Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Orthodontic treatment for prominent lower front teeth (Class III malocclusion) in children

  1. Simon Watkinson1,
  2. Jayne E Harrison2,*,
  3. Susan Furness3,
  4. Helen V Worthington3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Oral Health Group

Published Online: 30 SEP 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 7 JAN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003451.pub2


How to Cite

Watkinson S, Harrison JE, Furness S, Worthington HV. Orthodontic treatment for prominent lower front teeth (Class III malocclusion) in children. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 9. Art. No.: CD003451. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003451.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Liverpool, Department of Orthodontics, Liverpool, UK

  2. 2

    Liverpool University Dental Hospital, Orthodontic Department, Liverpool, Merseyside, UK

  3. 3

    School of Dentistry, The University of Manchester, Cochrane Oral Health Group, Manchester, UK

*Jayne E Harrison, Orthodontic Department, Liverpool University Dental Hospital, Pembroke Place, Liverpool, Merseyside, L3 5PS, UK. jayne.harrison@rlbuht.nhs.uk. jeharrison@hotmail.co.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 30 SEP 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Prominent lower front teeth (termed reverse bite; under bite; Class III malocclusion) may be due to a combination of the jaw or tooth positions or both. The upper jaw (maxilla) can be too far back or the lower jaw (mandible) too far forward, or both. Prominent lower front teeth can also occur if the upper front teeth (incisors) are tipped back or the lower front teeth are tipped forwards, or both. Various treatment approaches have been described to correct prominent lower front teeth in children and adolescents.

Objectives

To assess the effects of orthodontic treatment for prominent lower front teeth in children and adolescents.

Search methods

We searched the following databases: Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 7 January 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 12), MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 7 January 2013), and EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 7 January 2013).

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) recruiting children or adolescents or both (aged 16 years or less) receiving any type of orthodontic treatment to correct prominent lower front teeth (Class III malocclusion). Orthodontic treatments were compared with control groups who received either no treatment, delayed treatment or a different active intervention.

Data collection and analysis

Screening of references, identification of included and excluded studies, data extraction and assessment of the risk of bias of the included studies was performed independently and in duplicate by two review authors. The mean differences with 95% confidence intervals were calculated for continuous data. Meta-analysis was only undertaken when studies of similar comparisons reported comparable outcome measures. A fixed-effect model was used. The I2 statistic was used as a measure of statistical heterogeneity.

Main results

Seven RCTs with a total of 339 participants were included in this review. One study was assessed as at low risk of bias, three studies were at high risk of bias, and in the remaining three studies risk of bias was unclear. Four studies reported on the use of a facemask, two on the chin cup, one on the tandem traction bow appliance, and one on mandibular headgear. One study reported on both the chin cup and mandibular headgear appliances.

One study (n = 73, low quality evidence), comparing a facemask to no treatment, reported a mean difference (MD) in overjet of 4.10 mm (95% confidence interval (CI) 3.04 to 5.16; P value < 0.0001) favouring the facemask treatment. Two studies comparing facemasks to untreated control did not report the outcome of overjet. Three studies (n = 155, low quality evidence) reported ANB (an angular measurement relating the positions of the top and bottom jaws) differences immediately after treatment with a facemask when compared to an untreated control. The pooled data showed a statistically significant MD in ANB in favour of the facemask of 3.93 ° (95% CI 3.46 to 4.39; P value < 0.0001). There was significant heterogeneity between these studies (I2 = 82%). This is likely to have been caused by the different populations studied and the different ages at the time of treatment.

One study (n = 73, low quality evidence) reported outcomes of the use of the facemask compared to an untreated control at three years follow-up. This study showed that improvements in overjet and ANB were still present three years post-treatment. In this study, adverse effects were reported but due to the low prevalence of temporomandibular (TMJ) signs and symptoms no analysis was undertaken.

Two studies (n = 90, low quality evidence) compared the chin cup with an untreated control. Both studies found a statistically significant improvement in ANB, and one study also found an improvement in the Wits appraisal. Data from these two studies were not suitable for pooling.

A single study of the tandem traction bow appliance compared to untreated control (n = 30, very low quality evidence) showed a statistically significant difference in both overjet and ANB favouring the intervention group.

The remaining two studies did not report the primary outcome of this review.

