Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Interventions for protecting renal function in the perioperative period

  1. Mathew Zacharias1,*,
  2. Mohan Mugawar2,
  3. G Peter Herbison3,
  4. Robert J Walker4,
  5. Karen Hovhannisyan5,
  6. Pal Sivalingam6,
  7. Niamh P Conlon7

Editorial Group: Cochrane Anaesthesia Group

Published Online: 11 SEP 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 11 AUG 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003590.pub4

How to Cite

Zacharias M, Mugawar M, Herbison GP, Walker RJ, Hovhannisyan K, Sivalingam P, Conlon NP. Interventions for protecting renal function in the perioperative period. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 9. Art. No.: CD003590. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003590.pub4.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Dunedin Hospital, Department of Anaesthesia & Intensive Care, Dunedin, New Zealand

  2. 2

    St Vincent's University Hospital, Department of Anaesthesia and Intensive Care Medicine, Dublin, Ireland

  3. 3

    Dunedin School of Medicine, University of Otago, Department of Preventive & Social Medicine, Dunedin, New Zealand

  4. 4

    University of Otago, Department of Medicine, Dunedin, New Zealand

  5. 5

    Rigshospitalet, The Cochrane Anaesthesia Review Group, Copenhagen, Denmark

  6. 6

    Princess Alexandra Hospital, Department of Anaesthesia, Brisbane, Australia

  7. 7

    St Vincent's University Hospital, Department of Anaesthesia, Dublin, Ireland

*Mathew Zacharias, Department of Anaesthesia & Intensive Care, Dunedin Hospital, Great King Street, Dunedin, Private Bag 192, New Zealand. mathew.zacharias@otago.ac.nz. mzach@xtra.co.nz.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 11 SEP 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Various methods have been used to try to protect kidney function in patients undergoing surgery. These most often include pharmacological interventions such as dopamine and its analogues, diuretics, calcium channel blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), sodium bicarbonate, antioxidants and erythropoietin (EPO).

Objectives

This review is aimed at determining the effectiveness of various measures advocated to protect patients' kidneys during the perioperative period.

We considered the following questions: (1) Are any specific measures known to protect kidney function during the perioperative period? (2) Of measures used to protect the kidneys during the perioperative period, does any one method appear to be more effective than the others? (3) Of measures used to protect the kidneys during the perioperative period,does any one method appear to be safer than the others?

Search methods

In this updated review, we searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library, Issue 2, 2012), MEDLINE (Ovid SP) (1966 to August 2012) and EMBASE (Ovid SP) (1988 to August 2012). We originally handsearched six journals (Anesthesia and Analgesia, Anesthesiology, Annals of Surgery, British Journal of Anaesthesia, Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, and Journal of Vascular Surgery) (1985 to 2004). However, because these journals are properly indexed in MEDLINE, we decided to rely on electronic searches only without handsearching the journals from 2004 onwards.

Selection criteria

We selected all randomized controlled trials in adults undergoing surgery for which a treatment measure was used for the purpose of providing renal protection during the perioperative period.

Data collection and analysis

We selected 72 studies for inclusion in this review. Two review authors extracted data from all selected studies and entered them into RevMan 5.1; then the data were appropriately analysed. We performed subgroup analyses for type of intervention, type of surgical procedure and pre-existing renal dysfunction. We undertook sensitivity analyses for studies with high and moderately good methodological quality.

Main results

The updated review included data from 72 studies, comprising a total of 4378 participants. Of these, 2291 received some form of treatment and 2087 acted as controls. The interventions consisted most often of different pharmaceutical agents, such as dopamine and its analogues, diuretics, calcium channel blockers, ACE inhibitors, NAC, ANP, sodium bicarbonate, antioxidants and EPO or selected hydration fluids. Some clinical heterogeneity and varying risk of bias were noted amongst the studies, although we were able to meaningfully interpret the data. Results showed significant heterogeneity and indicated that most interventions provided no benefit.

Data on perioperative mortality were reported in 41 studies and data on acute renal injury in 44 studies (all interventions combined). Because of considerable clinical heterogeneity (different clinical scenarios, as well as considerable methodological variability amongst the studies), we did not perform a meta-analysis on the combined data.

Subgroup analysis of major interventions and surgical procedures showed no significant influence of interventions on reported mortality and acute renal injury. For the subgroup of participants who had pre-existing renal damage, the risk of mortality from 10 trials (959 participants) was estimated as odds ratio (OR) 0.76, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.38 to 1.52; the risk of acute renal injury (as reported in the trials) was estimated from 11 trials (979 participants) as OR 0.43, 95% CI 0.23 to 0.80. Subgroup analysis of studies that were rated as having low risk of bias revealed that 19 studies reported mortality numbers (1604 participants); OR was 1.01, 95% CI 0.54 to 1.90. Fifteen studies reported data on acute renal injury (criteria chosen by the individual studies; 1600 participants); OR was 1.03, 95% CI 0.54 to 1.97.

