Intervention Review

Orientation and mobility training for adults with low vision

  1. Gianni Virgili1,*,
  2. Gary Rubin2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group

Published Online: 12 MAY 2010

Assessed as up-to-date: 30 MAR 2010

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003925.pub3


How to Cite

Virgili G, Rubin G. Orientation and mobility training for adults with low vision. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2010, Issue 5. Art. No.: CD003925. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD003925.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Florence, Department of Specialised Surgical Sciences, Florence, Italy

  2. 2

    Institute of Ophthalmology, London, UK

*Gianni Virgili, Department of Specialised Surgical Sciences, University of Florence, Via le Morgagni 85, Florence, 50134, Italy. gianni.virgili@unifi.it.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 12 MAY 2010

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Orientation and mobility (O&M) training is provided to people who are visually impaired to help them maintain travel independence. It teaches them new orientation and mobility skills to compensate for reduced visual information.

Objectives

The objective of this review was to assess the effects of O&M training, with or without associated devices, for adults with low vision.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library, 2010, Issue 3), MEDLINE (January 1950 to March 2010), EMBASE (January 1980 to March 2010), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to March 2010), System for Information on Grey Literature in Europe (OpenSIGLE) (March 2010), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com) (March 2010), ClinicalTrials.gov (http://clinicaltrials.gov) (March 2010), ZETOC (March 2010) and the reference lists of retrieved articles. There were no language or date restrictions in the search for trials. The electronic databases were last searched on 31 March 2010.

Selection criteria

We planned to include randomised or quasi-randomised trials comparing O&M training with no training in adults with low vision.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently assessed the search results for eligibility, evaluated study quality and extracted the data.

Main results

Two small studies satisfied the inclusion criteria. They were consecutive phases of development of the same training curriculum and assessment tool. The intervention was administered by a volunteer on the basis of written and oral instruction. In both studies the randomisation technique was inadequate, being based on alternation, and masking was not achieved. Training had no effect in the first study but tended to be beneficial in the second but not to a statistically significant extent. Reasons for differences between studies may have been: the high scores obtained in the first study, suggestive of little need for training and small room for further improvement (a ceiling effect), and the refinement of the curriculum allowing better tailoring to patients' specific needs and characteristics, in the second study.

Authors' conclusions

The review found two small quasi-randomised trials with similar methods, comparing training to physical exercise and assessing O&M physical performance by means of a volunteer or a professional, which were unable to demonstrate a difference. Therefore, there is little evidence on which type of O&M training is better for people with low vision who have specific characteristics and needs. Orientation and mobility instructors and scientists should plan randomised controlled trials (RCTs) to compare the effectiveness of different types of O&M training. A consensus is needed on the adoption of standard measurement instruments of mobility performance which are proven to be reliable and sensitive to the diverse mobility needs of people with low vision. For this purpose, questionnaires and performance-based tests may represent different tools that explore people with low vision's subjective experience or their objective functioning, respectively. In fact, it has to be observed that low vision rehabilitation research is increasingly shifting towards the use of quality of life questionnaires as an outcome measure, sometimes with the aim to study complex and multidisciplinary interventions including different types of education and support, of which O&M can be a component. An example of this is an ongoing cluster RCT conducted by Zijlstra et al. in The Netherlands. This trial is designed to compare standardised O&M training with usual O&M care not only for its effectiveness, but also its applicability and acceptability. This study adopts validated questionnaires for patients' subjective assessment of performance during activities of daily living. As performance assessment does not need to be made by an O&M trainer, this allows for masking of assessors and a patient-centred outcome measure.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Orientation and mobility training for people with low vision

Progressive visual impairment often affects people as they age. Training is used to help people with low vision maintain travel independence, with new orientation and mobility skills to compensate for reduced visual information. Orientation is the ability to recognise one's position in relation to the environment, whereas mobility is the ability to move around safely and efficiently. Orientation and mobility (O&M) training teaches people to use their remaining vision and other senses to get around. Canes and optical aids may also be used.

We found two small studies with a total of 63 people comparing O&M training delivered by a trained volunteer to physical exercise. These studies did not show a difference between the two interventions, but they had little power to do so because of the small sample size and poor methodological quality. There were no adverse effects of O&M training in these studies.

There is little evidence from randomised controlled trials on which type of O&M training is better for people with low vision who have specific characteristics and needs.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Formation en orientation et mobilité pour les adultes ayant une basse vision

Contexte

La formation en orientation et mobilité (O&M) est dispensée aux personnes présentant une déficience visuelle pour les aider à conserver leur autonomie de déplacement. Elle leur enseigne de nouvelles techniques d'orientation et de mobilité pour compenser les informations visuelles réduites.

Objectifs

L'objectif de cette revue était d'évaluer les effets de la formation O&M, avec ou sans dispositifs associés, chez des adultes ayant une basse vision.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (qui contient le registre des essais cliniques du groupe Cochrane sur l'œil et la vision) (The Cochrane Library, 2010, Numéro 3), MEDLINE (de janvier 1950 à mars 2010), EMBASE (de janvier 1980 à mars 2010), LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences) (de janvier 1982 à mars 2010), Système d'information sur la littérature grise en Europe (OpenSIGLE) (Mars 2010), le metaregistre des essais contrôlés (mREC) (www.controlled-trials.com) (Mars 2010), ClinicalTrials.gov (http://clinicaltrials.gov) (Mars 2010), ZETOC (Mars 2010) et dans les références bibliographiques des articles extraits. Aucune restriction concernant la langue ou la date de publication n'a été appliquée aux recherches d'essais. Les dernières recherches dans les bases de données électroniques ont été effectuées le 31 mars 2010.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons prévu d'inclure les essais randomisés ou quasi-randomisés comparant la formation O&M à l'absence de formation chez des adultes ayant une basse vision

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont examiné de manière indépendante les résultats des recherches pour l'inclusion des essais, évalué la qualité des études et extrait les données.

Résultats Principaux

Deux petites études répondaient aux critères d'inclusion. Il s'agissait des phases successives du développement du même programme de formation et outil d'évaluation. L'intervention a été assurée par un bénévole à partir d'instructions écrites et orales. Dans les deux études, la technique de randomisation s'est avérée inadéquate, dans la mesure où elle reposait sur l'alternance, et la mise en aveugle n'a pu être obtenue. La formation n'a eu aucun effet dans la première étude et avait tendance à être bénéfique dans la seconde, mais pas dans une mesure statistiquement significative. Les différences entre les études peuvent peut-être s'expliquer par les raisons suivantes : les scores élevés obtenus dans la première étude, qui suggèrent un besoin réduit en formation et laissent peu de place pour une amélioration ultérieure (effet plafond), et le fait d'avoir affiné le programme de formation, ce qui a permis une meilleure adaptation aux besoins et caractéristiques spécifiques des patients, dans la seconde étude.

Conclusions des auteurs

La revue a trouvé deux petits essais quasi-randomisés avec des méthodes similaires, comparant la formation à l'exercice physique et dans lesquels la performance physique O&M était évaluée par un bénévole ou un professionnel, qui n'ont pas pu démontrer de différence. C'est pourquoi, il existe peu de preuves permettant d'établir quel est le meilleur type de formation O&M pour les personnes atteintes de basse vision qui ont des caractéristiques et des besoins spécifiques. Les instructeurs en orientation et mobilité et les chercheurs devraient prévoir des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) pour comparer l'efficacité des différents types de formation O&M. Il est indispensable d'obtenir un consensus sur l'adoption d'instruments de mesure standard pour l'évaluation des performances de mobilité qui soient réputés fiables et sensibles aux divers besoins de mobilité des personnes ayant une basse vision. À cette fin, des questionnaires et des tests axés sur les performances peuvent constituer une panoplie d'outils permettant d'étudier respectivement l'expérience subjective des personnes ayant une basse vision ou leur fonctionnement objectif. En fait, il convient de souligner que la recherche sur la réadaptation des personnes ayant une basse vision se tourne de plus en plus vers l'utilisation de questionnaires sur la qualité de vie pour évaluer les résultats, parfois dans le but d'étudier des interventions complexes et multidisciplinaires, incluant différents types d'éducation et de soutien, dont l'O&M peut être une composante. L'ECR en grappes qui est actuellement mené par Zijlstra et al. aux Pays-Bas en est un exemple. Cet essai est conçu pour comparer une formation O&M normalisée avec une prise en charge O&M habituelle non seulement au plan de son efficacité, mais aussi au plan de son applicabilité et de son acceptabilité. Cette étude adopte des questionnaires validés pour l'évaluation subjective, par les patients, des performances au cours de leurs activités de la vie quotidienne. Comme l'évaluation des performances n'a pas besoin d'être effectuée par un formateur O&M, cela permet aux évaluateurs d'être en conditions d'insu et d'avoir une mesure des résultats centrée sur le patient.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Formation en orientation et mobilité pour les adultes ayant une basse vision

Formation en orientation et mobilité pour les personnes ayant une basse vision

Avec l'âge, les personnes sont souvent affectées par une déficience visuelle progressive. La formation permet d'aider les personnes ayant une basse vision à conserver leur autonomie de déplacement, par l'acquisition de nouvelles techniques d'orientation et de mobilité pour compenser les informations visuelles réduites. L'orientation est la capacité à reconnaître sa position par rapport à son environnement, alors que la mobilité est la capacité de se déplacer en toute sécurité et efficacement. La formation en orientation et mobilité (O&M) enseigne l'utilisation de la vision résiduelle et des autres sens pour se déplacer. Les cannes et les aides optiques peuvent également être utilisées.

Nous avons trouvé deux petites études portant sur un total de 63 personnes comparant la formation O&M dispensée par un bénévole formé à l'exercice physique. Ces études n'ont pas montré de différence entre les deux interventions, mais leur puissance à cet effet était limitée en raison de la petite taille d'échantillon et d'une qualité méthodologique médiocre. Il n'a été observé aucun effet indésirable lié à la formation O&M dans ces études.

Il existe peu de preuves issues d'essais contrôlés randomisés permettant d'établir quel est le meilleur type de formation O&M pour les personnes atteintes de basse vision qui ont des caractéristiques et des besoins spécifiques.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 21st March, 2013
Traduction financée par: Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Minist�re en charge de la Sant