglobin C, and also with abnormalities of haemoglobin production, such as beta thalassaemia.

Splenic sequestration occurs when red blood cells become entrapped in the spleen, which enlarges, pooling and then destroying the red blood cells. It is defined clinically as a fall of two grams per decilitre (g/dl) or more in blood haemoglobin concentration from the persons' normal levels, and an enlarging spleen (Topley 1981). Splenic sequestration crisis can be either acute or chronic. An acute splenic sequestration (ASS) is when splenic sequestration occurs rapidly. It manifests clinically as abdominal pain and distension, pallor, weakness, breathlessness, and rapid heart rate (Al-Salem 1999). Chronic sequestration (hypersplenism) has a gradual onset and can follow an attack of ASS (Topley 1981).

The incidence of ASS in homozygous SCD is highest in young children, ranging from 7% to 30% in children up to two years of age (Powell 1992; Topley 1981). After infection, ASS is the second most common cause of death in the first decade of life accounting for between 15% to 44% of deaths in this period (Emond 1985; Powell 1992; Topley 1981). The first attack can occur in infants as young as five weeks (Airede 1992), but attacks are uncommon after puberty. Most cases are seen in individuals with homozygous SS, but have also been reported in S beta thalassaemia and SC. Mortality can be reduced by the early detection of SCD by neonatal screening, followed by parental education (to detect splenic enlargement and pallor) and by early clinical intervention (Emond 1985; Powell 1992).

Acute splenic sequestration crisis is a medical emergency that requires the immediate restoration of blood volume, usually with red cell transfusions. ASS recurs in about 50% of survivors of the first attack with diminishing intervals between subsequent crises (Emond 1985). The mortality rate of the survivors who suffer a recurrence is approximately 20% (Topley 1981). Due to the frequency of recurrences, both long-term blood transfusion therapy and the surgical removal of the spleen (splenectomy) have been used as methods to prevent further ASS and death (Grover 1990).

Although transfusions have been used to reduce the frequency of attacks of ASS, they are expensive, time-consuming, and are associated with adverse effects including development of antibodies to red blood cells (alloimmunization), iron overload, transmission of blood-borne infections such as hepatitis and HIV, and allergic reactions (Rao 1985).

 

Description of the intervention

Splenectomy (full, partial, and embolisation) is also used to prevent ASS. The advantages of having a splenectomy include stopping blood transfusions and the absence of discomfort from mechanical pressure of the enlarged spleen (Al-Salem 1999). The main objection to performing a splenectomy in young children with SCD is the increased risk of infection. The risk of septicaemia after splenectomy is approximately 2% overall, 4% in children less than four years of age, and can be 30% or more in children in the first year of life (Idowu 1998). Current United Kingdom (UK) guidelines recommend that people who have had a splenectomy should receive lifelong prophylactic penicillin, and be given pneumococcal vaccine before surgery with boosters every three years after splenectomy. Haemophilus influenzae (H. influenzae) type b and meningococcal vaccines have also been recommended (WPBCSH 1996). There is also concern that children living in malaria endemic regions have an increased risk of malarial attacks following a splenectomy (Evans 1945). The fear of loss of the immune protection the spleen gives to the body and of having to undergo surgery are disincentives for splenectomy. Partial splenectomies are performed as an alternative in children in order to try and retain some immune competence, which would otherwise have been lost (Idowu 1998). Other problems associated with partial or full splenectomy include: the risk of having recurrences of ASS in the remnant spleen; and anaesthetic and surgical complications, such as left lower lung collapse.

 

Why it is important to do this review

As there is continuing debate over the risks and benefits of splenectomy compared to repeated exchange transfusion as strategies to avoid recurrent attacks of ASS, we have reviewed the advantages and disadvantages of both full and partial splenectomy to prevent recurrence of ASS in people with SCD.

 

Objectives

  1. Top of page
  2. Background
  3. Objectives
  4. Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Authors' conclusions
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. Data and analyses
  10. Appendices
  11. What's new
  12. History
  13. Contributions of authors
  14. Declarations of interest
  15. Sources of support
  16. Index terms

To determine whether a full or partial splenectomy, by whatever means, performed to prevent acute splenic sequestration improved survival and decreased morbidity in people with SCD, as compared with regular blood transfusion.