Authors' conclusions

There is some evidence that the use of a facemask to correct prominent lower front teeth in children is effective when compared to no treatment on a short-term basis. However, in view of the general poor quality of the included studies, these results should be viewed with caution. Further randomised controlled trials with long follow-up are required.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Treatment for prominent lower front teeth in children

Review question

There are many different ways of treating patients with prominent (or sticking out) lower front teeth. Orthodontic treatment for children and adolescents is one method used. This review, carried out by authors of the Cochrane Oral Health Group, sought to establish which is the most effective type of orthodontic treatment when carried out in childhood; whether these treatments reduce the need for treatment as an adult; and at what age these treatments are best carried out to ensure that changes made to the shape of the jaw and the positioning of the teeth last until the end of growth and can be maintained into adulthood.

In severe cases, people may need surgery as adults to correct this condition. If a successful approach to treatment in childhood were to be found, with long-lasting effects, this kind of surgery may not be necessary. Additionally, the risk of damage to teeth and joints, together with the negative psychological effects associated with the condition, could be lessened or avoided.

Background

Prominent lower front teeth can be an important problem for some people and are usually due to the way the jaws meet together. This condition may be the source of teasing, problems eating, and occasionally problems with speech. The condition may also give rise to problems with the jaw joints in later life. Orthodontic treatment relies on the use of appliances of various kinds either inside or outside of the mouth that are fixed in some way to the teeth, and sometimes placed on parts of the head, to influence the growth of the jaws and position of teeth.

This review looked at the use of four different types of orthodontic treatment for correcting prominent lower front teeth in children.

-Facemask: an appliance rests on the forehead and chin, connected to the upper teeth with elastic bands that are placed by the wearer. Through this arrangement a balanced force is applied, which it is hoped will pull the upper teeth and jaw forwards and downward to correct the prominent lower teeth.

-Chin cup: an appliance rests on the chin with a strap around the back of the head. Forward growth of the lower jaw is resisted, correcting the prominence of the lower front teeth. Nothing is placed in the mouth.

-Mandibular headgear: a strap rests on the back of the head and is connected to the lower teeth. This resists forward growth of the lower teeth and jaw in order to correct the prominent lower front teeth.

-Tandem traction bow appliance: attachments are fixed to the top and bottom teeth. In the top attachment there is a hook on each side. A metal bar is placed in the lower attachment, which sits in front of the lower teeth. An elastic band can then be placed on each side to pull the top jaw forward and bottom jaw backwards, to correct the prominent lower teeth.

Study characteristics

The evidence on which this review is based was found to be up to date as of 7 January 2013.

A total of seven suitable studies were identified and included in this review; they included 339 children aged from five to 11 years. There were roughly equal numbers of girls and boys in each study and participants were from different ethnic groups depending on where the study was carried out. Studies included were conducted in Turkey, Egypt, China, the United States of America and the United Kingdom.

Key results

This review found some evidence that the use of a facemask appliance can help to correct prominent lower front teeth on a short-term basis. There was no evidence available to show whether or not these short-term changes will still be maintained until the child is fully grown. There was not enough evidence to support any other types of treatment for prominent lower front teeth.

Quality of the evidence

The quality of the evidence for the use of a facemask was moderate to low, whilst the quality of the rest of the evidence was very low.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Traitement orthodontique chez les enfants présentant des dents avant inférieures proéminentes (malocclusion de classe III)

Contexte

La proéminence des dents avant inférieures (appelée occlusion inversée; occlusion antérieure; malocclusion de classe III) peut être due à la position de la mâchoire ou des dents, ou les deux combinées. La mâchoire supérieure (maxillaire) peut être trop éloignée ou la mâchoire inférieure (mandibule) trop avancée, ou les deux. La proéminence des dents avant inférieures peut également se produire si les dents avant supérieures (incisives) basculent vers l’arrière ou les dents avant basculent vers l’avant, ou les deux. Différentes approches de traitement ont été décrites pour corriger des dents avant inférieures proéminentes chez les enfants et les adolescents.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets du traitement orthodontique pour les dents avant inférieures proéminentes chez les enfants et les adolescents.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans les bases de données suivantes: Registre des essais contrôlés du groupe Cochrane sur la santé bucco-dentaire (jusqu' au 7 janvier 2013), le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) ( La Bibliothèque Cochrane 2012, numéro 12), MEDLINE via OVID (de 1946 au 7 janvier 2013) et EMBASE via OVID (de 1980 au 7 janvier 2013).

