Intervention Review

Fluorides for the prevention of early tooth decay (demineralised white lesions) during fixed brace treatment

  1. Philip E Benson1,*,
  2. Nicola Parkin1,
  3. Fiona Dyer1,
  4. Declan T Millett2,
  5. Susan Furness3,
  6. Peter Germain4

Editorial Group: Cochrane Oral Health Group

Published Online: 12 DEC 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 31 JAN 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003809.pub3

How to Cite

Benson PE, Parkin N, Dyer F, Millett DT, Furness S, Germain P. Fluorides for the prevention of early tooth decay (demineralised white lesions) during fixed brace treatment. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 12. Art. No.: CD003809. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003809.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    School of Clinical Dentistry, University of Sheffield, Academic Unit of Oral Health and Development, Sheffield, UK

  2. 2

    Cork University Dental School and Hospital, Oral Health and Development, Cork, Ireland

  3. 3

    School of Dentistry, The University of Manchester, Cochrane Oral Health Group, Manchester, UK

  4. 4

    Newcastle Dental Hospital, Department of Orthodontics, Newcastle upon Tyne, Tyne and Wear, UK

*Philip E Benson, Academic Unit of Oral Health and Development, School of Clinical Dentistry, University of Sheffield, Claremont Crescent, Sheffield, S10 2TA, UK. p.benson@sheffield.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (conclusions changed)
  2. Published Online: 12 DEC 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Demineralised white lesions (DWLs) can appear on teeth during fixed brace treatment because of early decay around the brackets that attach the braces to the teeth. Fluoride is effective in reducing decay in susceptible individuals in the general population. Individuals receiving orthodontic treatment may be prescribed various forms of fluoride treatment. This review compares the effects of various forms of fluoride used during orthodontic treatment on the development of DWLs. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2004.

Objectives

The primary objective of this review was to evaluate the effects of fluoride in reducing the incidence of DWLs on the teeth during orthodontic treatment.

The secondary objectives were to examine the effectiveness of different modes of fluoride delivery in reducing the incidence of DWLs, as well as the size of lesions. Participant-assessed outcomes, such as perception of DWLs, and oral health–related quality of life data were to be included, as would reports of adverse effects.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 31 January 2013); the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 12); MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 31 January 2013); and EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 31 January 2013).

Selection criteria

We included trials if they met the following criteria: (1) parallel-group randomised clinical trials comparing the use of a fluoride-containing product versus placebo, no treatment or a different type of fluoride treatment, in which (2) the outcome of enamel demineralisation was assessed at the start and at the end of orthodontic treatment.

Data collection and analysis

At least two review authors independently, in duplicate, conducted risk of bias assessments and extracted data. Authors of trials were contacted to obtain missing data or to ask for clarification of aspects of trial methodology. The Cochrane Collaboration's statistical guidelines were followed.

Main results

For the 2013 update of this review, three changes were made to the protocol regarding inclusion criteria. Fourteen studies included in the previous version of the review were excluded from this update for the following reasons: five previously included studies were quasi-randomised, a further five were split-mouth studies, three measured outcomes on extracted teeth only and in one, the same fluoride intervention was used in each intervention group of the study.

Three studies and 458 participants were included in this updated review. One study was assessed at low risk of bias for all domains, in one study the risk of bias was unclear and in the remaining study, the risk of bias was high.

One placebo-controlled study of fluoride varnish applied every six weeks (253 participants, low risk of bias), provided moderate-quality evidence of an almost 70% reduction in DWLs (risk ratio (RR) 0.31, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.21 to 0.44, P value < 0.001). This finding is considered to provide moderate-quality evidence for this intervention because it has not yet been replicated by further studies in orthodontic participants.

One study compared two different formulations of fluoride toothpaste and mouthrinse prescribed for participants undergoing orthodontic treatment (97 participants, unclear risk of bias) and found no difference between an amine fluoride and stannous fluoride toothpaste/mouthrinse combination and a sodium fluoride toothpaste/mouthrinse combination for the outcomes of white spot index, visible plaque index and gingival bleeding index.

One small study (37 participants) compared the use of an intraoral fluoride-releasing glass bead device attached to the brace versus a daily fluoride mouthrinse. The study was assessed at high risk of bias because a substantial number of participants were lost to follow-up, and compliance with use of the mouthrinse was not measured.