 

Methods

  1. Top of page
  2. Background
  3. Objectives
  4. Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Authors' conclusions
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. Data and analyses
  10. Appendices
  11. What's new
  12. History
  13. Contributions of authors
  14. Declarations of interest
  15. Sources of support
  16. Index terms
 

Criteria for considering studies for this review

 

Types of studies

Randomized (RCT) or quasi-randomized trials. Trials in which quasi-randomized methods, such as alternation, were to be included if there was sufficient evidence that the treatment and control groups were similar at baseline.

 

Types of participants

All people with confirmed SCD (including SS, SC, SßO, Sß+ proven by haemoglobin electrophoresis) who had experienced at least one ASS crisis.

In this review we defined an ASS crisis as a fall in haemoglobin of at least 2 g/dl from steady-state levels, an acutely enlarging spleen, and evidence of reticulocytosis indicating an increased bone marrow response (Topley 1981).

 

Types of interventions

Full or partial splenectomy to prevent an ASS compared to conservative management (no treatment or a regimen of regular blood transfusions e.g. four-weekly) to prevent an ASS.

 

Types of outcome measures

 

Primary outcomes

  1. Death
  2. Episodes of ASS (in individuals who either had a partial splenectomy or conservative management)

 

Secondary outcomes

  1. Pneumococcal infections
  2. Other infections including malaria
  3. Blood transfusions
  4. Number of days as a hospital inpatient
  5. People experiencing sickle-related events (pain episodes, stroke, kidney failure, and chest syndrome)
  6. People developing chronic hypersplenism
  7. Adverse effects of interventions including development of alloantibodies, blood-borne infections, iron overload, surgical complications, or any other adverse effects

 

Search methods for identification of studies

 

Electronic searches

A comprehensive search strategy was formulated in an attempt to identify all relevant trials regardless of language or publication status (published, unpublished, in press, and in progress).

Relevant trials were identified from the Group's Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register using the terms: sickle cell AND (splenectomy OR pneumococcal).

The Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register is compiled from electronic searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (updated each new issue of The Cochrane Library) and quarterly searches of MEDLINE. Unpublished work is identified by searching the abstract books of five major conferences: the European Haematology Association conference; the American Society of Hematology conference; the British Society for Haematology Annual Scientific Meeting; the Caribbean Health Research Council Meetings; and the National Sickle Cell Disease Program Annual Meeting. For full details of all searching activities for the register, please see the relevant section of the Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group Module.

In addition to the above, further subject specific electronic searches of MEDLINE (1966 to June 2003) and EMBASE (1988 to June 2003) were carried out. This was in combination with The Cochrane Collaboration's highly sensitive search strategy detailed in the Cochrane Reviewers' Handbook (Clarke 2001). For the full search strategy used, please see the appendix attached to this review (Appendix 1).

Date of the most recent search of the Group's Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register: 06 December 2012.

 

Searching other resources

Additional trials were sought from the reference lists of the trials and reviews identified by the search strategy.

 

Data collection and analysis

 

Selection of studies

We did not apply the process described below, as we were not able to identify any trials eligible for inclusion. However, if we include any trials in future updates of this review, we will apply the following methods.

The two authors will independently identify potentially relevant trials from the results of the searches. Both authors will independently apply an eligibility form to potentially relevant trials. The form will take into account the inclusion criteria as described in the 'Criteria for considering studies for this review'. We will resolve disagreements by discussion, or if necessary by consulting a third party. The reasons for excluding trials will then be stated in the review.

 

Data extraction and management

Each author will independently extract data on trial information including methods, participants, interventions and outcomes. We will check any discrepancies that occur in data extraction by referring to the original paper. One author (SOO) will enter data into Review Manager software (Review Manager 2011).

We planned to group outcome data into those measured at one week and one, three, six and twelve months and annually thereafter. If outcome data were recorded at other time periods consideration would be given to examining those as well.

 

Assessment of risk of bias in included studies

Each review author will independently assess trials following the domain-based evaluation as described in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions 5.2 (Higgins 2011). The assessments will be compared and any inconsistencies between the review authors will be discussed and resolved.

Assessment will be made of the following domains, each will be assessed as having either a low, unclear or high risk of bias.

