Intervention Review

Conservative prevention and management of pelvic organ prolapse in women

  1. Suzanne Hagen1,*,
  2. Diane Stark2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Incontinence Group

Published Online: 7 DEC 2011

Assessed as up-to-date: 6 MAY 2010

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003882.pub4


How to Cite

Hagen S, Stark D. Conservative prevention and management of pelvic organ prolapse in women. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 12. Art. No.: CD003882. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003882.pub4.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Glasgow Caledonian University, Nursing, Midwifery and Allied Health Professions Research Unit, Glasgow, UK

  2. 2

    Leicester Royal Infirmary, Colorectal/Stoma Care Office, Leicester, UK

*Suzanne Hagen, Nursing, Midwifery and Allied Health Professions Research Unit, Glasgow Caledonian University, Glasgow, G4 0BA, UK. s.hagen@gcal.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (conclusions changed)
  2. Published Online: 7 DEC 2011

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Pelvic organ prolapse is common, and some degree of prolapse is seen in 50% of parous women. Women with prolapse can experience a variety of pelvic floor symptoms. Treatments include surgery, mechanical devices and conservative management. Conservative management approaches, such as giving lifestyle advice and delivering pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT), are often used in cases of mild to moderate prolapse. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2004, and previously updated in 2006.

Objectives

To determine the effects of conservative management (physical and lifestyle interventions) for the prevention or treatment of pelvic organ prolapse in comparison with no treatment or other treatment options (such as mechanical devices or surgery).

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Incontinence Group Specialised Trials Register (searched 6 May 2010), EMBASE (1 January 1996 to 6 May 2010), CINAHL (1 January 1982 to 10 May 2010), PEDro (January 2009), the UK National Research Register (January 2009), ClinicalTrials.gov (April 2009), Current Controlled Trials register (April 2009), CENTRAL (Issue 1, 2009) and ZETOC (January 2009) and the reference lists of relevant articles.

Selection criteria

Randomised and quasi-randomised trials in women with pelvic organ prolapse that included a physical or lifestyle intervention in at least one arm of the trial.

Data collection and analysis

Two reviewers assessed all trials for inclusion/exclusion and methodological quality. Data were extracted by the lead reviewer onto a standard form and cross checked by another. Disagreements were resolved by discussion. Data were processed as described in the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions.

Main results

Six trials were included; three of these trials are new to this update. Four trials were small (less than 25 women per arm) and two had moderate to high risk of bias. Four trials compared PFMT as a treatment for prolapse against a control group (n = 857 women); two trials included women having surgery for prolapse and compared PFMT as an adjunct to surgery versus surgery alone (n = 118 women).

PFMT versus control

There was a significant risk of bias in two out four trials in this comparison. Prolapse symptoms and women's reports of treatment outcomes (primary outcomes) were measured differently in the three trials where this was reported: all three indicated greater improvement in symptoms in the PFMT group compared to the control group. Pooling data on severity of prolapse from two trials indicated that PFMT increases the chance of an improvement in prolapse stage by 17% compared to no PFMT. The two trials which measured pelvic floor muscle function found better function (or improvement in function) in the PFMT group compared to the control group; measurements were not known to be blinded. Two out of three trials which measured urinary outcomes (urodynamics, frequency and bother of symptoms, or symptom score) reported differences between groups in favour of the PFMT group. One trial reported bowel outcomes, showing less frequency and bother with symptoms in the PFMT group compared to the control group.

PFMT supplementing surgery versus surgery alone

Both trials were small and neither measured prolapse-specific outcomes. Pelvic floor muscle function findings differed between the trials: one found no difference between trial groups in muscle strength, whilst the other found a benefit for the PFMT group in terms of stronger muscles. Similarly findings relating to urinary outcomes were contradictory: one trial found no difference in symptom score change between groups, whilst the other found more improvement in urinary symptoms and a reduction in diurnal frequency in the PFMT group compared to the control group.

Authors' conclusions

There is now some evidence available indicating a positive effect of PFMT for prolapse symptoms and severity. The largest most rigorous trial to date suggests that six months of supervised PFMT has benefits in terms of anatomical and symptom improvement (if symptomatic) immediately post-intervention. Further evidence relating to effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of PFMT, of different intensities, for symptomatic prolapse in the medium and long term is needed. A large trial of PFMT supplementing surgery is needed to give clear evidence about the usefulness of combining these treatments. Other comparisons which have not been addressed in trials to date and warrant consideration include those involving lifestyle change interventions, and trials aimed at prolapse prevention.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Conservative management of pelvic organ prolapse in women

Pelvic organs, such as the uterus, cervix, bladder or bowel, may protrude into the vagina because of weakness in the tissues that normally support them. The symptoms that they cause vary, depending on the type of prolapse. Conservative methods, such as pelvic floor muscle training (exercises to improve the pelvic floor muscles) or lifestyle changes (for example, avoiding lifting or losing weight), are commonly recommended for prolapse. The review looked for randomised trials of conservative methods, either to prevent or treat prolapse, from which to judge their effects.

Six trials were included. Four trials compared pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) with no intervention, and two trials compared pelvic floor muscle training plus surgery to surgery alone. PFMT compared to no intervention was found in individual trials to improve prolapse symptoms, but data could not be combined. Data on prolapse severity was combined from two trials and results indicated that PFMT increases the chance of improvement in prolapse stage by 17% compared to no treatment. Pelvic floor muscle function appeared to be improved in women who received PFMT in the two trials which measured this. Bladder symptoms were improved with PFMT in two out of three trials measuring this; bowel symptoms were measured in one trial, and an improvement with PFMT was found.

The two trials which looked at the benefit of PFMT in addition to surgery, were small but of good quality. Findings were contradictory: women benefited from PFMT, in terms of urinary symptoms and pelvic floor muscle strength, in one trial but not the other.

The evidence from the trials suggests there is some benefit from conservative treatment of prolapse, specifically for PFMT as compared to no intervention. More randomised controlled trials are still needed to look at different regimens of PFMT, the cost in relation to benefit, and the long-term effects. The combination of PFMT and surgery requires to be evaluated in a large randomised trial. There is a dearth of trials addressing lifestyle changes as a treatment for prolapse, and trials aimed at prevention of prolapse. Trials of one type of conservative intervention versus another, and combinations of conservative interventions, are also lacking.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Contexte

Le prolapsus des organes pelviens est une affection courante et certaines formes de prolapsus surviennent chez 50 % des femmes ayant déjà eu des enfants. Les femmes souffrant d’un prolapsus peuvent ressentir plusieurs symptômes au niveau du plancher pelvien. Des interventions chirurgicales, des dispositifs mécaniques et la prise en charge conservatrice font partie des traitements utilisés. Les approches pour une prise en charge conservatrice, comme des conseils sur le mode de vie et une formation sur les exercices de renforcement des muscles du plancher pelvien (PFMT pour « Pelvic Floor Muscle Training »), sont souvent utilisées dans les cas d’un prolapsus léger à modéré. Cette revue est une mise à jour d’une revue Cochrane publiée pour la première fois en 2004 et précédemment mise à jour en 2006.

Objectifs

Déterminer les effets de la prise en charge conservatrice (interventions sur le physique et le mode de vie) pour la prévention ou le traitement du prolapsus des organes pelviens comparés à l’absence de traitement ou d’autres options thérapeutiques (dispositifs mécaniques ou chirurgie).

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur l’incontinence (recherche du 6 mai 2010), EMBASE (1er janvier 1996 au 6 mai 2010), CINAHL (1er janvier 1982 au 10 mai 2010), PEDRO (janvier 2009), le registre UK National Research Register (janvier 2009), ClinicalTrials.gov (avril 2009), le registre d’essais cliniques (avril 2009), CENTRAL (numéro 1, 2009) et ZETOC (janvier 2009), ainsi que dans les listes bibliographiques des articles pertinents..

Critères de sélection

Des essais randomisés et quasi-randomisés réalisés sur des femmes souffrant d’un prolapsus des organes pelviens incluant une intervention sur le physique ou le mode de vie dans au moins un bras de l’essai.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux relecteurs ont évalué tous les essais à inclure/exclure, ainsi que la qualité méthodologique. Des données ont été extraites par le relecteur principal dans un format standard et recoupées par un autre. Des discussions ont permis de résoudre des désaccords. Les données ont été traitées comme décrit dans le guide Cochrane sur les revues systématiques des interventions (Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions).

Résultats Principaux

Six essais ont été inclus ; dont trois ont été ajoutés à cette mise à jour. Quatre essais étaient réalisés à petite échelle (moins de 25 femmes par bras) et deux présentaient des risques de biais modérés à élevés. Quatre essais comparaient la formation PFMT comme traitement du prolapsus par rapport à un groupe témoin (n = 857 femmes) ; deux essais étaient composés de femmes subissant une opération chirurgicale du prolapsus et comparaient la formation PFMT comme traitement adjuvant à la chirurgie par rapport à la chirurgie seule (n = 118 femmes)..

Formation PFMT et groupe témoin

Les risques de biais étaient importants dans deux des quatre essais de cette comparaison. Les symptômes du prolapsus et les notifications des femmes relatives aux résultats du traitement (résultats principaux) étaient mesurés différemment dans les trois essais où ils ont été signalés : tous les trois indiquaient une nette amélioration des symptômes dans le groupe suivant une formation PFMT par rapport au groupe témoin. Le regroupement de données portant sur la gravité du prolapsus issues de deux essais indiquait que la formation PFMT augmente les chances d’amélioration du prolapsus de 17 % par rapport à l’absence de formation PFMT. Les deux essais qui mesuraient la fonction des muscles du plancher pelvien constataient une meilleure fonction (ou une amélioration de la fonction) dans le groupe suivant une formation PFMT par rapport au groupe témoin ; les mesures n’étaient pas masquées à notre connaissance. Deux essais sur trois mesurant des résultats urinaires (bilan urodynalmique, fréquence et gène des symptômes ou score des symptômes) signalaient des différences entres les groupes en faveur du groupe suivant une formation PFMT. Un essai signalait des résultats au niveau des intestins, révélant une diminution de la fréquence et des gènes des symptômes dans le groupe suivant une formation PFMT par rapport au groupe témoin.