Authors' conclusions

No reliable evidence from the available literature suggests that interventions during surgery can protect the kidneys from damage. However, the criteria used to diagnose acute renal damage varied in many of the older studies selected for inclusion in this review, many of which suffered from poor methodological quality such as insufficient participant numbers and poor definitions of end points such as acute renal failure and acute renal injury. Recent methods of detecting renal damage such as the use of specific biomarkers and better defined criteria for identifying renal damage (RIFLE (risk, injury, failure, loss of kidney function and end-stage renal failure) or AKI (acute kidney injury)) may have to be explored further to determine any possible benefit derived from interventions used to protect the kidneys during the perioperative period.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

No evidence indicates that any of the measures used to protect patients' kidneys during the perioperative period are beneficial

The kidneys may be damaged during an operation as a result of direct and indirect insult. The reasons for this are multiple and include changes to physiology brought on by the surgery and by the body’s response to such insult. Damage to kidneys during the perioperative period is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. This updated Cochrane review looked at 72 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with 4378 participants (search data until August 2012); interventions most often included pharmacological interventions (administration of dopamine and its analogues, diuretics, calcium channel blockers, angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, N-acetyl cysteine, atrial natriuretic peptide, sodium bicarbonate, antioxidants and erythropoietin) or selected hydration fluids. We attempted to identify any possible damage to the kidneys by evaluating kidney function up to seven days after the operation.

No clear evidence from available RCTs suggests that any of the measures used to protect the kidneys during the perioperative period are beneficial. These findings held true in 14 studies of patients with pre-existing renal damage and in 24 studies that were considered of good methodological quality. The primary outcomes of these studies were mortality and acute renal injury. Reported mortality in studies with low risk of bias was not different between intervention and control groups (odds ratio (OR) 1.01, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.52 to 1.97) or for acute renal injury (OR 1.05, 95% CI 0.55 to 2.03). The summary of findings revealed a similar picture. So we conclude that evidence suggests that none of the interventions used currently are helpful in protecting the kidneys during the perioperative period, nor do they cause increased harm.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Les interventions pour protéger la fonction rénale dans la période périopératoire

Contexte

Différentes méthodes ont été utilisées pour tenter de protéger la fonction rénale chez les patients subissant une intervention chirurgicale. Elles comprennent le plus souvent des interventions pharmacologiques telles que dopamine et ses analogues, diurétiques, inhibiteurs des canaux calciques, inhibiteurs de l'enzyme de conversion de l'angiotensine (ECA), N-acétylcystéine (NAC), facteur natriurétique auriculaire (FNA), bicarbonate de sodium, antioxydants et érythropoïétine (EPO).

Objectifs

Cette revue vise à déterminer l'efficacité de diverses mesures préconisées pour protéger les reins des patients pendant la période périopératoire.

Nous avons pris en compte les questions suivantes: (1) Les mesures spécifiques connues pour protéger la fonction rénale fonctionnent elles au cours de la période périopératoire? (2) Parmi les mesures utilisées pour protéger les reins pendant la période périopératoire, est-ce qu'une des méthodes se révèle plus efficace que les autres? (3) Parmi les mesures utilisées pour protéger les reins pendant la période périopératoire, est-ce qu'une des méthodes se révèle plus sûre que les autres?

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Dans cette revue mise à jour, nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) ( La Bibliothèque Cochrane, numéro 2, 2012), MEDLINE (Ovid SP) (de 1966 à août 2012) et EMBASE (Ovid SP) (de 1988 à août 2012). A l'origine nous avions effectué une recherche manuelle dans six journaux (Anesthesia and Analgesia, Anesthesiology, Annals of Surgery, British Journal of Anaesthesia, Journal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery, Et Journal of Vascular Surgery) (De 1985 à 2004). Cependant, parce que ces revues sont correctement indexées dans MEDLINE, nous avons décidé de nous appuyer exclusivement sur des recherches électroniques sans recherche manuelle dans les revues postérieures à 2004.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons sélectionné tous les essais contrôlés randomisés chez les adultes subissant une chirurgie pour laquelle une mesure thérapeutique a été utilisée avec comme objectif de fournir une protection rénale pendant la période périopératoire.

Recueil et analyse des données

Nous avons sélectionné 72 études à inclure dans cette revue. Deux auteurs de la revue ont extrait les données de toutes les études sélectionnées et les ont saisies dans RevMan 5.1; ensuite les données ont été analysées de façon appropriée. Nous avons effectué des analyses en sous-groupe pour les types d'intervention, le type de procédure chirurgicale et la préexistence d'un dysfonctionnement rénal. Nous avons entrepris des analyses de sensibilité pour les études à qualité méthodologique élevée et moyenne.

Résultats Principaux

La revue mise à jour incluait les données de 72 études, comprenant un total de 4378 participants. Parmi eux, 2291 avaient reçu une forme de traitement et 2087 intervenaient comme témoins. Les interventions consistaient le plus souvent en différents agents pharmaceutiques, tels que dopamine et ses analogues, diurétiques, inhibiteurs des canaux calciques, inhibiteurs de l'ECA, NAC, FNA, bicarbonate de sodium, antioxydants et EPO ou liquides d'hydratation sélectionnés. Une certaine hétérogénéité clinique et des risques variables de biais ont été observés parmi les études, cependant nous avons pu interpréter utilement les données. Les résultats ont montré une hétérogénéité importante et ont indiqué que la plupart des interventions ne fournissaient pas de bénéfice.

Les données sur la mortalité périopératoire ont été rapportées dans 41 études et les données sur l'atteinte rénale aiguë dans 44 études (toutes interventions combinées). En raison d'une hétérogénéité clinique considérable (des scénarios cliniques différents, ainsi qu'une variabilité méthodologique considérable parmi les études), nous n'avons pas réalisé de méta-analyse sur les données combinées.

L'analyse en sous-groupe des principales interventions et des procédures chirurgicales n'a montré aucune influence significative des interventions sur les données de mortalité et datteinte rénale aiguë. Pour le sous-groupe de participants qui présentaient une lésion rénale préexistante, le risque de mortalité de 10 essais (959 participants) a été estimé par un rapport de cotes à (RC) 0,76; intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95% 0,38 à 1,52; le risque de lésion rénale aiguë ( rapporté dans les essais) a été estimé à partir de 11 essais (979 participants) par un RC à 0,43, IC à 95% 0,23 à 0.80. L'analyse en sous-groupe des études considérées comme présentant un faible risque de biais a révélé que pour 19 études rendant compte de la mortalité (1604 participants); le RC était de 1,01, IC à 95% 0,54 à 1.90. Quinze études ont rapporté des données sur l'atteinte rénale aiguë (critère choisi par les études elles mêmes; 1600 participants); le RC était de 1,03, IC à 95% 0,54 à 1.97.

Conclusions des auteurs

Aucune preuve fiable issue de la littérature disponible ne suggère que des interventions au cours de la chirurgie peuvent protéger contre des lésions rénales. Cependant, les critères utilisés pour diagnostiquer une lésion rénale aiguë variaient dans nombre d'études les plus anciennes sélectionnées pour l'inclusion dans cette revue, dont beaucoup étaient ternies par une mauvaise qualité méthodologique, telle qu'un nombre insuffisant de participants et une mauvaise définition des critères de jugement tels que l'insuffisance rénale aiguë et l'atteinte rénale aiguë. Des méthodes récentes de détection des atteintes rénales, telles que l'utilisation de biomarqueurs spécifiques et des critères mieux définis pour identifier les atteintes rénales (RIFLE (risque, atteinte, insuffisance, perte de la fonction rénale et insuffisance rénale terminale) ou AKI ( atteinte rénale aiguë)) pourraient être davantage explorées pour déterminer un éventuel bénéfice provenant des interventions utilisées pour protéger les reins pendant la période périopératoire.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Les interventions pour protéger la fonction rénale dans la période périopératoire

Aucune preuve n'indique que les mesures utilisées pour protéger les reins des patients pendant la période péri-opératoire sont bénéfiques

Les reins peuvent être endommagés pendant une opération en raison d'une atteinte directe ou indirecte. Les raisons en sont multiples et comprennent des modifications physiologiques engendrées par la chirurgie et par la réponse de l'organisme à une telle agression. Les lésions aux reins pendant la période périopératoire sont associées à une morbidité et à une mortalité significatives. Cette mise à jour de la revue Cochrane a étudié 72 essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) avec 4378 participants (données de recherche jusqu'à août 2012); les interventions incluaient le plus souvent des interventions pharmacologiques (administration de dopamine et de ses analogues, diurétiques, inhibiteurs des canaux calciques, inhibiteurs de l'enzyme de conversion de l'angiotensine (ECA), N-acetylcystéine, facteur natriurétique auriculaire, bicarbonate de sodium, antioxydants et érythropoïétine) ou des liquides d'hydratation sélectionnés. Nous avons tenté d'identifier d'éventuels dommages aux reins en évaluant la fonction rénale jusqu' à sept jours après l'opération.

Aucune preuve claire issue des ECR disponibles ne suggère que l'une des mesures utilisées pour protéger les reins pendant la période péri-opératoire soit bénéfique. Ces résultats valaient pour 14 études portant sur des patients atteints de lésion rénale préexistante et pour 24 études qui ont été considérées comme de bonne qualité méthodologique. Les critères de jugement principaux de ces études étaient la mortalité et latteinte rénale aiguë. La mortalité rapportée dans les études à faible risque de biais n'était pas différente entre les groupes d'intervention et les groupes témoin (rapport des cotes (RC) 1,01, intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95% 0,52 à 1,97) il en était de même pour latteinte rénale aiguë (RC 1,05, IC à 95% 0,55 à 2,03). Le résumé des résultats donnait une vision similaire. Nous en concluons donc que les preuves suggèrent qu'aucune des interventions utilisées actuellement n'est utile pour protéger les reins pendant la période périopératoire, ni qu'aucune n'entraîne d'augmentation des effets délétères.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 15th December, 2013
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Minist�re en charge de la Sant