Intervention Review

You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article

Communication skills training for healthcare professionals working with people who have cancer

  1. Philippa M Moore1,*,
  2. Solange Rivera Mercado1,
  3. Mónica Grez Artigues1,
  4. Theresa A Lawrie2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group

Published Online: 28 MAR 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 19 FEB 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003751.pub3

How to Cite

Moore PM, Rivera Mercado S, Grez Artigues M, Lawrie TA. Communication skills training for healthcare professionals working with people who have cancer. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 3. Art. No.: CD003751. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003751.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    P. Universidad Catolica de Chile, Family Medicine, Santiago, Chile

  2. 2

    Royal United Hospital, Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group, Bath, UK

*Philippa M Moore, Family Medicine, P. Universidad Catolica de Chile, Lira 44, Santiago, Chile. moore.philippa@gmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 28 MAR 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

This is an updated version of a review that was originally published in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews in 2004, Issue 2. People with cancer, their families and carers have a high prevalence of psychological stress which may be minimised by effective communication and support from their attending healthcare professionals (HCPs). Research suggests communication skills do not reliably improve with experience, therefore, considerable effort is dedicated to courses that may improve communication skills for HCPs involved in cancer care. A variety of communication skills training (CST) courses have been proposed and are in practice. We conducted this review to determine whether CST works and which types of CST, if any, are the most effective.

Objectives

To assess whether CST is effective in improving the communication skills of HCPs involved in cancer care, and in improving patient health status and satisfaction.

Search methods

We searched the following electronic databases: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) Issue 2, 2012, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycInfo and CINAHL to February 2012. The original search was conducted in November 2001. In addition, we handsearched the reference lists of relevant articles and relevant conference proceedings for additional studies.

Selection criteria

The original review was a narrative review that included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled before-and-after studies. In this updated version, we limited our criteria to RCTs evaluating 'CST' compared with 'no CST' or other CST in HCPs working in cancer care. Primary outcomes were changes in HCP communication skills measured in interactions with real and/or simulated patients with cancer, using objective scales. We excluded studies whose focus was communication skills in encounters related to informed consent for research.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently assessed trials and extracted data to a pre-designed data collection form. We pooled data using the random-effects model and, for continuous data, we used standardised mean differences (SMDs).

Main results

We included 15 RCTs (42 records), conducted mainly in outpatient settings. Eleven studies compared CST with no CST intervention, three studies compared the effect of a follow-up CST intervention after initial CST training, and one study compared two types of CST. The types of CST courses evaluated in these trials were diverse. Study participants included oncologists (six studies), residents (one study) other doctors (one study), nurses (six studies) and a mixed team of HCPs (one study). Overall, 1147 HCPs participated (536 doctors, 522 nurses and 80 mixed HCPs).

Ten studies contributed data to the meta-analyses. HCPs in the CST group were statistically significantly more likely to use open questions in the post-intervention interviews than the control group (five studies, 679 participant interviews; P = 0.04, I² = 65%) and more likely to show empathy towards patients (six studies, 727 participant interviews; P = 0.004, I² = 0%); we considered this evidence to be of moderate and high quality, respectively. Doctors and nurses did not perform statistically significantly differently for any HCP outcomes.There were no statistically significant differences in the other HCP communication skills except for the subgroup of participant interviews with simulated patients, where the intervention group was significantly less likely to present 'facts only' compared with the control group (four studies, 344 participant interviews; P = 0.01, I² = 70%).

There were no significant differences between the groups with regard to outcomes assessing HCP 'burnout', patient satisfaction or patient perception of the HCPs communication skills. Patients in the control group experienced a greater reduction in mean anxiety scores in a meta-analyses of two studies (169 participant interviews; P = 0.02; I² = 8%); we considered this evidence to be of a very low quality.

Authors' conclusions

Various CST courses appear to be effective in improving some types of HCP communication skills related to information gathering and supportive skills. We were unable to determine whether the effects of CST are sustained over time, whether consolidation sessions are necessary, and which types of CST programs are most likely to work. We found no evidence to support a beneficial effect of CST on HCP 'burnout', patients' mental or physical health, and patient satisfaction.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Are courses aimed at improving the way doctors and nurses communicate with patients with cancer helpful?

