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Vitamin A supplementation for reducing the risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV infection

  1. Charles Shey Wiysonge1,*,
  2. Muki Shey2,
  3. Eugene J Kongnyuy3,
  4. Jonathan AC Sterne4,
  5. Peter Brocklehurst5

Editorial Group: Cochrane HIV/AIDS Group

Published Online: 19 JAN 2011

Assessed as up-to-date: 13 SEP 2010

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003648.pub3

How to Cite

Wiysonge CS, Shey M, Kongnyuy EJ, Sterne JAC, Brocklehurst P. Vitamin A supplementation for reducing the risk of mother-to-child transmission of HIV infection. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 1. Art. No.: CD003648. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003648.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Cape Town, School of Child and Adolescent Health, Cape Town, South Africa

  2. 2

    University of Cape Town, Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine (IIDMM), Cape Town, South Africa

  3. 3

    Liverpool School of Tropical Medicine, Child and Reproductive Health Group, Liverpool, UK

  4. 4

    University of Bristol, Department of Social Medicine, Bristol, UK

  5. 5

    University of Oxford, National Perinatal Epidemiology Unit, Headington, Oxford, UK

*Charles Shey Wiysonge, School of Child and Adolescent Health, University of Cape Town, Institute of Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, Anzio Road, Observatory, Cape Town, 7925, South Africa. charles.wiysonge@uct.ac.za. wiysonge@yahoo.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 19 JAN 2011

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[Figure 1]
Figure 1. Risk of bias graph: review authors' judgements about each risk of bias item presented as percentages across all included studies.
[Figure 2]
Figure 2. Risk of bias summary: review authors' judgements about each risk of bias item for each included study.
[Figure 3]
Figure 3. Forest plot: HIV infection in child.
[Figure 4]
Figure 4. Forest plot: Incidence of stillbirth.
[Figure 5]
Figure 5. Forest plot: Preterm (less than 37 weeks).
[Figure 6]
Figure 6. Forest plot: Low birth weight (less than 2500g).
[Figure 7]
Figure 7. Forest plot: Birthweight (in grammes).
[Analysis 1.1]
Analysis 1.1. Comparison 1 Vitamin A supplementation versus no vitamin A supplementation, Outcome 1 HIV infection in child.
[Analysis 1.2]
Analysis 1.2. Comparison 1 Vitamin A supplementation versus no vitamin A supplementation, Outcome 2 HIV infection or death.
[Analysis 1.3]
Analysis 1.3. Comparison 1 Vitamin A supplementation versus no vitamin A supplementation, Outcome 3 Stillbirth.
[Analysis 1.4]
Analysis 1.4. Comparison 1 Vitamin A supplementation versus no vitamin A supplementation, Outcome 4 Preterm less than 34 weeks.
[Analysis 1.5]
Analysis 1.5. Comparison 1 Vitamin A supplementation versus no vitamin A supplementation, Outcome 5 Preterm less than 37 weeks.
[Analysis 1.6]
Analysis 1.6. Comparison 1 Vitamin A supplementation versus no vitamin A supplementation, Outcome 6 Low birth weight less than 2500g.
[Analysis 1.7]
Analysis 1.7. Comparison 1 Vitamin A supplementation versus no vitamin A supplementation, Outcome 7 Low birthweight less than 2000g.
[Analysis 1.8]
Analysis 1.8. Comparison 1 Vitamin A supplementation versus no vitamin A supplementation, Outcome 8 Birthweight.
[Analysis 1.9]
Analysis 1.9. Comparison 1 Vitamin A supplementation versus no vitamin A supplementation, Outcome 9 Maternal death.
[Analysis 1.10]
Analysis 1.10. Comparison 1 Vitamin A supplementation versus no vitamin A supplementation, Outcome 10 Postpartum CD4 count.
[Analysis 1.11]
Analysis 1.11. Comparison 1 Vitamin A supplementation versus no vitamin A supplementation, Outcome 11 Infant death.
[Analysis 1.13]
Analysis 1.13. Comparison 1 Vitamin A supplementation versus no vitamin A supplementation, Outcome 13 Death of child by 24 months.
[Analysis 1.15]
Analysis 1.15. Comparison 1 Vitamin A supplementation versus no vitamin A supplementation, Outcome 15 Later death of child.