Intervention Review

Antiretrovirals for reducing the risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV infection

  1. Nandi Siegfried1,*,
  2. Lize van der Merwe2,
  3. Peter Brocklehurst3,
  4. Tin Tin Sint4

Editorial Group: Cochrane HIV/AIDS Group

Published Online: 6 JUL 2011

Assessed as up-to-date: 17 JAN 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003510.pub3

How to Cite

Siegfried N, van der Merwe L, Brocklehurst P, Sint TT. Antiretrovirals for reducing the risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV infection. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 7. Art. No.: CD003510. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003510.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Cape Town, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, Cape Town, South Africa

  2. 2

    Medical Research Council, Biostatistics Unit, Cape Town, Cape Province, South Africa

  3. 3

    University of Oxford, National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit, Headington, Oxford, UK

  4. 4

    World Health Organization, Department of HIV/AIDS, Geneva, Switzerland

*Nandi Siegfried, Department of Public Health and Primary Health Care, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. nandi.siegfried@gmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (conclusions changed)
  2. Published Online: 6 JUL 2011

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Antiretroviral drugs reduce viral replication and can reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV either by lowering plasma viral load in pregnant women or through post-exposure prophylaxis in their newborns. In rich countries, highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) which usually comprises three drugs, has reduced the mother-to-child transmission rates to around 1-2%, but HAART is not always available in low- and middle-income countries. In these countries, various simpler and less costly antiretroviral regimens have been offered to pregnant women or to their newborn babies, or to both.

Objectives

To determine whether, and to what extent, antiretroviral regimens aimed at decreasing the risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV infection achieve a clinically useful decrease in transmission risk, and what effect these interventions have on maternal and infant mortality and morbidity.

Search methods

We sought to identify all relevant studies regardless of language or publication status by searching the Cochrane HIV/AIDS Review Group Trials Register, The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE and AIDSearch and relevant conference abstracts. We also contacted research organizations and experts in the field for unpublished and ongoing studies. The original review search strategy was conducted in 2002 and updated in 2006 and again in 2009.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials of any antiretroviral regimen aimed at decreasing the risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV infection compared with placebo or no treatment, or compared with another antiretroviral regimen.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently selected relevant studies, extracted data and assessed trial quality. For the primary outcomes, we used survival analysis to estimate the probability of infants being infected with HIV (the observed proportion) at various specific time-points and calculated efficacy at a specific time as the relative reduction in the proportion infected. Efficacy, at a specific time, is defined as the preventive fraction in the exposed group compared to the reference group, which is the relative reduction in the proportion infected: 1-(Re/Rf). For those studies where efficacy and hence confidence intervals were not calculated, we calculated the approximate confidence intervals for the efficacy using recommended methods. For analysis of results that are not based on survival analyses we present the relative risk for each trial outcome based on the number randomised. No meta-analysis was conducted as no trial assessed identical drug regimens.

Main results

Twenty-five trials including 18,901 participants with a median trial sample size of 627 ranging from 50 to 1,844 participants were included in this update. Twenty-two trials randomised mothers (18 pre-natally and four in labour) and followed up their infants, and three trials randomised infants. The first trial began in April 1991 and assessed zidovudine (ZDV) versus placebo and since then, the type, dosage and duration of drugs to be compared has been modified in each subsequent trial. We present the results stratified by regimen and type of feeding.

Antiretrovirals versus placebo

In breastfeeding populations, three trials found that:

ZDV given to mothers from 36 to 38 weeks gestation, during labour and for 7 days after delivery significantly reduced HIV infection at 4-8 weeks (Efficacy 32.00%; 95% CI 1.50 to 62.50), 3 to 4 months (Efficacy 33.07%; 95% CI 5.57 to 60.57), 6 months (Efficacy 34.55%; 95% CI 9.05 to 60.05), 12 months (Efficacy 34.31%; 95% CI 9.30 to 59.32) and 18 months (Efficacy 29.74%; 95% CI 2.73 to 56.75).

ZDV given to mothers from 36 weeks gestation and during labour significantly reduced HIV infection at 4 to 8 weeks (Efficacy 43.78%; 95% CI 8.78 to 78.78) and 3 to 4 months (Efficacy 36.95%; 95% CI 2.94 to 70.96) but not at birth.