Formation PFMT utilisée en complément d’une opération chirurgicale et opération chirurgicale seule

Les deux essais étaient réalisés à petite échelle et aucun ne mesurait des résultats spécifiques au prolapsus. Les découvertes relatives à la fonction des muscles du plancher pelvien différaient entre les essais : un ne révélait aucune différence entre les groupes d’essais au niveau de la force musculaire, alors que l’autre signalait un effet bénéfique pour le groupe suivant une formation PFMT en termes de renforcement musculaire. De même, des découvertes concernant les résultats urinaires étaient contradictoires : un essai ne révélait aucune différence au niveau des modifications des scores des symptômes entre les groupes, alors que l’autre signalait une nette amélioration des symptômes urinaires et une diminution de la fréquence diurne dans le groupe suivant une formation PFMT par rapport au groupe témoin.

Conclusions des auteurs

À l’heure actuelle, il existe des preuves indiquant un effet positif de la formation PFMT pour le traitement des symptômes et de la gravité du prolapsus. L’essai le plus rigoureux et le plus étendu réalisé à ce jour révèle que six mois de formation PFMT supervisés présente des effets bénéfiques en termes d’amélioration anatomique et symptomatique (le cas échéant) peu après une intervention. D’autres preuves sont requises pour démontrer l’efficacité et le rapport cout/efficacité de la formation PFMT, à des niveaux différents, pour le traitement du prolapsus symptomatique à moyen et long terme. Un essai réalisé à grande échelle portant sur la formation PFMT utilisée en complément de la chirurgie doit être réalisé afin d’obtenir des preuves irréfutables sur l’utilité de la combinaison de ces traitements. D’autres comparaisons qui n’ont pas été effectuées dans des essais à ce jour, ainsi que d’autres considérations requises, incluent celles portant sur des interventions liées au changement de mode de vie, ainsi que des essais ayant pour objectif la prévention du prolapsus.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st January, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Prise en charge conservatrice du prolapsus des organes pelviens chez les femmes

Les organes pelviens, comme l’utérus, le col de l’utérus, la vessie ou les intestins, peuvent déborder à l’intérieur vagin en raison d’un affaiblissement des tissus qui les soutiennent habituellement. Leurs symptômes varient selon le type de prolapsus. Les méthodes conservatrices, comme les exercices de renforcement des muscles du plancher pelvien (exercices visant à améliorer les muscles du plancher pelvien) ou des changements appliqués au mode de vie (par exemple, éviter de soulever ou de perdre du poids), sont généralement recommandées en cas de prolapsus. Cette revue a étudié des essais randomisés portant sur des méthodes conservatrices, destinées à éviter ou à traiter un prolapsus, à partir desquelles leurs effets ont été évalués.

Six essais étaient inclus. Quatre essais comparaient les exercices de renforcement des muscles du plancher pelvien (PFMT pour « Pelvic Floor Muscle Training ») à l’absence d’intervention et deux essais comparaient les exercices de renforcement des muscles du plancher pelvien associés à une opération chirurgicale ou à une opération chirurgicale seule. Dans les essais individuels, la formation PFMT comparée à l’absence d’intervention a permis d’améliorer les symptômes du prolapsus, mais les données n’ont pu être combinées. Les données portant sur la gravité du prolapsus ont été combinées à partir de deux essais et ont indiqué que la formation PFMT augmente les chances d’amélioration du prolapsus de 17 % par rapport à l’absence de traitement. La fonction des muscles du plancher pelvien semblait s’améliorer chez les femmes ayant suivi une formation PFMT dans les deux essais mesurant ce résultat. Les symptômes urinaires se sont améliorés grâce à la formation PFMT dans deux des trois essais mesurant ce résultat ; les symptômes intestinaux ont été évalués dans un essai et la formation PFMT a permis de les améliorer.

Les deux essais étudiant les effets bénéfiques de la formation PFMT utilisée en complément d’une opération chirurgicale étaient réalisés à petite échelle, mais leur qualité était satisfaisante. Leurs résultats étaient contradictoires : la formation PFMT se révélait bénéfique pour les femmes au niveau des symptômes urinaires et de la force des muscles du plancher pelvien, mais seulement dans un essai et pas dans l’autre.

Les preuves obtenues grâce à ces essais suggèrent l’existence d’effets bénéfiques du traitement conservatoire du prolapsus, plus particulièrement en ce qui concerne la formation PFMT comparée à l’absence d’intervention. Cependant, d’autres essais contrôlés randomisés sont requis pour observer les différents types de formation PFMT, le rapport coût/efficacité et les effets à long terme. La combinaison de la formation PFMT et d’une opération chirurgicale doit être évaluée dans le cadre d’un essai randomisé réalisé à grande échelle. Les essais portant sur les changements appliqués au mode de vie comme traitement du prolapsus sont insuffisants, ainsi que les essais destinés à la prévention du prolapsus. Les essais portant sur un type d’intervention conservatrice par rapport à un autre et les combinaisons d’interventions conservatrices sont également insuffisants.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st January, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français