People with cancer, and those who care for them, often suffer from psychological stress which may be reduced by effective communication and support from their attending doctor, nurse or other healthcare professional (HCP). Research suggests communication skills do not reliably improve with experience, therefore, considerable effort is dedicated to courses to improve communication skills for HCPs involved in cancer care. Many different types of communication skills training (CST) courses have been proposed and are in practice. We conducted this review to determine whether CST works and which types of CST, if any, are the most effective.

We found 15 studies to include in this review. All of these studies except one were conducted in nurses and doctors. To measure the impact of CST, some studies used encounters with real patients and some used role-players (simulated patients). We found that CST significantly improved some of the communication skills used by healthcare workers, including using 'open questions' in the interview to gather information and showing empathy as a way of supporting their patients. Other communication skills evaluated showed no significant differences between the HCPs who received the training and those who did not. We did not find evidence to suggest any benefits of CST to patients' mental and physical health, patient satisfaction levels or quality of life, however, few studies addressed these outcomes. Furthermore, it is not clear whether the improvement in HCP communication skills is sustained over time and which types of CST are best.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Formation aux compétences de communication des professionnels de santé côtoyant des personnes atteintes d'un cancer

Contexte

Ceci est une version mise à jour d'une revue initialement publiée dans la base des revues systématiques Cochrane en 2004, numéro 2. La prévalence de stress psychologique des personnes atteintes d'un cancer, de leurs familles et soignants est élevée et peut être réduite grâce à une communication efficace et un soutien des professionnels de santé (PS) traitants. La recherche suggère que les compétences de communication ne s'améliorent pas de manière fiable avec l'expérience. Par conséquent, un effort considérable est consacré à la formation qui est susceptible d'améliorer ces compétences chez les PS prodiguant des soins oncologiques. Une variété de cours de formation aux compétences de communication (FCC) sont proposés et appliqués. Nous avons réalisé cette revue afin de déterminer si la FCC est utile, ainsi que les types de FCC, le cas échéant, les plus efficaces.

Objectifs

Déterminer si la FCC permet d'améliorer efficacement les compétences de communication des PS prodiguant des soins oncologiques, ainsi que l'état de santé et la satisfaction des patients.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans les bases de données électroniques suivantes : le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) numéro 2, 2012, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycInfo et CINAHL jusqu'en février 2012. Les recherches initiales ont été réalisées en novembre 2001. Nous avons également effectué des recherches dans les listes bibliographiques des articles et actes de conférence pertinents afin d'obtenir des études supplémentaires.

Critères de sélection

La revue d'origine était une revue narrative incluant des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) et des études contrôlées avant-après. Dans cette version mise à jour, nous avons limité nos critères aux ECR comparant la FCC à l'absence de FCC ou à d'autres FCC destinées aux PS prodiguant des soins oncologiques. Les critères de jugement principaux étaient une modification des compétences de communication, dans le cadre d'interactions avec de vrais patients et/ou des patients simulés atteints d'un cancer, en utilisant des échelles de mesure objectives. Nous avons exclu les études privilégiant des compétences de communication dans le cadre de rencontres impliquant un consentement éclairé à des fins de recherche.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment évalué les essais et extrait des données vers un formulaire de collecte de données préconçu à cet effet. Nous avons regroupé ces données en utilisant un modèle à effets aléatoires et, pour les données continues, nous avons utilisé des différences moyennes standardisées (DMS).

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus 15 ECR (42 dossiers) principalement réalisés en milieu ambulatoire. Onze études comparaient la FCC à l'absence de FCC, trois études comparaient les effets de la FCC avec suivi après une FCC initiale et une étude comparait deux types de FCC. Les types de cours de la FCC évalués dans ces essais étaient divers. Les participants à l'étude étaient des oncologistes (six études), des résidents (une étude), des médecins autres (une étude), des infirmières (six études) et une équipe composée de PS mixtes (une étude). Dans l'ensemble, 1 147 PS ont participé (536 médecins, 522 infirmières et 80 PS mixtes) aux essais.

Trois études ont fourni des données pour la réalisation de méta-analyses. Les PS du groupe de la FCC avaient statistiquement beaucoup plus tendance à poser des questions ouvertes dans des entretiens réalisés après une intervention par rapport au groupe témoin (cinq études, 679 participants aux entretiens ; P = 0,04, I² = 65 %) et étaient plus enclins à faire preuve d'empathie envers les patients (six études, 727 entretiens aux entretiens ; P = 0,004, I² = 0 %) ; nous avons estimé que ces preuves étaient de qualité modérée et élevée, respectivement. Les médecins et infirmières n'ont pas agi de façon significativement différente d'un point de vue statistique pour aucun des résultats de la FCC. Il n'y avait aucune différence statistiquement significative concernant les autres compétences de communication des PS, hormis pour le sous-groupe de participants aux entretiens composés de patients simulés, dans lequel le groupe expérimental était significativement moins enclin à présenter « uniquement des faits » par rapport au groupe témoin (quatre études, 344 participants aux entretiens ; P = 0,01, I² = 70 %).

Il n'y avait aucune différence significative entre les groupes au niveau des résultats évaluant l'« épuisement » des PS, la satisfaction des patients ou leur perception des compétences de communication des PS. Les patients du groupe témoin ont vu leurs scores d'anxiété moyens diminuer de manière significative dans une méta-analyse composée de deux études (169 participants aux entretiens ; P = 0,02 ; I² = 8 %) ; nous avons estimé que cette preuve était de qualité très médiocre.

Conclusions des auteurs

Plusieurs cours de FCC semblent améliorer efficacement certains types de compétences des PS en matière de communication grâce au regroupement d'informations et à des compétences de soutien. Nous n'avons pas pu déterminer si les effets de la FCC sont durables dans le temps, si les sessions de consolidation sont nécessaires, ainsi que les types de programmes de FCC ayant le plus de chances d'être efficaces. Nous n'avons trouvé aucune preuve permettant de soutenir un effet bénéfique de la FCC sur l'« épuisement » des PS, la santé mentale et physique des patients et la satisfaction de ces derniers.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Formation aux compétences de communication des professionnels de santé côtoyant des personnes atteintes d'un cancer

Est-il utile de suivre des cours afin d'améliorer la communication entre les médecins/infirmières et les patients atteints d'un cancer ?

Les personnes atteintes d'un cancer, ainsi que leurs soignants, souffrent généralement d'un stress psychologique qui peut être atténué grâce à une communication efficace et un soutien de leur médecin traitant, des infirmières et des autres professionnels de santé (PS). La recherche suggère que les compétences de communication ne s'améliorent pas de manière fiable avec l'expérience. Par conséquent, un effort considérable est consacré à la formation afin d'améliorer ces compétences chez les PS prodiguant des soins oncologiques. Plusieurs types différents de cours de formation aux compétences de communication (FCC) sont proposés et appliqués. Nous avons réalisé cette revue afin de déterminer si la FCC est utile, ainsi que les types de FCC, le cas échéant, les plus efficaces.

Nous avons identifié 15 études à inclure dans cette revue. Toutes ces études, sauf une, ont été réalisées auprès d'infirmières et de médecins. Pour mesurer l'impact de la FCC, certaines études ont organisé des rencontres avec de vrais patients et d'autres ont sollicités de faux patients (patients simulés). Nous avons trouvé que la FCC améliorait significativement certaines des compétences de communication utilisées par les agents de santé, notamment l'utilisation de « questions ouvertes » pendant un entretien afin de regrouper des informations et faire preuve d'empathie pour montrer leur soutien aux patients. D'autres compétences de communication étudiées n'ont montré aucune différence significative entre les PS ayant suivi une formation et ceux qui n'en ont pas bénéficié. Nous n'avons trouvé aucune preuve suggérant des effets bénéfiques de la FCC sur la santé mentale et physique des patients, les taux de satisfaction ou la qualité de vie des patients. Toutefois, peu études se sont intéressées à ces résultats. De plus, on ignore si l'amélioration des compétences de communication des PS était durable dans le temps et les types de FCC les plus efficaces.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 27th March, 2014
Traduction financée par: Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux pour la France: Minist�re en charge de la Sant