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Early skin-to-skin contact for mothers and their healthy newborn infants

  1. Elizabeth R Moore1,*,
  2. Gene C Anderson2,
  3. Nils Bergman3,
  4. Therese Dowswell4

Editorial Group: Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group

Published Online: 16 MAY 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 15 MAR 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003519.pub3


How to Cite

Moore ER, Anderson GC, Bergman N, Dowswell T. Early skin-to-skin contact for mothers and their healthy newborn infants. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 5. Art. No.: CD003519. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003519.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Vanderbilt University, School of Nursing, Nashville, Tennessee, USA

  2. 2

    Professor Emerita, University of Florida, Case Western Reserve University, Gainesville, FL, USA

  3. 3

    University of Cape Town, School of Child and Adolescent Health, and Department of Human Biology, Cape Town, South Africa

  4. 4

    The University of Liverpool, Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group, Department of Women's and Children's Health, Liverpool, UK

*Elizabeth R Moore, School of Nursing, Vanderbilt University, 314 Godchaux Hall, 21st Avenue South, Nashville, Tennessee, 37240-0008, USA. elizabeth.moore@vanderbilt.edu.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 16 MAY 2012

SEARCH

[Figure 1]
Figure 1. Risk of bias graph: review authors' judgements about each risk of bias item presented as percentages across all included studies.
[Figure 2]
Figure 2. Risk of bias summary: review authors' judgements about each risk of bias item for each included study.
[Figure 3]
Figure 3. Funnel plot of comparison: 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, outcome: 1.1 Breastfeeding 1 month to 4 months postbirth.
[Analysis 1.1]
Analysis 1.1. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 1 Breastfeeding 1 month to 4 months postbirth.
[Analysis 1.2]
Analysis 1.2. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 2 Duration of breastfeeding in days.
[Analysis 1.3]
Analysis 1.3. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 3 SCRIP score first 6 hours postbirth.
[Analysis 1.4]
Analysis 1.4. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 4 SCRIP score first 6 hours in newborns below 1800 g birthweight.
[Analysis 1.5]
Analysis 1.5. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 5 Blood glucose mg/dL and mmol/L at 75-90 minutes postbirth.
[Analysis 1.6]
Analysis 1.6. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 6 Infant axillary temperature 90 minutes to 2 hours postbirth.
[Analysis 1.7]
Analysis 1.7. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 7 Exclusive breastfeeding at hospital discharge.
[Analysis 1.8]
Analysis 1.8. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 8 Breastfeeding status day 28 to 1 month postbirth.
[Analysis 1.9]
Analysis 1.9. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 9 Exclusive breastfeeding up to 3-6 months postbirth.
[Analysis 1.10]
Analysis 1.10. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 10 Breastfeeding 1 year postbirth.
[Analysis 1.11]
Analysis 1.11. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 11 Success of the first breastfeeding (IBFAT score).
[Analysis 1.12]
Analysis 1.12. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 12 Successful first breastfeeding (IBFAT score 10-12 or BAT score 8-12).
[Analysis 1.13]
Analysis 1.13. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 13 Suckled during the first 2 hours postbirth.
[Analysis 1.14]
Analysis 1.14. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 14 Mean variation in maternal breast temp. 30-120 minutes postbirth.
[Analysis 1.15]
Analysis 1.15. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 15 Breast engorgement - pain, tension, hardness 3 days postbirth.
[Analysis 1.16]
Analysis 1.16. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 16 Heart rate 75 minutes to 2 hours postbirth.
[Analysis 1.17]
Analysis 1.17. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 17 Respiratory rate 75 minutes - 2 hours postbirth.
[Analysis 1.18]
Analysis 1.18. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 18 Infant did not exceed parameters for stability.
[Analysis 1.19]
Analysis 1.19. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 19 Transferred to the neonatal intensive care unit.
[Analysis 1.20]
Analysis 1.20. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 20 Infant body weight change (grams) day 14 postbirth.
[Analysis 1.22]
Analysis 1.22. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 22 Infant hospital length of stay in hours.
[Analysis 1.23]
Analysis 1.23. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 23 Not crying for > 1 minute during 90 minutes.
[Analysis 1.24]
Analysis 1.24. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 24 Amount of crying in minutes during a 75-minute observation period.
[Analysis 1.25]
Analysis 1.25. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 25 PCERA Maternal positive affective involvement and responsiveness 12 months postbirth.
[Analysis 1.26]
Analysis 1.26. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 26 PCERA Dydadic mutuality and reciprocity 12 months postbirth.
[Analysis 1.27]
Analysis 1.27. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 27 Maternal pain 4 hours postcesarean birth.
[Analysis 1.28]
Analysis 1.28. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 28 Mother's most certain preference for same postdelivery care in the future.
[Analysis 1.29]
Analysis 1.29. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 29 Maternal state anxiety day 3 postbirth.
[Analysis 1.30]
Analysis 1.30. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 30 Maternal parenting confidence at 1 month postbirth.
[Analysis 1.31]
Analysis 1.31. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 31 Breastfeeding 1 month to 4 months post birth: Sensitivity analysis.
[Analysis 1.32]
Analysis 1.32. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 32 Duration of breastfeeding in days: Sensitivity analysis.
[Analysis 1.33]
Analysis 1.33. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 33 Heart rate 75 minutes to 2 hrs post birth: Sensitivity analysis.
[Analysis 1.34]
Analysis 1.34. Comparison 1 Skin-to-skin versus standard contact healthy infants, Outcome 34 Respiratory rate 75 minutes to 2 hours post birth: Sensitivity analysis.