ZDV plus lamivudine (3TC) given to mothers from 36 weeks gestation, during labour and for 7 days after delivery and to babies for the first 7 days after birth (PETRA 'regimen A') significantly reduced HIV infection (Efficacy 62.75%; 95% CI 40.76 to 84.74) and a combined endpoint of HIV infection or death (Efficacy 62.75 [, ]61.00%; 95% CI 40.76 to 84.74) at 4 to 8 weeks but these effects were not sustained at 18 months.

ZDV plus 3TC given to mothers from the start of labour until 7 days after delivery and to babies for the first 7 days after birth (PETRA 'regimen B') significantly reduced HIV infection (Efficacy 41.83%; 95% CI 12.82 to 70.84) and HIV infection or death at 4 to 8 weeks (Efficacy 35.91%; 95% CI 8.41 to 63.41) but the effects were not sustained at 18 months.

ZDV plus 3TC given to mothers during labour only (PETRA 'regimen C') with no treatment to babies did not reduce the risk of HIV infection at either 4 to 8 weeks or 18 months.

In non-breastfeeding populations, three trials found that:

ZDV given to mothers from 14 to 34 weeks gestation and during labour and to babies for the first 6 weeks after birth significantly reduced HIV infection in babies at 18 months (Efficacy 66.22%; 95% CI 33.94 to 98.50).

ZDV given to mothers from 36 weeks gestation and during labour with no treatment to babies ('Thai-CDC regimen') significantly reduced HIV infection at 4 to 8 weeks (Efficacy 50.26%; 95% CI 13.80 to 86.72) but not at birth

ZDV given to mothers from 38 weeks gestation and during labour with no treatment to babies did not influence HIV transmission at 6 months.

Longer versus shorter regimens using the same antiretrovirals

One trial in a breastfeeding population found that:

ZDV given to mothers during labour and to their babies for the first 3 days after birth compared with ZDV given to mothers from 36 weeks and during labour (similar to 'Thai-CDC') resulted in HIV infection rates that were not significantly different at birth, 4-8 weeks, 3 to 4 months, 6 months and 12 months.

Three trials in non-breastfeeding populations found that:

ZDV given to mothers from 28 weeks gestation during labour and to infants for the first 3 days after birth compared with ZDV given to mothers from 35 weeks gestation through labour and to infants from birth to 6 weeks significantly reduced HIV infection rate at 6 months (Efficacy 45.35 %; 95% CI 1.39 to 89.31) but compared with the same regimen ZDV given to mothers from 28 weeks gestation through labour and to infants from birth to 6 weeks did not result in a statistically significant difference in HIV infection at 6 months. ZDV given to mothers from 35 weeks gestation during labour and to infants for the first 3 days after birth was considered ineffective for reducing transmission rates and this regimen was discontinued.

An antenatal/intrapartum course of ZDV used for a median of 76 days compared with an antenatal/intrapartum ZDV regimen used for a median 28 days with no treatment to babies in either group did not result in HIV infection rates that were significantly different at birth and at 3 to 4 months.

In a programme where mothers were routinely receiving ZDV in the third trimester of pregnancy and babies were receiving one week of ZDV therapy, a single dose of nevirapine (NVP) given to mothers in labour and to their babies soon after birth compared with a single dose of NVP given to mothers only resulted in HIV infection rates that were not significantly different at birth and 6 months. However the reduction in risk of HIV infection or death at 6 months was marginally significant (Efficacy 45.00%; 95% CI -4.00 to 94.00).

Antiretroviral regimens using different drugs and durations of treatment

In breastfeeding populations, three trials found that:

A single dose of NVP given to mothers at the onset of labour plus a single dose of NVP given to their babies immediately after birth ('HIVNET 012 regimen') compared with ZDV given to mothers during labour and to their babies for a week after birth resulted in lower HIV infection rates at 4-8 weeks (Efficacy 41.00%; 95% CI 11.84 to 70.16), 3-4 months (Efficacy 38.91%; 95% CI 11.24 to 66.58), 12 months (Efficacy 35.98 [9.25, 62.71]36.00%; 95% CI 8.56 to 63.44) and 18 months (Efficacy 39.15%; 95% CI 13.81 to 64.49). In addition, the NVP regimen significantly reduced the risk of HIV infection or death at 4-8 weeks (Efficacy 41.74%; 95% CI 14.30 to 69.18), 3 to 4 months (Efficacy 40.00%; 95% CI 14.34 to 65.66), 12 months (Efficacy 32.17%; 95% CI 8.51 to 55.83) and 18 months (Efficacy 32.57 [9.93, 55.21]33.00%; 95% CI 9.93 to 55.21).

The 'HIVNET 012 regimen' plus ZDV given to babies for 1 week after birth compared with the 'HIVNET 012 regimen' alone did not result in a statistically significant difference in HIV infection at 4 to 8 weeks.

A single dose of NVP given to babies immediately after birth plus ZDV given to babies for 1 week after birth compared with a single dose of NVP given to babies only significantly reduced the HIV infection rate at 4 to 8 weeks (Efficacy 36.79%; 95% CI 3.57 to 70.01).

Five trials in non-breastfeeding populations found that:

In a population in which mothers were receiving 'standard' antiretroviral for HIV infection a single dose of NVP given to mothers in labour plus a single dose of NVP given to babies immediately after birth ('HIVNET 012 regimen') compared with placebo did not result in a statistically significant difference in HIV infection rates at birth and at 4 to 8 weeks.

The 'Thai CDC regimen' compared with the 'HIVNET 012 regimen' did not result in a significant difference in HIV infection at 4 to 8 weeks.

A single dose of NVP given to babies immediately after birth compared to ZDV given to babies for the first 6 weeks after birth did not result in a significant difference in HIV infection rates at 4-8 weeks and 3 to 4 months.

ZDV plus 3TC given to mothers in labour and for a week after delivery and to their infants for a week after birth (similar to 'PETRA regimen B') compared with NVP given to mothers in labour and immediately after delivery plus a single dose of NVP to their babies immediately after birth (similar to 'HIVNET 012 regimen') did not result in a significant difference in the HIV infection rate at 4 to 8 weeks.

An evaluation of various antiretroviral drugs given to mothers from 34 to 36 weeks and during labour with the same drugs given to their babies for 6 weeks after birth: stavudine (d4T) versus ZDV, didanosine (ddI) versus ZDV and d4T plus ddI versus ZDV did not result in statistically important differences in HIV infection rates at birth, 4 to 8 weeks, 3 to 4 months and 6 months.

TRIPLE regimens versus other

Two trials compared a regimen of three antiretrovirals given to the mother, which we refer to as TRIPLE, with other regimens.

In a breastfeeding population, a trial of TRIPLE regimen commenced at 34 weeks compared with only ZDV for the same period until labour when sdNVP was added found no babies infected with HIV at birth in either group and at 6 months post delivery there was no statistically significant difference in HIV infection between groups (Efficacy -84.62%, 95%CI: -490.35 to 321.11). The infants in the TRIPLE group did not receive any drugs while those in the ZDV group received sdNVP at birth.

In a non-breastfeeding population, a trial compared a protease inhibitor-based TRIPLE regimen combination of lopinavir/ritonavir, ZDV and lamivudine from 26 to 34 weeks gestation through 6 months post-partum with a shorter regimen of ZDV from 28 to 36 weeks, then ZDV and 3TC and sdNVP at onset of labour, followed by ZDV and 3TC for one week after delivery. Infants in both groups received sdNVP within 72 hours of delivery and ZDV for one week. There was no statistically significant difference between groups in HIV infection at birth (Efficacy 18.18%, 95%CI -83.48 to 119.84) or at four to eight weeks (Efficacy 31.25%, 95%CI -29.29 to 91.79). At six months, HIV infection was higher but not statistically significantly so in the non-TRIPLE group (Efficacy 42.35%, 95%CI -0.57 to 85.27). At 12 months HIV infection was statistically significantly higher in the non-TRIPLE group (Efficacy = 42.11%, 95%CI 0.66 to 83.56). At 6 months, the HIV infection or death incidence remained higher in the non-TRIPLE group (RR 34.13, 95%CI [-0.29 to 68.55) and at 12 months this difference was statistically significant (RR 36.20, 95%CI 5.92 to 66.48).

TRIPLE regimen versus TRIPLE regimen

In a breastfeeding population, one trial compared two triple combination antiretroviral regimens with each other, viz abacavir, lamivudine and ZDV with lopinavir/ritonavir and ZDV and lamivudine in the mother from 26 to 34 weeks and continued for six months post-partum. Infants in both groups received sdNVP and one month of ZDV. This trial found no significant difference in HIV infection rates at birth (Efficacy -189.47%; 95%CI -715.29 to 336.35) with incidence at six months remaining non-significant with transmission rates being very low (< 1%).

Adverse effects

The incidence of serious or life-threatening events was not significantly different in any of the trials included in this review.

Authors' conclusions

A regimen combining triple antiretrovirals is most effective for preventing transmission of HIV from mothers to babies. The risk of adverse events to both mother and baby appears low in the short-term but the optimal antiretroviral combination and the optimal time to initiate this to maximise prevention efficacy without compromising the health of either mother or baby remains unclear.

Short courses of antiretroviral drugs are also effective for reducing mother-to-child transmission of HIV and are not associated with any safety concerns in the short-term. ZDV given to mothers during the antenatal period, followed by ZDV+3TC intrapartum and postpartum for one week, and sd-NVP given to infants within 72 hours of delivery and ZDV for one week, may be most effective when considering short antiretroviral courses. Where HIV-infected women present late for delivery, post-exposure prophylaxis with a single dose of NVP immediately after birth plus ZDV for the first 6 weeks after birth is beneficial. The long term implications of the emergence of resistant mutations following the use of these regimens, especially those containing Nevirapine, require further study.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Antiretrovirals for reducing the risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV infection

At the end of 2009, 2.5 million children under the age of 15 years were estimated to be living with HIV/AIDS (WHO 2011). The majority of these children acquired their infections as a result of mother-to-child transmission during pregnancy, labor, or breastfeeding. Antiretroviral drugs administered to the HIV-infected mother and/or to her child during pregnancy, labor, or breastfeeding can reduce mother-to-child transmission of HIV. The objective of this review is to determine whether a regimen of antiretroviral drugs leads to a significant reduction in HIV transmission during pregnancy and labor without serious side-effects.

The 25 trials found eligible for this review included 18,901 participants.The included trials compared the use of antiretrovirals versus placebo, longer regimens versus shorter regimens using the same antiretrovirals, and antiretroviral regimens using different drugs and drug combinations. This review of trials found that short courses of certain antiretroviral drugs are effective in reducing mother-to-child transmission of HIV, but are not associated with any safety concerns in the short term.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Antirétroviraux visant à réduire le risque de transmission mère-enfant du VIH

Contexte

Les médicaments antirétroviraux réduisent la réplication virale et peuvent réduire la transmission mère-enfant du VIH soit en diminuant la charge virale plasmatique chez les femmes enceintes, soit à travers une prophylaxie post-exposition chez leurs nouveau-nés. Dans les pays riches, le traitement antirétroviral hautement actif (TAHA), comprenant généralement trois médicaments, a réduit les taux de transmission mère-enfant d'approximativement 1-2 %, mais le TAHA n'est pas toujours disponible dans les pays à faible et moyen revenus. Dans ces pays, des traitements variés plus simples et à coût moindre ont été offerts aux femmes enceintes ou à leurs nouveau-nés, voire aux deux.

Objectifs

Déterminer si, et dans quelle mesure, les traitements antirétroviraux visant à diminuer le risque de transmission mère-enfant du VIH atteignent une réduction clinique utile du risque de transmission, et quels sont les effets de ces interventions sur la mortalité et la morbidité maternelles et infantiles.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons tenu à identifier toutes les études pertinentes quels que soient le langage ou l'état de publication en recherchant le registre d’essais cliniques Cochrane spécialisé dans le VIH/SIDA, Bibliothèque Cochrane, MEDLINE, EMBASE et AIDSearch, ainsi que tous les résumés de conférence pertinents. Nous avons également contacté des organisations de chercheurs et des experts travaillant dans le domaine pour obtenir des essais non publiés et des études en cours. La stratégie de recherche documentaire a été initialement conduite en 2002 puis mise à jour en 2006 et en 2009.

Critères de sélection

Essais contrôlés randomisés des traitements antirétroviraux visant à réduire le risque de transmission mère-enfant du VIH par rapport à un placebo ou sans traitement, ou par rapport à un autre traitement antirétroviral.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont sélectionné indépendamment les études pertinentes, extrait les données et évalué la qualité des essais. Pour les critères de jugement principaux, nous avons utilisé une analyse de survie afin d'estimer la probabilité pour les nourrissons d'être infectés par le VIH (la proportion observée) à divers points temporels, et avons calculé l'efficacité à un moment précis comme réduction relative de la proportion infectée. L'efficacité à un moment précis est définie comme la fraction préventive au sein du groupe exposé par rapport au groupe de référence, c'est à dire la réduction relative de la proportion infectée : 1-(Re/Rf). Pour les études dans lesquelles l'efficacité et donc les intervalles de confiance n'ont pas été calculés, nous avons calculé les intervalles de confiance approximatifs pour mesurer l'efficacité à l'aide des méthodes recommandées. Pour les analyses de résultats qui ne sont pas basées sur les analyses de survie, nous présentons le risque relatif pour chaque critère d'essai, basé sur le nombre randomisé. Aucune méta-analyse n'a été conduite puisqu'aucun essai n'a évalué des traitements de médicaments identiques.

Résultats Principaux

Vingt-cinq essais comprenant 18 901 participants avec une taille d'échantillon médiane de 627, allant de 50 à 1 844 participants, ont été inclus dans cette mise à jour. Vingt-deux essais ont randomisé les mères (18 en phase prénatale et quatre en phase de travail) et suivi leurs nourrissons, et trois essais ont randomisé les nourrissons. Le premier essai a commencé en avril 1991 et a évalué la zidovudine (ZDV) par rapport à un placebo et, depuis, le type, le dosage et la durée des médicaments à comparer a été modifiée dans chaque essai postérieur. Nous présentons les résultats classés par traitement et type d'alimentation.

Antirétroviraux par rapport à un placebo

Chez les populations ayant recours à l'allaitement, trois essais ont observé que :

La ZDV administrée aux mères en gestation de 36 à 38 semaines, pendant le travail et 7 jours après l'accouchement, a réduit de manière significative l'infection par le VIH à 4-8 semaines (Efficacité de 32,00 % ; IC à 95 % de 1,50 à 62,50), 3 à 4 mois (Efficacité de 33,07 % ; IC à 95 % de 5,57 à 60,57), 6 mois (Efficacité de 34,55 % ; IC à 95 %, de 9,05 à 60,05), 12 mois (Efficacité de 34,31 % IC à 95 % de 9,30 à 59,32) et 18 mois (Efficacité de 29,74 % ; IC à 95% entre 2,73 et 56,75).

La ZDV administrée aux mères en gestation de 36 semaines et pendant le travail a réduit de manière significative l'infection par le VIH à 4 à 8 semaines (Efficacité de 43,78 % ; IC à 95 % de 8,78 à 78,78) et 3 à 4 mois (Efficacité de 36,95 % ; IC à 95 % de 2,94 à 70,96), mais pas à la naissance.

Le traitement de ZDV plus lamivudine (3TC) administré aux mères en gestation de 36 semaines, pendant le travail ou bien 7 jours après l'accouchement, ainsi qu'aux bébés lors des 7 premiers jours suivant la naissance (traitement A PETRA), a réduit de manière significative l'infection par le VIH (Efficacité de 62,75 % ; IC à 95 % de 40,76 à 84,74) et un critère de jugement combiné de l'infection par le VIH ou le décès (Efficacité de 62,75 [, ]61,00 % ; IC à 95 %, entre 40,76 et 84,74), à 4 à 8 semaines, mais ces effets n'ont pas perduré à 18 mois.

Le traitement de ZDV plus 3TC administré aux mères du début du travail jusqu'à 7 jours après l'accouchement, ainsi qu'aux bébés pour les 7 premiers jours suivant la naissance (traitement B PETRA), a réduit de manière significative l'infection par le VIH (Efficacité de 41,83 % ; IC à 95 % de 12,82 à 70,84) et l'infection par le VIH ou le décès) 4 à 8 semaines (Efficacité de 35,91 % ; IC à 95 % de 8,41 à 63,41), mais ces effets n'ont pas perduré à 18 mois.

Le traitement de ZDV plus 3TC administré aux mères durant le travail uniquement (traitement C PETRA) et sans aucun traitement administré aux bébés n'a pas réduit le risque d'infection par le VIH à 4 à 8 semaines ou à 18 mois.

Au sein des populations n'ayant pas recours à l'allaitement, trois essais ont observé que :

La ZDV administrée aux mères en gestation de 14 à 34 semaines et pendant le travail, ainsi qu'aux bébés pour les 6 premières semaines suivant la naissance, a réduit de manière significative l'infection par le VIH chez les bébés à 18 mois (Efficacité 66,22 % ; IC à 95% entre 33,94 et 98,50).

La ZDV administrée aux mères en gestation de 36 semaines et pendant le travail, sans aucun traitement administré aux bébés (traitement Thai-CDC), a réduit de manière significative l'infection par le VIH à 4 à 8 semaines (Efficacité 50,26 % ; IC à 95 %, de 13,80 à 86,72), mais pas à la naissance

La ZDV administrée aux mères en gestation de 38 semaines et pendant le travail, sans aucun traitement administré aux bébés, n'a pas influencé la transmission du VIH à 6 mois.

Traitements longs versus traitement courts avec les mêmes antirétroviraux

Un essai réalisé au sein d'une population ayant recours à l'allaitement a observé que :

La ZDV administrée aux mères pendant le travail ainsi qu'aux bébés pour les 3 premiers jours suivant la naissance, par rapport à la ZDV administrée aux mères en gestation de 36 semaines et pendant le travail (similaire au traitement Thai-CDC), a obtenu des taux d'infection par le VIH qui n'étaient pas significativement différents à la naissance, 4 à 8 semaines, 3 à 4 mois, 6 mois et 12 mois.

Trois essais réalisés au sein de populations n'ayant pas recours à l'allaitement ont observé que :

La ZDV administrée aux mères en gestation de 28 semaines, pendant le travail, ainsi qu'aux bébés pour les 3 premiers jours suivant la naissance, par rapport à la ZDV administrée aux mères en gestations de 35 semaines jusqu'au travail, ainsi qu'aux nourrissons de la naissance à 6 semaines, a réduit de manière significative les taux d'infection par le VIH à 6 mois (Efficacité de 45,35 % ; IC à 95 % de 1,39 à 89,31), mais par rapport au même traitement, la ZDV administrée aux mères en gestation de 28 semaines jusqu'au travail, ainsi qu'aux nourrissons de la naissance à 6 semaines, n'a pas obtenu de différence statistique significative concernant l'infection par le VIH à 6 mois. La ZDV administrée aux mères en gestation de 35 semaines pendant le travail, ainsi qu'aux nourrissons pour les 3 premiers jours suivant la naissance, a été considérée inefficace dans la réduction des taux de transmission et ce traitement a été arrêté.

Un traitement prénatal/intrapartum de ZDV utilisé pour un nombre médian de 76 jours, par rapport à un traitement prénatal/intrapartum utilisé pour un nombre médian de 28 jours et sans aucun traitement pour les bébés de chaque groupe, n'a pas obtenu de taux d'infection par le VIH significativement différents à la naissance ainsi qu'à 3 à 4 mois.

Dans un programme au cours duquel les mères recevaient de la ZDV de manière régulière lors du troisième trimestre de grossesse et où les bébés recevaient un traitement de ZDV d'une semaine, une dose unique de névirapine (NVP) administrée aux mères durant le travail ainsi qu'à leurs bébés directement après la naissance, par rapport à une dose unique de NVP administrée aux mères, a seulement obtenu des taux d'infection par le VIH qui n'étaient pas significativement différents à la naissance et à 6 mois. Néanmoins, la réduction du risque d'infection par le VIH ou de décès à 6 mois a été marginalement significative (Efficacité de 45,00 % ; IC à 95% entre -4,00 et 94,00).

Traitements antirétroviraux utilisant différents médicaments et durées

Au sein de populations ayant recours à l'allaitement, trois essais ont observé que :

Une dose unique de NVP administrée aux mères au début du travail plus une dose de NVP administrée à leurs bébés immédiatement après la naissance (traitement HIVNET 012), par rapport à de la ZDV administrée aux mères durant le travail et à leurs bébés pour une semaine après la naissance, a obtenu des taux d'infection par le VIH plus faibles à 4 à 8 semaines (Efficacité de 41,00 % ; IC à 95 % de 11,84 à 70,16), 3 à 4 mois (Efficacité de 38,91 % ; IC à 95 %, de 11,24 à 66,58), 12 mois (Efficacité de 35,98 % [9,25, 62,71]36,00 % ; IC à 95%, de 8,56 à 63,44) et 18 mois (Efficacité de 39,15% ; IC à 95% de 13,81 à 64,49). De plus, le traitement de NVP a réduit de manière significative le risque d'infection par le VIH ou de décès à 4-8 semaines (Efficacité de 41,74 % ; IC à 95% de 14,30 à 69,18), 3 à 4 mois (Efficacité de 40,00% ; IC à 95 %, de 14,34 à 65,66), 12 mois (Efficacité de 32,17 % IC à 95 % de 8,51 à 55,83) et 18 mois (Efficacité de 32,57 % [9,93 ; 55,21]33,00 % ; IC à 95% entre 9,93 et 55,21).

Le traitement HIVNET 012 plus ZDV administré aux bébés pour une semaine après la naissance, par rapport au traitement HIVNET 012 seul, n'a pas obtenu de différence statistique significative concernant l'infection par le VIH à 4 à 8 semaines.

Une dose unique de NVP administrée aux bébés immédiatement après la naissance plus de la ZDV administrée aux bébés pour 1 semaine suivant la naissance, par rapport à une dose unique de NVP administrée aux bébés, a seulement réduit de manière significative le taux d'infection par le VIH à 4 à 8 semaines (Efficacité de 36,79 % ; IC à 95% entre 3,57 et 70,01).

Cinq essais réalisés au sein de populations n'ayant pas recours à l'allaitement ont observé que :

Au sein d'une population dans laquelle les mères ont reçu un antirétroviral standard pour le traitement de l'infection par le VIH, une dose unique de NVP administrée aux mères pendant le travail plus une dose unique de NVP administrée aux bébés immédiatement après la naissance (traitement HIVNET 012), par rapport à un placebo, n'a pas obtenu de différence statistiquement significative concernant les taux d'infection par le VIH à la naissance et à 4 à 8 semaines.

Le traitement Thai CDC, par rapport au HIVNET 012, n'a pas obtenu de différence significative concernant l'infection par le VIH à 4 à 8 semaines.

Une dose unique de NVP administrée aux bébés immédiatement après la naissance, par rapport à de la ZDV administrée aux bébés pour les 6 premières semaines suivant la naissance, n'a pas obtenu de différence significative des taux d'infection par le VIH à 4-8 semaines et à 3 à 4 mois.

Le traitement de ZDV plus 3TC administré aux mères pendant le travail et pour une semaine après l'accouchement, ainsi qu'à leurs nourrissons pour une semaine suivant la naissance (similaire au traitement B PETRA), par rapport à de la NVP administrée aux mères pendant le travail et immédiatement après l'accouchement plus une dose unique de NVP administrée à leurs bébés immédiatement après la naissance (similaire au traitement HIVNET 012), n'a pas obtenu de différence significative des taux d'infection par le VIH à 4 à 8 semaines.

Une évaluation de divers médicaments antirétroviraux administrés aux mères en gestation de 34 à 36 semaines et pendant le travail, également administrés à leurs bébés pour 6 semaines après la naissance : stavudine (d4T) versus ZDV, didanosine (ddI) versus ZDV et d4T plus ddI versus ZDV n'ont pas obtenu de différence statistique importante des taux d'infection par le VIH à la naissance, 4 à 8 semaines, 3 à 4 mois et 6 mois.

Trithérapies versus autres traitements

Deux essais ont comparé un traitement de trois antirétroviraux administrés aux mères, que nous appellerons TRIPLE, avec d'autres traitements.

Au sein d'une population ayant recours à l'allaitement, un essai de traitement TRIPLE débuté à 34 semaines et comparé à un traitement à base de ZDV uniquement pour la même période jusqu'au travail lorsqu'une dose unique de NVP était ajoutée, n'a identifié aucun bébé infecté par le VIH à la naissance dans les deux groupes. À 6 mois après l'accouchement, il n'y avait pas de différence statistiquement significative concernant l'infection par le VIH entre les groupes (Efficacité -84,62 %, IC à 95 % : -490,35 à 321,11). Les nourrissons du groupe TRIPLE n'ont pas reçu de médicament alors que ceux du groupe ZDV ont reçu une dose unique de NVP à la naissance.

Au sein d'une population n'ayant pas recours à l'allaitement, un essai a comparé un traitement TRIPLE à base d'inhibiteur de protéase d'une combinaison de lopinavir/ritonavir, ZDV et lamivudine de 26 à 34 semaines de gestation jusqu'à 6 mois post-partum avec un traitement plus court de ZDV à partir de 28 à 36 semaines, puis de la ZDV et 3TC ainsi qu'une dose unique de NVP au début du travail, suivis de ZDV et 3TC pour une semaine après l'accouchement. Les nourrissons des deux groupes ont reçu une dose unique de NVP dans les 72 heures après l'accouchement et de la ZDV pour une semaine. Aucune différence statistiquement significative n'était observée entre les groupes concernant l'infection par le VIH à la naissance (Efficacité 18,18 %, IC à 95 % de -83,48 à 119,84) ou à quatre à huit semaines (Efficacité de 31,25 %, IC à 95 % de -29,29 à 91,79). À six mois, l'infection par le VIH était plus élevée mais pas de manière statistiquement significative dans le groupe non-TRIPLE (Efficacité de 42,35 %, IC à 95 % de -0,57 à 85,27). À douze mois, l'infection par le VIH était plus élevée de manière statistiquement significative dans le groupe non-TRIPLE (Efficacité = 42,11 %, IC à 95 % de 0,66 à 83,56). À six mois, l'incidence d'infection par le VIH ou de décès est restée plus élevée dans le groupe non-TRIPLE (RR de 34,13, IC à 95 % de -0,29 à 68,55) et à 12 mois cette différence était statistiquement significative (RR de 36,20, IC à 95 % de 5,92 à 66,48).

Trithérapie versus trithérapie

Au sein d'une population ayant recours à l'allaitement, un essai a comparé deux combinaisons de trithérapies à base d'antirétroviraux, viz abacavir, lamivudine et ZDV avec lopinavir/ritonavir et ZDV et lamivudine chez la mère à partir de 26 à 34 semaines et continuées pour six mois post-partum. Les nourrissons des deux groupes ont reçu une dose unique de NVP et un mois de ZDV. Cet essai n'a observé aucune différence significative des taux d'infection par le VIH à la naissance (Efficacité de -189,47 % ; IC à 95 % de -715,29 à 336,35) avec une incidence à six mois restant non-significative et des taux de transmission très bas (< 1 %).

Effets indésirables

L'incidence d'événements sérieux ou mettant en jeu le pronostic vital n'était pas significativement différente dans les essais inclus dans cette revue.

Conclusions des auteurs

Un traitement combinant trois antirétroviraux est plus efficace dans la prévention de la transmission du VIH des mères vers les bébés. Le risque d'événements indésirables pour la mère et le bébé semble être bas dans le court terme, mais la combinaison antirétrovirale optimale et le temps de démarrage optimal pour maximiser l'efficacité de la prévention sans compromettre la santé de la mère ou du bébé ne sont pas clairement établis.

Les traitements antirétroviraux courts sont également efficaces dans la réduction de la transmission mère-enfant du VIH et ne sont pas associés à quelconque préoccupation de sûreté dans le court terme. La ZDV administrée aux mères durant la période prénatale, suivie de ZDV+3TC intrapartum et postpartum pour une semaine, ainsi qu'une dose unique de NVP administrée aux nourrissons dans les 72 heures suivant l'accouchement et de la ZDV pour une semaine, peuvent être plus efficaces en considération des traitements antirétroviraux courts. Lorsque des femmes infectées par le VIH se présentent tard pour l'accouchement, la prophylaxie post-exposition avec une dose unique de NVP immédiatement après la naissance plus de la ZDV pour les 6 premières semaines après la naissance sont bénéfiques. Les implications à long terme de l'émergence de mutations résistantes suivant l'utilisation de ces traitements, particulièrement ceux contenant de la névirapine, requièrent une étude approfondie.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Antirétroviraux visant à réduire le risque de transmission mère-enfant du VIH

Antirétroviraux visant à réduire le risque de transmission mère-enfant du VIH

À la fin de l'année 2009, on a estimé que 2,5 millions d'enfants âgés de moins de 15 ans vivaient avec le VIH/SIDA (WHO 2011). La majorité de ces enfants a été infectée des suites d'une transmission mère-enfant pendant la grossesse, l'accouchement ou l'allaitement. L'administration de médicaments antirétroviraux à la mère et/ou son enfant infectés par le VIH lors de la grossesse, l'accouchement ou l'allaitement, peut réduire la transmission mère-enfant du VIH. L'objectif de cette revue est de déterminer si un traitement à base de médicaments antirétroviraux peut mener à une réduction significative de la transmission du VIH lors de la grossesse et de l'accouchement sans effet secondaire important.

Les 25 essais considérés éligibles pour cette revue comportaient 18 901 participants. Les essais inclus comparaient l'utilisation de médicaments antirétroviraux par rapport à un placebo, des traitements plus longs par rapports à des traitements plus courts et basés sur les mêmes antirétroviraux, et des traitements antirétroviraux utilisant différents médicaments et différentes combinaisons de médicaments. Cette revue d'essais a observé que les traitements antirétroviraux courts sont efficaces dans la réduction de la transmission mère-enfant du VIH mais ne sont pas associés au moindre souci de sûreté dans le court terme.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st March, 2013
Traduction financée par: Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux