Audio-visual presentation of information for informed consent for participation in clinical trials

  • Conclusions changed
  • Review
  • Intervention

Authors

  • Anneliese Synnot,

    Corresponding author
    1. La Trobe University, Centre for Health Communication and Participation, School of Public Health and Human Biosciences, Bundoora, Vic, Australia
    2. School of Public Health and Human Biosciences, La Trobe University, Cochrane Consumers and Communication Review Group, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia
    • Anneliese Synnot, Centre for Health Communication and Participation, School of Public Health and Human Biosciences, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Vic, 3086, Australia. a.synnot@latrobe.edu.au.

    Search for more papers by this author
  • Rebecca Ryan,

    1. La Trobe University, Centre for Health Communication and Participation, School of Public Health and Human Biosciences, Bundoora, Vic, Australia
    2. School of Public Health and Human Biosciences, La Trobe University, Cochrane Consumers and Communication Review Group, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Megan Prictor,

    1. School of Public Health and Human Biosciences, La Trobe University, Cochrane Consumers and Communication Review Group, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Deirdre Fetherstonhaugh,

    1. La Trobe University, Australian Centre for Evidence Based Aged Care (ACEBAC), Bundoora, Victoria, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Barbara Parker

    1. La Trobe University, Australian Institute for Primary Care & Ageing, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bundoora, Victoria, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Background

Informed consent is a critical component of clinical research. Different methods of presenting information to potential participants of clinical trials may improve the informed consent process. Audio-visual interventions (presented, for example, on the Internet or on DVD) are one such method. We updated a 2008 review of the effects of these interventions for informed consent for trial participation.

Objectives

To assess the effects of audio-visual information interventions regarding informed consent compared with standard information or placebo audio-visual interventions regarding informed consent for potential clinical trial participants, in terms of their understanding, satisfaction, willingness to participate, and anxiety or other psychological distress.

Search methods

We searched: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), The Cochrane Library, issue 6, 2012; MEDLINE (OvidSP) (1946 to 13 June 2012); EMBASE (OvidSP) (1947 to 12 June 2012); PsycINFO (OvidSP) (1806 to June week 1 2012); CINAHL (EbscoHOST) (1981 to 27 June 2012); Current Contents (OvidSP) (1993 Week 27 to 2012 Week 26); and ERIC (Proquest) (searched 27 June 2012). We also searched reference lists of included studies and relevant review articles, and contacted study authors and experts. There were no language restrictions.

Selection criteria

We included randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing audio-visual information alone, or in conjunction with standard forms of information provision (such as written or verbal information), with standard forms of information provision or placebo audio-visual information, in the informed consent process for clinical trials. Trials involved individuals or their guardians asked to consider participating in a real or hypothetical clinical study. (In the earlier version of this review we only included studies evaluating informed consent interventions for real studies).

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently assessed studies for inclusion and extracted data. We synthesised the findings using meta-analysis, where possible, and narrative synthesis of results. We assessed the risk of bias of individual studies and considered the impact of the quality of the overall evidence on the strength of the results.

Main results

We included 16 studies involving data from 1884 participants. Nine studies included participants considering real clinical trials, and eight included participants considering hypothetical clinical trials, with one including both. All studies were conducted in high-income countries.

There is still much uncertainty about the effect of audio-visual informed consent interventions on a range of patient outcomes. However, when considered across comparisons, we found low to very low quality evidence that such interventions may slightly improve knowledge or understanding of the parent trial, but may make little or no difference to rate of participation or willingness to participate. Audio-visual presentation of informed consent may improve participant satisfaction with the consent information provided. However its effect on satisfaction with other aspects of the process is not clear. There is insufficient evidence to draw conclusions about anxiety arising from audio-visual informed consent. We found conflicting, very low quality evidence about whether audio-visual interventions took more or less time to administer. No study measured researcher satisfaction with the informed consent process, nor ease of use.

The evidence from real clinical trials was rated as low quality for most outcomes, and for hypothetical studies, very low. We note, however, that this was in large part due to poor study reporting, the hypothetical nature of some studies and low participant numbers, rather than inconsistent results between studies or confirmed poor trial quality. We do not believe that any studies were funded by organisations with a vested interest in the results.

Authors' conclusions

The value of audio-visual interventions as a tool for helping to enhance the informed consent process for people considering participating in clinical trials remains largely unclear, although trends are emerging with regard to improvements in knowledge and satisfaction. Many relevant outcomes have not been evaluated in randomised trials. Triallists should continue to explore innovative methods of providing information to potential trial participants during the informed consent process, mindful of the range of outcomes that the intervention should be designed to achieve, and balancing the resource implications of intervention development and delivery against the purported benefits of any intervention.

More trials, adhering to CONSORT standards, and conducted in settings and populations underserved in this review, i.e. low- and middle-income countries and people with low literacy, would strengthen the results of this review and broaden its applicability. Assessing process measures, such as time taken to administer the intervention and researcher satisfaction, would inform the implementation of audio-visual consent materials.

Résumé scientifique

Présentation audiovisuelle des informations de consentement éclairé pour la participation aux essais cliniques

Contexte

Le consentement éclairé est un élément critique de la recherche clinique. Différentes méthodes de présentation des informations aux participants potentiels d'essais cliniques pourraient améliorer le processus de consentement éclairé. Les interventions audiovisuelles (présentées, par exemple, sur Internet ou sur DVD) sont une de ces méthodes. Nous avons mis à jour une revue de 2008 sur les effets de ces interventions portant sur le consentement éclairé dans le cadre de la participation à des essais.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets des interventions d'informations audiovisuelles concernant le consentement éclairé par rapport aux informations standard ou à une intervention placebo audiovisuelle en rapport avec le consentement éclairé des participants potentiels d’essais cliniques, en termes de compréhension, satisfaction, volonté de participer et anxiété ou autre détresse psychologique.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans : le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL), la Bibliothèque Cochrane, numéro 6, 2012 ; MEDLINE (OvidSP) (de 1946 au 13 juin 2012) ; EMBASE (OvidSP) (de 1947 au 12 juin 2012) ; PsycINFO (OvidSP) (de 1806 à la 1ère semaine de juin 2012) ; CINAHL (EbscoHOST) (de 1981 au 27 juin 2012) ; Current Contents (OvidSP) (de la semaine 27 de 1993 à la semaine 26 de 2012) ; et ERIC (Proquest) (recherche effectuée le 27 juin 2012). Nous avons également effectué des recherches dans les références bibliographiques des études incluses et des articles de revue pertinents, et contacté les auteurs des études et des experts. Il n'y avait aucune restriction concernant la langue.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés et quasi randomisés comparant les informations audiovisuelles, seules ou en conjonction avec des formes standard de présentation des informations (par ex. informations écrites ou verbales), avec des formes standard de présentation des informations ou un placebo d’informations audiovisuelles, dans le cadre du processus de consentement éclairé pour les essais cliniques. Les essais portaient sur des individus ou leur tuteurs qui devaient réfléchir à une participation au sein d’une étude clinique réelle ou hypothétique. (Dans la version précédente de cette revue, nous avions uniquement inclus les études évaluant des interventions de consentement pour des études réelles).

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont indépendamment évalué les études à inclure et extrait les données. Nous avons synthétisé les résultats en une méta-analyse lorsque cela était possible et réalisé une synthèse narrative des résultats. Nous avons évalué le risque de biais des études individuelles et pris en compte l'impact de la qualité des preuves globales sur la solidité des résultats.

Résultats principaux

Nous avons inclus 16 études portant sur des données issues de 1 884 participants. Neuf études incluaient des personnes envisageant de participer à des essais cliniques réels, et huit incluaient des personnes envisageant de participer à des essais cliniques hypothétiques, dont un essai qui incluait les deux. Toutes les études ont été réalisées dans des pays à revenu élevé.

Il existe encore beaucoup d'incertitude concernant l'effet des interventions audiovisuelles de consentement éclairé sur un éventail de résultats des patients. Cependant, à l'étude des différentes comparaisons, nous avons trouvé des preuves de qualité faible à très faible que de telles interventions peuvent améliorer légèrement les connaissances ou la compréhension des essais, mais pourraient n’avoir que peu ou pas d’influence sur le taux de participation ou la volonté d'y participer. La présentation audiovisuelle du consentement éclairé peut améliorer la satisfaction des participants par rapport aux informations de consentement fournies. Cependant, son effet sur la satisfaction par rapport à d'autres aspects du processus n’est pas clair. Il n'existe pas suffisamment de preuves pour tirer des conclusions sur l'anxiété due à un consentement éclairé audiovisuel. Nous n'avons trouvé que des preuves contradictoires et de très faible qualité quant à savoir si les interventions audiovisuelles prenaient plus ou moins de temps à administrer. Aucune étude ne mesurait la satisfaction des chercheurs vis-à-vis du processus de consentement éclairé, ni la facilité d'utilisation.

Les preuves issues d'essais cliniques réels ont été considérées comme étant de faible qualité pour la plupart des critères de jugement, et très faible pour les études hypothétiques. Nous avons toutefois noté que cela était en grande partie dû à la mauvaise qualité des comptes-rendus des études, la nature hypothétique de certaines études et un faible nombre de participants, plutôt qu'à des résultats incohérents entre les études ou des essais réellement de mauvaise qualité. Nous ne pensons pas que les études étaient financées par des organisations avec un intérêt dans les résultats.

Conclusions des auteurs

La valeur des interventions audiovisuelles comme outil pour aider à améliorer le processus de consentement éclairé des personnes envisageant de participer à des essais cliniques reste largement incertaine, bien que des tendances apparaissent en ce qui concerne une amélioration des connaissances et de la satisfaction. De nombreux critères de jugement pertinents n'ont pas été évalués dans des essais randomisés. Les auteurs d'essais devraient continuer à explorer des méthodes innovantes d’information des participants potentiels à des essais au cours du processus de consentement éclairé, en gardant à l’esprit l’éventail de résultats que l'intervention doit chercher à obtenir, et en évaluant les conséquences en termes de ressources du développement et de l'administration des interventions par rapport aux bénéfices supposés de toute intervention.

D'autres essais, conformes aux normes CONSORT et réalisés dans des contextes et des populations mal desservies dans cette revue, à savoir les pays à faibles et moyens revenus et les personnes d'un faible niveau d'alphabétisation, permettraient de renforcer les résultats de cette revue et d’élargir son applicabilité. L'évaluation de mesures de processus, telles que le délai nécessaire pour administrer l'intervention et la satisfaction des chercheurs, pourrait orienter la mise en place de supports audiovisuels de consentement.

Plain language summary

Audio-visual presentation of information used in the informed consent process for people considering entering clinical trials

Review question

We reviewed the evidence about the effect of audio-visual presentation of information used in the informed consent process for people considering entering a clinical trial. We compared this with the usual informed consent information (either written and/or verbal) and placebo (sham) audio-visual information.

Background

Before taking part in a clinical trial, potential participants must be provided with detailed information, such as what they will be asked to do and any possible benefits or harms. Once they understand what is involved, and if they are happy to take part, they usually sign a consent form. This process is known as 'informed consent'. The problem is that consent forms use technical language that can be hard to for the average person to understand. Sometimes people agree to take part in a clinical trial even though they are unsure what is involved. Presenting the consent form information in an audio-visual format (for example, on a computer or DVD) might improve the informed consent process.

Study characteristics

We searched for studies of audio-visual informed consent interventions which allocated people to an experimental or control group by a random or quasi-random process, published up until June 2012. We found 16 studies, involving a total of 1884 people. Nine studies included people considering real clinical trials, eight included people asked to imagine participating in a clinical trial (a hypothetical trial), with one including both. Most of the studies were conducted in the United States.

People were considering (or imagined considering) participation in a range of different clinical trials, including those testing cancer treatments and drugs for mental health problems. The audio-visual informed consent information was presented on computers, DVDs, videos and CD-ROMs. They included voice overs by professional actors, real patients talking about their experiences and a combination of words, pictures and audio to explain the technical concepts. In some studies, people also received the usual written informed consent forms and/or a face-to-face explanation by the study staff.

Key results

There is low to very low quality evidence that audio-visual consent interventions may slightly improve knowledge or understanding of the parent trial, but may make little or no difference to rate of participation or willingness to participate. Audio-visual presentation may improve participation satisfaction with the information provided. However its effect on satisfaction with other aspects of the process is not clear. There is not enough evidence to draw conclusions about anxiety arising from audio-visual informed consent. There is conflicting, very low quality evidence about whether audio-visual interventions take more or less time to administer, and no study measured researcher satisfaction with the informed consent process, nor ease of use.

We do not believe that any studies were funded by organisations with a vested interest in the results.

Quality of the evidence

The quality of evidence from real clinical trials was low, and from hypothetical clinical studies, very low. This is because of the small number of people in the studies, and some issues in the way they were conducted. If the next update of this review includes more studies of audio-visual informed consent presentation, it could change the results of this review.

Résumé simplifié

Présentation audiovisuelle des informations utilisées dans le processus de consentement éclairé pour les personnes qui envisagent de participer à des essais cliniques

Question de la revue

Nous avons examiné les preuves concernant l'effet d'une présentation audiovisuelle des informations utilisées dans le processus de consentement éclairé aux personnes envisageant d’intégrer un essai clinique. Nous avons comparé cette méthode avec les informations de consentement éclairé habituelles (écrites et/ou verbales) et avec des informations audiovisuelles placebo (simulation).

Contexte

Avant la participation à un essai clinique, des informations détaillées doivent être apportées aux participants potentiels, telles que ce qu'ils devront faire et les éventuels effets bénéfiques ou délétères. Une fois compris ce qui est en jeu, et s’ils souhaitent participer, ils signent habituellement un formulaire de consentement. Ce processus est connu sous le nom de « consentement éclairé ». Le problème est que les formulaires de consentement utilisent un language technique, qui peut être difficile à comprendre pour l'individu lambda. Parfois, les patients acceptent de participer à un essai clinique sans être sûrs de ce qui est en jeu. La présentation audiovisuelle des informations des formulaires de consentement (par exemple, sur un ordinateur ou DVD) pourrait améliorer le processus de consentement éclairé.

Les caractéristiques de l'étude

Nous avons recherché des études portant sur une présentation audiovisuelle des informations de consentement éclairé qui assignaient les personnes à un groupe expérimental ou un groupe témoin de façon randomisée ou quasi randomisée, publiées jusqu'en juin 2012. Nous avons trouvé 16 études, impliquant un total de 1 884 personnes. Neuf études incluaient des patients envisageant de participer à des essais cliniques réels, huit demandaient à des personnes d’imaginer leur participation à un essai clinique (un essai hypothétique), une incluait les deux. La plupart des études ont été réalisées aux États-Unis.

Les personnes envisageaient (ou prétendaient envisager) leur participation à un éventail d'essais cliniques, y compris des essais portant sur des traitements du cancer et des problèmes de santé mentale. L’information audiovisuelle de consentement éclairé était présentée sur des ordinateurs, DVDs, vidéos et CD-ROMs. Elle incluait des voix off enregistrées par des acteurs professionnels, de vrais patients partageant leur expérience et une combinaison de mots, images et enregistrements audio pour expliquer les concepts techniques. Dans certaines études, les patients recevaient également les habituels formulaires écrits de consentement éclairé et/ou une explication en face à face par le personnel de l’étude.

Résultats principaux

Il existe des preuves de qualité faible à très faible que les interventions audiovisuelles de consentement peuvent légèrement améliorer les connaissances ou la compréhension des essais, mais il pourrait n’y avoir que peu ou pas de différence en termes de taux de participation ou de volonté d'y participer. La présentation audiovisuelle pourrait améliorer la satisfaction des participants vis-à-vis des informations fournies. Cependant, son effet sur la satisfaction vis-à-vis d'autres aspects du processus n’est pas clair. Il n'existe pas suffisamment de preuves pour tirer des conclusions sur l'anxiété issue d’une présentation audiovisuelle du consentement éclairé. Les preuves sont contradictoires et de très faible qualité quant à savoir si les interventions audiovisuelles prennent plus ou moins de temps à administrer, et aucune étude ne mesurait la satisfaction des chercheurs vis-à-vis du processus de consentement éclairé, ni la facilité d'utilisation.

Nous ne pensons pas que les études étaient financées par des organisations avec un intérêt dans les résultats.

Qualité des preuves

La qualité des preuves issues des essais cliniques réels était faible, et celle des preuves issues des études cliniques hypothétique était très faible. Cela s’explique par le petit nombre de personnes dans les études, et certains aspects de la manière dont elles ont été réalisées. Si la prochaine mise à jour de cette revue inclut davantage d'études concernant la présentation audiovisuelle du consentement éclairé, elle pourrait modifier les résultats de cette revue.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 3rd August, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Minist�re en charge de la Sant