  1. Generation of the allocation sequence
  2. Concealment of allocation
  3. Blinding (of participants, personnel and outcome assessors)
  4. Incomplete outcome data
  5. Selective outcome reporting

 

Measures of treatment effect

Where appropriate, we will analyze data using Review Manager software (Review Manager 2011). We will combine binary data using the Mantel-Haenszel odds ratio or risk ratio where appropriate. We will use mean difference for continuous data, which has been reported using means and standard deviations. Any skewed data found, will be analyzed using the most appropriate method available, e.g. transforming data or summary statistics. We will present continuous data, reported using medians and ranges, in tables only. With event counts, though it would be preferable to state beforehand how data will be analyzed, we will analyze such data in one of several ways based on the format of the data available. We will decide to make the outcome being considered either dichotomous, continuous, time-to-event or a rate, and then extract counts accordingly.

 

Dealing with missing data

Where the trials have been published in abstract form, presented at meetings, or reported to the authors, we will seek full reports from the trial authors. We will contact the primary investigator if information is missing or unclear.

 

Assessment of heterogeneity

We will measure the degree of heterogeneity between trials using the I2 statistic from the meta-analysis. The I2 quantifies the effect of heterogeneity by providing a measure of the degree of inconsistency in the trial results (Higgins 2003).

 

Assessment of reporting biases

We will examine funnel plots for asymmetry. Selection biases e.g. publication and location biases, poor methodological quality of studies and heterogeneity may be some causes of funnel plot asymmetry.

 

Data synthesis

In the absence of homogeneity of treatment effects, we will use a random-effect approach, otherwise, we will use the fixed-effect model.

 

Subgroup analysis and investigation of heterogeneity

If there are a sufficient number of trials, we will explore the following sources of heterogeneity:

  1. type of sickle cell disease;
  2. age;
  3. partial or complete splenectomy or embolisation;
  4. transfusion regimens i.e. either at four-weekly intervals or periods more than four-weekly intervals, top up transfusions or exchange, or transfusions when HbS mean less than 40% or more than 40%;
  5. developed versus developing countries.

 

Results

  1. Top of page
  2. Background
  3. Objectives
  4. Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Authors' conclusions
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. Data and analyses
  10. Appendices
  11. What's new
  12. History
  13. Contributions of authors
  14. Declarations of interest
  15. Sources of support
  16. Index terms
 

Description of studies

No trials were found that were eligible for inclusion in the review.

 

Risk of bias in included studies

No trials were included in the review.

 

Effects of interventions

No trials were eligible for inclusion in the review.

 

Discussion

  1. Top of page
  2. Background
  3. Objectives
  4. Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Authors' conclusions
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. Data and analyses
  10. Appendices
  11. What's new
  12. History
  13. Contributions of authors
  14. Declarations of interest
  15. Sources of support
  16. Index terms

There is a paucity of evidence to support splenectomy, by whatever means, performed to improve survival and decrease morbidity from acute splenic sequestration (ASS).

Common practice for the initial management of ASS is red cell transfusion to manage shock (hypovolaemia) and to alleviate symptoms of anaemia. After this, the long-term management options are a splenectomy; a transfusion programme; or careful observation for early signs of ASS until the spleen gradually becomes non-functional (splenic atrophy). In certain places, the choice of treatment depends on the severity of the initial episode of ASS and the age of individual. In developing countries, where the regular supply of 'zero-risk' blood may not be constant, chronic transfusion programmes are hardly considered as part of management of ASS. Chronic transfusions have been advocated by some, to protect susceptible children from recurrent attacks of ASS until splenic atrophy has occurred (Topley 1981).

Splenectomies have also been suggested for children with a variety of presentations (Grover 1990; Topley 1981; Wright 1999). The obvious advantage of having the spleen removed is that it prevents recurrent events, but the counter arguments are that splenectomy compromises their already impaired immune status and the operation being unnecessary in a condition in which the spleen is likely to become non-functional. Another debatable point is whether the spleen, after an attack of ASS, or in established hypersplenism (i.e. chronic enlargement of spleen with a persistent reduction in haemoglobin level), makes any contribution to the immune status of the individual. It is also prudent to bear in mind that the child with sickle cell anaemia after surgical splenectomy may have a similar risk as one in whom the natural phenomenon of 'autosplenectomy' (nature's own physiological spleen removal) has occurred.

Few people with SCD in developed countries, who are known to have received prophylactic penicillin and pneumococcal and H. influenzae vaccines after splenectomy, go on to suffer overwhelming infection (Emond 1984; Kinney 1990). In the UK, guidelines for the prevention and treatment of infection in people with an absent or dysfunctional spleen (asplenia) recommend pneumococcal and H. influenzae type b immunization, as well as life-long prophylactic antibiotics (WPBCSH 1996). The above prophylactic measures may reduce the risk of septicaemia but may not guarantee protection from penicillin-resistant organisms. Asplenic individuals are at risk of severe falciparum malaria and thus adherence to antimalarial prophylaxis in malaria endemic regions cannot be overemphasised (Evans 1945).

Different forms of splenectomy (such as partial splenectomy, splenic embolisation, and splenic irradiation) are employed in the management of chronic splenic enlargement in order to preserve splenic tissue and function (Idowu 1998; Pinca 1992). The advantages of less invasive procedures include avoidance of large scars, and the absence of high platelet counts normally resulting from splenectomy. Disadvantages such as infections and the reappearance of hypersplenism could result. Laparoscopic splenectomy is also another described alternative (Hendricks 2000).

Clinicians must, however, bear in mind that the risks of splenectomy should be compared with those of potential therapies such as blood transfusion and weighed against the dangers of their complications. It should also be considered that the natural history of ASS shows recurrence after the age of five years to be less likely.

 

Authors' conclusions

  1. Top of page
  2. Background
  3. Objectives
  4. Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Authors' conclusions
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. Data and analyses
  10. Appendices
  11. What's new
  12. History
  13. Contributions of authors
  14. Declarations of interest
  15. Sources of support
  16. Index terms

 

Implications for practice

No RCTs of splenectomy for splenic sequestration were found for inclusion in this review. Therefore, the research evidence on which to base clinical decisions is limited to case series and other less robust trials.

We have not identified any relevant trials up to December 2012. We therefore do not plan to update this review until new trials are published.

 
Implications for research

This systematic review has identified the need for a well-designed, adequately-powered RCT to assess the benefits and risks of splenectomy compared to transfusion programmes, as a means of improving survival and decreasing mortality from ASS in people with SCD.

 

Acknowledgements

  1. Top of page
  2. Background
  3. Objectives
  4. Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Authors' conclusions
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. Data and analyses
  10. Appendices
  11. What's new
  12. History
  13. Contributions of authors
  14. Declarations of interest
  15. Sources of support
  16. Index terms

The protocol for this review was developed during the Mentorship Programme organized by the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group, May to June 2001. The Department for International Development (UK) supports this Programme through the Effective Health Care Alliance Programme at the Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine.

We thank all our referees for their constructive criticism and suggestions.

 

Data and analyses

  1. Top of page
  2. Background
  3. Objectives
  4. Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Authors' conclusions
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. Data and analyses
  10. Appendices
  11. What's new
  12. History
  13. Contributions of authors
  14. Declarations of interest
  15. Sources of support
  16. Index terms

This review has no analyses.

 

Appendices

  1. Top of page
  2. Background
  3. Objectives
  4. Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Authors' conclusions
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. Data and analyses
  10. Appendices
  11. What's new
  12. History
  13. Contributions of authors
  14. Declarations of interest
  15. Sources of support
  16. Index terms
 

Appendix 1. MEDLINE (1966 to June 2003) and EMBASE (1988 to June 2003)


MEDLINE/EMBASE -OVID

1. exp hemoglobinopathies/
2. sickle cell.tw.
3. (hemoglobin ss or hemoglobin sc or hemoglobin c).ti,ab.
4. (haemoglobin ss or haemoglobin sc or haemoglobin c).ti,ab.
5. meniscocytosis.tw.

6. hemoglobinopath$.tw.
7. haemoglobinopath$.tw.
8. drepanocyt$.tw.
9. thalassemia.tw.
10.'splenic sequestration'.ti,ab.

11. 'acute splenic sequestration cris$'.ti,ab.
12. assc.tw.
13. hypersplenism.tw.
14. hypersplenism/
15. splenomegaly/

16. splenomegaly.tw.
17. spleen.tw.
18. or/1-17
19. splenectomy/
20. splenectomy.tw.

21. blood transfusion/
22. blood transfusion.tw.
23. red cell transfusion.tw.
24. 19 or 20 or 21 or 22 or 23
25. 18 and 24

26. limit 25 to human



 

What's new

  1. Top of page
  2. Background
  3. Objectives
  4. Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Authors' conclusions
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. Data and analyses
  10. Appendices
  11. What's new
  12. History
  13. Contributions of authors
  14. Declarations of interest
  15. Sources of support
  16. Index terms

Last assessed as up-to-date: 19 April 2013.


DateEventDescription

11 September 2013Review declared as stableThis review was first published in 2002 in which no trials were included. We have not identified any relevant trials up to May 2013. We therefore do not plan to update this review until new trials are published, although we will search the Group's Cystic Fibrosis Trials Register on a two-yearly cycle.



 

History

  1. Top of page
  2. Background
  3. Objectives
  4. Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Authors' conclusions
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. Data and analyses
  10. Appendices
  11. What's new
  12. History
  13. Contributions of authors
  14. Declarations of interest
  15. Sources of support
  16. Index terms

Protocol first published: Issue 1, 2002
Review first published: Issue 4, 2002


DateEventDescription

19 April 2013New citation required but conclusions have not changedThe review has been updated with minor changes made throughout.

19 April 2013New search has been performedA search of the Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register did not identify any potentially eligible trials.

8 October 2010New search has been performedA search of the Group's Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register identified no trials potentially eligible for inclusion in the review.

26 April 2010AmendedContact details updated.

7 November 2008AmendedConverted to new review format.

29 August 2008New search has been performedA search of the Group's Haemoglobinopathies Trials Register did not identify any potentially eligible trials.

1 February 2008AmendedThe original 'Synopsis' has been updated with a new 'Plain language summary' in line with guideance from The Cochrane Colloboration.

1 February 2008New search has been performedA search of the Group's Trials Register identified no additional trials eligible for inclusion in this review.

1 February 2007New search has been performedA search of the Group's Trials Register identified no additional trials eligible for inclusion in this review.

1 December 2005New search has been performedA search of the Group's Trials Register identified no additional trials eligible for inclusion in this review.

1 October 2004New search has been performedA search of the Group's Trials Register identified no additional trials eligible for inclusion in this review.

1 July 2003New search has been performedNo new studies were identified for inclusion in this review.



 

Contributions of authors

  1. Top of page
  2. Background
  3. Objectives
  4. Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Authors' conclusions
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. Data and analyses
  10. Appendices
  11. What's new
  12. History
  13. Contributions of authors
  14. Declarations of interest
  15. Sources of support
  16. Index terms

This review was conceived by the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group and designed by Dr Owusu-Ofori.

Dr Owusu-Ofori, Dr Riddington and the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group conducted searches for relevant trials.

Dr Owusu-Ofori and Dr Hirst planned to screen, appraise and abstract data for the review.

Dr Owusu-Ofori and Dr Hirst will seek additional information from authors, where necessary.

Dr Owusu-Ofori will perform data entry for future updates. Dr Owusu-Ofori and Dr Hirst will interpret the data with advice from the Cochrane Cystic Fibrosis and Genetic Disorders Group.

Dr Owusu-Ofori took the lead in the write up of the original review and the updated reviews.

 

Declarations of interest

  1. Top of page
  2. Background
  3. Objectives
  4. Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Authors' conclusions
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. Data and analyses
  10. Appendices
  11. What's new
  12. History
  13. Contributions of authors
  14. Declarations of interest
  15. Sources of support
  16. Index terms

Since completion of the review, Ceri Hirst has received funding from several pharmaceutical companies for contract research unrelated to the review topic.

 

Sources of support

  1. Top of page
  2. Background
  3. Objectives
  4. Methods
  5. Results
  6. Discussion
  7. Authors' conclusions
  8. Acknowledgements
  9. Data and analyses
  10. Appendices
  11. What's new
  12. History
  13. Contributions of authors
  14. Declarations of interest
  15. Sources of support
  16. Index terms
 

Internal sources

  • No sources of support supplied

 

External sources

  • Department of Health - Research & Development Programme, UK.

References

Additional references

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Background
  4. Objectives
  5. Methods
  6. Results
  7. Discussion
  8. Authors' conclusions
  9. Acknowledgements
  10. Data and analyses
  11. Appendices
  12. What's new
  13. History
  14. Contributions of authors
  15. Declarations of interest
  16. Sources of support
  17. Additional references
  18. References to other published versions of this review
Airede 1992
Al-Salem 1999
  • Al-Salem AH, Naserullah Z, Qaisaruddin S, Al-Abkari H, Al-Faraj A, Yassin YM. Splenic complications of the sickling syndromes and the role of splenectomy. Journal of Pediatric Haematology/Oncology 1999;21(5):401-6.
Clarke 2001
  • Clarke M, Oxman AD, editors. Optimal search strategy. Cochrane Reviewers' Handbook 4.1.4 [updated October 2001]; Appendix 5c. In: The Cochrane Library [database on disk and CDROM]. The Cochrane Collaboration. Oxford: Update Software; 2002, Issue 3.
Davies 1989
Emond 1984
  • Emond AM, Morais P, Venugopal S, Carpenter RG, Sergeant GR. Role of splenectomy in homozygous sickle cell disease in childhood. Lancet 1984;1(8368):88-90.
Emond 1985
Evans 1945
  • Evans RW. Anaemia associated with the sickle cell trait in British West African Natives. Transactions of the Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene 1945;39:207-20.
Grover 1990
  • Grover R, Wethers DL. Management of acute splenic sequestration crises in sickle cell disease. Journal of the Association of Academic Minority Physicians 1990;1(3):67-70.
Hendricks 2000
  • Hendricks-Ferguson VL, Nelson MA. Laparoscopic splenectomy for splenic sequestration crises. Association of Operating Room Nurses Journal 2000;71(4):820-2, 825-8, 831-4.
Higgins 2003
Higgins 2011
  • Higgins JPT, Altman DG (editors). Chapter 8: Assessing risk of bias in included studies. In: Higgins JPT, Green S (editors). Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions Version 5.1.0 [updated March 2011]. The Cochrane Collaboration, 2011. Available from www.cochrane-handbook.org.
Idowu 1998
Kinney 1990
  • Kinney TR, Ware RE, Schultz WH, Filston HC. Long-term management of splenic sequestration in children with sickle cell disease. Journal of Pediatrics 1990;117(2 Pt 1):194-9.
Pinca 1992
  • Pinca A, Di Palma A, Soriano S, Sprocati M, Mannella P, Georgaco Bagni B, et al. Effectiveness of partial splenic embolization as treatment for hypersplenism in thalassaemia major: a 7-year follow-up. European Journal of Haematology 1992;49(2):49-52.
Platt 1984
Powell 1992
Rao 1985
  • Rao S, Gooden S. Splenic sequestration in sickle cell disease: Role of transfusion therapy. American Journal of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology 1985;7(3):298-301.
Review Manager 2011
  • The Nordic Cochrane Centre, The Cochrane Collaboration. Review Manager (RevMan). 5.2. Copenhagen: The Nordic Cochrane Centre, The Cochrane Collaboration, 2011.
Topley 1981
  • Topley JM, Rogers DW, Stevens MC, Serjeant GR. Acute splenic sequestration and hypersplenism in the first five years in homozygous sickle cell disease. Archives of Disease in Childhood 1981;56(10):765-9.
WPBCSH 1996
  • Working Party of the British Committee for Standards in Haematology Clinical Haematology Task Force. Guidelines for the prevention and treatment of infection in patients with an absent or dysfunctional spleen. BMJ 1996;312(7028):430-4.
Wright 1999

References to other published versions of this review

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Background
  4. Objectives
  5. Methods
  6. Results
  7. Discussion
  8. Authors' conclusions
  9. Acknowledgements
  10. Data and analyses
  11. Appendices
  12. What's new
  13. History
  14. Contributions of authors
  15. Declarations of interest
  16. Sources of support
  17. Additional references
  18. References to other published versions of this review
Owusu-Ofori 2002
  • Owusu-Ofori S, Hirst C. Splenectomy versus conservative management for acute sequestration crises in people with sickle cell disease. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2002, Issue 4. [DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003425]