Critères de sélection

Les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) portaient sur des enfants ou des adolescents, ou les deux (âgés de 16 ans ou moins) ayant reçu tout type de traitement orthodontique pour corriger des dents avant inférieures proéminentes (malocclusion de classe III). Des traitements orthodontiques ont été comparés aux groupes témoins ayant procédé soit à une absence de traitement, soit à un traitement différé, soit à une autre intervention.

Recueil et analyse des données

La sélection des références, l'identification des études incluses et exclues, l'extraction des données et l'évaluation du risque de biais des études incluses a été réalisée de manière indépendante et en double par deux auteurs de la revue. Les différences de moyenne avec des intervalles de confiance à 95% ont été calculées pour des données en continu. Une méta-analyse était réalisée uniquement lorsque les études de comparaisons similaires avaient rapporté des résultats comparables. Un modèle à effets fixes a été utilisé. La statistique I 2 a été utilisé pour mesurer l'hétérogénéité statistique.

Résultats Principaux

Sept ECR portant sur un total de 339 participants ont été inclus dans cette revue. Une étude a été évaluée comme présentant un faible risque de biais, trois études étaient à risque de biais élevé et le risque de biais concernant les trois études restantes n'était pas clair. Quatre études portaient sur l'utilisation d'un masque facial, deux sur la fronde mentonnière, une sur le tandem traction bow appliance et une sur le casque mandibulaire. Une étude a rapporté à la fois sur la fronde mentonnière et sur le casque mandibulaire.

Une étude (n =73, preuves de faible qualité), comparant un masque facial à l'absence de traitement, rapportait une différence moyenne (DM) avec un overjet de 4,10 mm (intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95% 3,04 à 5,16; valeur P < 0,0001) favorisant le traitement au masque facial. Deux études comparant le masque facial à l’absence de traitement ne rapportaient pas les résultats d’overjet. Trois études (n =155, preuves de faible qualité) ont rapporté les différences d’ANB (mesure angulaire relatant les positions des mâchoires supérieures et inférieures) immédiatement après le traitement avec un masque facial par rapport à une absence de traitement. Les données regroupées montraient une DM d’ANB statistiquement significative en faveur du masque facial de 3,93 ° (IC à 95% 3,46 à 4,39; valeur P < 0,0001). Il y avait une hétérogénéité significative entre ces études (I 2 =82%). Ceci est susceptible d’être dû aux différentes populations étudiées et aux différents âges lors du traitement.

Une étude (n =73, preuves de faible qualité) rapportait des résultats comparant l’utilisation du masque facial par rapport à un témoin non traité au bout de trois ans de suivi. Cette étude a montré que les améliorations d’overjet et d’ANB étaient toujours présentes trois ans après le traitement. Dans cette étude, les effets indésirables étaient rapportés, mais en raison de la faible prévalence des signes et des symptômes de l’articulation temporo-mandibulaire (ATM), aucune analyse n'a été réalisée.

Deux études (n =90, preuves de faible qualité) comparaient la fronde mentonnière à une absence de traitement. Les deux études rapportaient une amélioration statistiquement significative d’ANB et une étude a également révélé une amélioration de l'évaluation Wits. Les données issues de ces deux études n'étaient pas éligibles pour être regroupées.

Une étude unique du tandem traction bow appliance par rapport à l'absence de traitement (n =30, preuves de qualité très médiocre) montrait une différence statistiquement significative de l’overjet et de l’ANB en faveur du groupe d'intervention.

Les deux autres études ne rapportaient pas le résultat principal de cette revue.

Conclusions des auteurs

Sur le court terme, il existe certaines preuves que l'utilisation d'un masque facial pour corriger des dents avant inférieures proéminentes chez les enfants soit efficace, ceci par rapport à l'absence de traitement. Cependant, compte tenu que les études incluses étaient généralement de faible qualité, ces résultats doivent être interprétés avec prudence. D’autres essais contrôlés randomisés avec un suivi à long terme sont nécessaires.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Traitement orthodontique chez les enfants présentant des dents avant inférieures proéminentes (malocclusion de classe III)

Traitement chez les enfants présentant des dents avant inférieures proéminentes

Question de la revue

Il existe de nombreuses méthodes différentes pour traiter les patients présentant des dents avant inférieures proéminentes (ou avancées). Le traitement orthodontique pour les enfants et les adolescents est une méthode utilisée. Cette revue, menée par les auteurs du groupe Cochrane sur la santé bucco-dentaire, a cherché à établir le type de traitement orthodontique le plus efficace lorsqu' il est pratiqué chez l'enfant; si ces traitements réduisent le recours à un traitement à l’âge adulte; et à quel âge ces traitements sont préférables afin de garantir que les changements apportés à la forme de la mâchoire et que le positionnement des dents perdurent jusqu' à la fin de la croissance et puissent être maintenu à l'âge adulte.

Dans les cas sévères, les personnes peuvent nécessiter une intervention chirurgicale similaire à celle de l'adulte pour corriger cette affection. Si une approche efficace pour le traitement pendant l'enfance était découverte, avec des effets durables, ce type de chirurgie ne serait peut-être pas nécessaire. De plus, le risque de lésions au niveau des dents et des articulations, ainsi que les effets psychologiques associés à cette condition, pourraient être diminués ou évités.

Contexte

Des dents avant inférieures proéminentes peuvent être un problème majeur pour certains patients, ceci est généralement dû à la manière dont les mâchoires se rejoignent. Cette condition peut être source de moqueries, de problèmes d’alimentation et parfois de problèmes d’élocution. Ultérieurement, elle peut également engendrer des problèmes au niveau des articulations de la mâchoire. Le traitement orthodontique requiert l'utilisation de différents types d'appareils, soit à l'intérieur, soit à l'extérieur de la bouche et qui sont fixés aux dents d’une certaine manière, ils sont également parfois placés sur des parties de la tête pour influer la croissance de la mâchoire et la position des dents.

Cette revue a examiné l'utilisation de quatre différents types de traitement orthodontique pour corriger des dents avant inférieures proéminentes chez les enfants.

-Masque facial : appareil qui repose sur le front et sur le menton, il est relié aux dents supérieures avec des bandes élastiques placées par le porteur. Du fait de cette installation, une force équilibrée est appliquée, en espérant exercer une traction des dents et de la mâchoire supérieures vers le bas et vers l’avant pour corriger les dents inférieures proéminentes.

-Fronde mentonnière : appareil qui repose sur le menton, avec une sangle autour de la tête. La croissance de la mâchoire inférieure vers l’avant est mobilisée, corrigeant la proéminence des dents avant inférieures. Rien n’est placé dans la bouche.

-Casque mandibulaire : une sangle, qui repose à l’arrière de la tête, est reliée aux dents inférieures. Cela mobilise la croissance vers l’avant des dents et de la mâchoire inferieures pour corriger la proéminence des dents avant inférieures.

-Tandem traction bow appliance (appareil d’expansion fixe pour l’arcade supérieure): des attaches sont fixées aux dents supérieures et inférieures. Des crochets latéraux sont situés sur de l’attache supérieure. Une barre en métal est placée sur l'attache inférieure et positionnée devant les dents inférieures. Une bande élastique peut par la suite être placée sur chaque côté pour exercer une traction vers l’avant de la mâchoire supérieure et une traction vers l’arrière de la mâchoire inférieure, ceci pour corriger les dents inférieures proéminentes.

Les caractéristiques de l'étude

Les preuves sur lesquelles se base cette revue se sont révélées être à jour en date du 7 janvier 2013.

Un total de sept études éligibles ont été identifiées et inclues dans cette revue; elles incluaient 339 enfants âgés de 5 à 11 ans. Dans chaque étude, le nombre égal de filles et de garçons était approximativement égal et les participants provenaient de différents groupes ethniques selon le lieu où l'étude a été réalisée. Les études incluses ont été réalisées en Turquie, en Egypte, en Chine, aux États-Unis et au Royaume-Uni.

Résultats principaux

Cette revue a trouvé certaines preuves que l'utilisation d'un masque facial peut aider à corriger des dents avant inférieures proéminentes sur le court terme. Il n'y avait pas de preuve disponible pour démontrer si ces changements sur le court terme étaient maintenus une fois la croissance de l'enfant terminée. Il n'y avait pas suffisamment de preuves pour recommander tout autre type de traitement pour les dents avant inférieures proéminentes.

Qualité des preuves

La qualité des preuves de l'utilisation d'un masque facial était de faible à modérée, alors que la qualité des autres preuves était très faible.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 10th December, 2013
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Minist�re en charge de la Sant