Neither secondary outcomes of this review nor adverse effects of interventions were reported in any of the included studies.

Authors' conclusions

This review found some moderate evidence that fluoride varnish applied every six weeks at the time of orthodontic review during treatment is effective, but this finding is based on a single study. Further adequately powered, double-blind, randomised controlled trials are required to determine the best means of preventing DWLs in patients undergoing orthodontic treatment and the most accurate means of assessing compliance with treatment and possible adverse effects. Future studies should follow up participants beyond the end of orthodontic treatment to determine the effect of DWLs on participant satisfaction with treatment.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Fluorides for the prevention of early tooth decay (demineralised white lesions) during fixed brace treatment

Review question

Ugly white marks sometimes appear on the teeth during orthodontic (brace) treatment. These are caused by early tooth decay and usually occur with fixed (or glued-on 'train track') braces when the teeth are not cleaned properly.

We know that fluoride in toothpaste helps to prevent dental decay; therefore, extra fluoride provided to people wearing braces should protect them from these marks. This review, produced by the Cochrane Oral Health Group, examines the evidence for this in existing research. The aim of this review is to assess the effectiveness of fluorides in preventing early tooth decay during orthodontic (brace) treatment and to determine the best way to do this.

Background

Early tooth decay around the brackets that attach braces to the teeth can cause white or brown marks (demineralised white lesions (DWLs)) to appear on teeth during fixed brace treatment. Build-up of dental plaque around these brackets is associated with increased risk of rapid demineralisation of the enamel of teeth. Demineralisation is an early, but reversible, stage in the development of tooth decay. Wearing of fixed braces may be associated with pain, and both the brace and the pain make toothbrushing more difficult, which in turn means that it is harder to prevent the build-up of plaque. People often wear braces for 18 months or longer, and there is a risk that tooth decay will damage the teeth, requiring restorations and fillings to be done.

Fluoride is effective in reducing tooth decay in people who are at risk of developing it. Individuals receiving orthodontic treatment may be prescribed various forms of fluoride treatment. It is important to consider how the fluoride is to be applied and whether children and adolescents (receiving fixed brace treatment) are likely to be willing and able to regularly apply by themselves the amounts needed to prevent early tooth decay.

Study characteristics

The evidence on which this review is based was up-to-date as of 31 January 2013. Three studies with 458 participants were included in this updated review. Participants were undergoing orthodontic treatment with fixed braces, and DWLs were assessed on teeth remaining in the mouth at the end of orthodontic treatment.

The different ways of applying fluoride that were assessed included:

1. topical fluorides, for example, fluoride-containing varnish, mouthrinse, gel or toothpaste;
2. fluoride-releasing devices attached to the braces; and
3. control group approaches - individuals did not receive additional fluoride as described, or they received a placebo or a different form of fluoride.

Key results

One study showed that when the dentist paints fluoride-containing varnish around the teeth and brace every time it is adjusted, the risk of developing white marks is reduced by nearly 70%; however, further well-designed trials are required to confirm this finding.

The rest of the evidence is weak, and more studies are needed to show the best way of delivering extra fluoride to people wearing braces. Adverse effects or harms of interventions were not reported in any of the included studies.

Quality of the evidence

The quality of the evidence found is moderate in the case of one well-designed study and weak in the remaining studies. Recommendations state that further well-conducted research should be conducted in this area.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Fluorures dans la prévention des caries précoce (lésions blanches déminéralisées) pendant un traitement avec un appareil dentaire fixe

Contexte

Les lésions blanches déminéralisées peuvent apparaître sur les dents pendant un traitement avec un appareil fixe en raison d'une carie précoce autour des supports qui relient les bagues aux dents. Le fluorure est efficace dans la réduction des caries chez les personnes sensibles dans l’ensemble de la population. Les personnes recevant un traitement orthodontique peuvent être prescrites diverses formes de traitement au fluorure. Cette revue compare les effets de diverses formes de fluorure utilisées pendant le traitement orthodontique pour prévenir le développement des lésions blanches déminéralisées. Ceci est une mise à jour d'une revue Cochrane publiée pour la première fois en 2004.

Objectifs

L'objectif principal de cette revue était d'évaluer les effets du fluorure pour réduire l'incidence de lésions blanches déminéralisées sur les dents pendant le traitement orthodontique.

Les objectifs secondaires étaient d'examiner l'efficacité de différents modes de fluorure pour réduire l'incidence de lésions blanches déminéralisées, ainsi que la taille des lésions. Les critères de jugement évalués par les participants, tels que la perception de lésions blanches déminéralisées et la qualité de vie liée à la santé buccale, ainsi que les rapports sur les effets indésirables devaient être inclus.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre des essais du groupe Cochrane sur la santé bucco-dentaire (jusqu' au 31 janvier 2013); le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (La Bibliothèque Cochrane 2012, numéro 12); MEDLINE via OVID (de 1946 au 31 janvier 2013); et EMBASE via OVID (de 1980 au 31 janvier 2013).

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus les essais s'ils répondaient aux critères suivants: (1) groupes parallèles des essais cliniques randomisés comparant l'utilisation d'un produit contenant du fluorure par rapport à un placebo, à l'absence de traitement ou à un autre type de traitement au fluorure, dans lesquels (2) le critère de jugement de la déminéralisation de l’émail a été évalué au début et à la fin du traitement orthodontique.

Recueil et analyse des données

Au moins deux auteurs de la revue ont évalué les risques de biais et extrait les données de manière indépendante et en double. Les auteurs des essais ont été contactés pour obtenir des données manquantes ou clarifier certains aspects de la méthodologie des essais. Les directives statistiques de la Collaboration Cochrane ont été suivies.

Résultats Principaux

Pour la mise à jour de 2013, trois changements ont été effectués au protocole concernant les critères d'inclusion. Quatorze études incluses dans la version précédente de la revue ont été exclues de cette mise à jour pour les raisons suivantes : cinq études précédemment incluses étaient quasi-randomisées, cinq autres étaient sur bouche divisée, trois mesuraient les critères de jugement uniquement sur les dents extraites et pour une étude, la même intervention au fluorure était utilisée dans chaque groupe d'intervention de l'étude.

Trois études et 458 participants ont été inclus dans cette revue mise à jour. Une étude a été évaluée à faible risque de biais pour tous les domaines. Dans une étude, le risque de biais n'était pas clair et dans l'autre étude, le risque de biais était élevé.

Une étude contrôlée par placebo de vernis au fluorure appliqué toutes les six semaines (253 participants, faible risque de biais), a fourni des preuves de qualité modérée d'une réduction de lésions blanches déminéralisées de presque 70% (risque relatif (RR) 0,31, intervalle de confiance à 95% (IC) de 0,21 à 0,44, valeur P < 0,001). Ce résultat fournit des preuves de qualité modérée pour cette intervention, car il n'a pas encore été répliqué par d'autres études de participants orthodontiques.

Une étude a comparé deux différentes formulations de dentifrice au fluorure et de bain de bouche prescrits aux participants subissant un traitement orthodontique (97 participants, risque de biais incertain) et n'a trouvé aucune différence entre la combinaison d’un dentifrice / bain de bouche au fluorure d’amines avec le fluorure stanneux et un dentifrice / bain de bouche au fluorure de sodium pour les critères de jugement des taches blanches, de la plaque dentaire et des saignements gingivaux.

Une étude de petite taille (37 participants) comparait l'utilisation d'un dispositif de bille de verre intra-buccal fixé à l'appareil dentaire et libérant du fluorure par rapport à un bain de bouche quotidien au fluorure. L'étude a été évaluée avec un risque de biais élevé parce qu’un nombre important de participants avaient été perdu de vue durant le suivi et l'observance de l’utilisation du bain de bouche n'a pas été mesurée.

Ni les critères de jugement secondaires de cette revue, ni les effets indésirables des interventions n’ont été rapportés dans aucune des études incluses.

Conclusions des auteurs

Cette revue a trouvé certaines preuves de qualité modérée indiquant que le vernis au fluorure, appliqué toutes les six semaines au moment de la revue orthodontique pendant le traitement, est efficace, mais ce résultat est basé sur une seule étude. Des essais contrôlés randomisés supplémentaires, suffisamment puissants et en double aveugle sont nécessaires pour déterminer le meilleur moyen de prévenir les lésions blanches déminéralisées chez les patients subissant un traitement orthodontique et le moyen le plus précis pour évaluer l'observance du traitement et les effets indésirables potentiels. Les futures études devraient effectuer un suivi des participants au-delà de la fin du traitement orthodontique pour déterminer l'effet des lésions blanches déminéralisées sur la satisfaction des participants avec le traitement.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Fluorures dans la prévention des caries précoce (lésions blanches déminéralisées) pendant un traitement avec un appareil dentaire fixe

Fluorures dans la prévention des caries précoce (lésions blanches déminéralisées) pendant un traitement avec un appareil dentaire fixe

Question de la revue

Des marques blanches déplaisantes apparaissent parfois sur les dents au cours d’un traitement orthodontique (appareil dentaire). Elles sont causées par une carie dentaire précoce et surviennent généralement avec des appareils dentaires fixes (ou collés) lorsque les dents ne sont pas correctement nettoyées.

Nous savons que le fluorure dans le dentifrice aide à prévenir la formation de caries dentaires; par conséquent, un supplément en fluorure chez les patients portant un appareil dentaire fixe devrait les protéger de ces taches. Cette revue, produite par le groupe Cochrane sur la santé bucco-dentaire, examine les preuves dans les recherches existantes. L'objectif de cette revue est d'évaluer l'efficacité des fluorures dans la prévention des caries précoces pendant le traitement orthodontique (appareil dentaire) et de déterminer la meilleure façon de l’effectuer.

Contexte

La carie dentaire précoce autour des supports qui relient les bagues aux dents peut provoquer des taches blanches ou brunes (lésions blanches déminéralisées) sur les dents pendant un traitement avec un appareil fixe. L’accumulation de plaque dentaire autour de ces supports est associée à un risque accru de déminéralisation rapide de l'émail des dents. La déminéralisation est un stade précoce, mais réversible, dans le développement de caries. Le port d'un appareil orthodontique fixe peut être associé à de la douleur, ce qui ne facilite pas le brossage des dents et il est donc plus difficile de prévenir l'accumulation de plaque dentaire. Les personnes portent souvent un appareil dentaire pendant une durée de 18 mois ou plus et les caries dentaires peuvent abimer les dents, des obturations et des plombages seront donc nécessaires.

Le fluorure est efficace pour réduire la carie dentaire chez les personnes qui risquent de la développer. Les personnes recevant un traitement orthodontique peuvent être prescrites diverses formes de traitement au fluorure. Il est important de tenir compte de la façon dont le fluorure doit être appliqué et si les enfants et les adolescents (recevant un traitement avec un appareil fixe) sont enclins et capables d’appliquer régulièrement les quantités nécessaires par eux-mêmes pour prévenir la formation précoce de caries dentaires.

Les caractéristiques de l'étude

Les preuves sur lesquelles cette revue est basée ont été actualisées le 31 janvier 2013. Trois études totalisant 458 participants ont été inclues dans cette revue mise à jour. Les participants subissaient un traitement orthodontique avec un appareil fixe et les lésions blanches déminéralisées ont été évaluées sur les dents restantes à la fin du traitement orthodontique.

Différentes méthodes d'applications de fluorure qui ont été évaluées incluaient:

1. La fluoration, par exemple, du vernis, un bain de bouche, du gel ou du dentifrice contenant du fluor
2. Du fluor fixé sur les attelles;
3. Différentes approches des groupe de contrôle - les personnes n'avaient pas reçu de fluorure comme décrit, ou avaient reçu un placebo ou une autre forme de fluorure.

Résultats principaux

Une étude a montré que lorsque le dentiste vernit le contour de la dent et l’appareil dentaire au fluorure et à chaque ajustage, le risque de développer des taches blanches est réduit de presque 70%; toutefois, d'autres essais bien conçus sont nécessaires pour confirmer ce résultat.

Le reste des preuves est faible et des études supplémentaires sont nécessaires pour établir la meilleure façon d'administrer un supplément de fluorure à des personnes portant un appareil dentaire fixe. Les effets indésirables ou les inconvénients des interventions n'étaient rapportés dans aucune des études incluses.

Qualité des preuves

Les preuves identifiées sont de qualité modérée dans le cas d'une étude bien planifiée et faibles dans les études restantes. Les recommandations indiquent que d'autres recherches bien réalisées devraient être menées dans ce domaine.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 14th January, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé