Intervention Review

Central venous access sites for the prevention of venous thrombosis, stenosis and infection

  1. Xiaoli Ge1,
  2. Rodrigo Cavallazzi2,
  3. Chunbo Li3,
  4. Shu Ming Pan1,*,
  5. Ying Wei Wang4,
  6. Fei-Long Wang1

Editorial Group: Cochrane Anaesthesia Group

Published Online: 14 MAR 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 28 SEP 2010

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004084.pub3


How to Cite

Ge X, Cavallazzi R, Li C, Pan SM, Wang YW, Wang FL. Central venous access sites for the prevention of venous thrombosis, stenosis and infection. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 3. Art. No.: CD004084. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004084.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Emergency Department, Shanghai, China

  2. 2

    Department of Medicine, University of Louisville, Division of Pulmonary, Critical Care and Sleep Medicine, Louisville, KY, USA

  3. 3

    Shanghai Mental Health Centre, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Department of Biological Psychiatry, Shanghai, China

  4. 4

    Xinhua Hospital,Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Department of Anesthesiology, Shanghai, China

*Shu Ming Pan, Emergency Department, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, 1665 Kong Jiang Road, Shanghai, 200092, China. shumingpan@yahoo.com.cn.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (conclusions changed)
  2. Published Online: 14 MAR 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Resumo
  7. Resumo para leigos

Background

Central venous access (CVA) is widely used. However, its thrombotic, stenotic and infectious complications can be life-threatening and involve high-cost therapy. Research revealed that the risk of catheter-related complications varied according to the site of CVA. It would be helpful to find the preferred site of insertion to minimize the risk of catheter-related complications. This review was originally published in 2007 and was updated in 2011.

Objectives

1. Our primary objective was to establish whether the jugular, subclavian or femoral CVA routes resulted in a lower incidence of venous thrombosis, venous stenosis or infections related to CVA devices in adult patients.

2. Our secondary objective was to assess whether the jugular, subclavian or femoral CVA routes influenced the incidence of catheter-related mechanical complications in adult patients; and the reasons why patients left the studies early.

Search methods

We searched CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 9), MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE (from inception to September 2011), four Chinese databases (CBM, WANFANG DATA, CAJD, VIP Database) (from inception to November 2011), Google Scholar and bibliographies of published reviews. The original search was performed in December 2006. We also contacted researchers in the field. There were no language restrictions.

Selection criteria

We included randomized controlled trials comparing central venous catheter insertion routes.

Data collection and analysis

Three authors assessed potentially relevant studies independently. We resolved disagreements by discussion. Dichotomous data on catheter-related complications were analysed. We calculated relative risks (RR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) based on a random-effects model.

Main results

We identified 5854 citations from the initial search strategy; 28 references were then identified as potentially relevant. Of these, we Included four studies with data from 1513 participants. We undertook a priori subgroup analysis according to the duration of catheterization, short-term (< one month) and long-term (> one month) defined according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

No randomized controlled trial (RCT) was found comparing all three CVA routes and reporting the complications of venous stenosis.

Regarding internal jugular versus subclavian CVA routes, the evidence was moderate and applicable for long-term catheterization in cancer patients. Subclavian and internal jugular CVA routes had similar risks for catheter-related complications. Regarding femoral versus subclavian CVA routes, the evidence was high and applicable for short-term catheterization in critically ill patients. Subclavian CVA routes were preferable to femoral CVA routes in short-term catheterization because femoral CVA routes were associated with higher risks of catheter colonization (14.18% or 19/134 versus 2.21% or 3/136) (n = 270, one RCT, RR 6.43, 95% CI 1.95 to 21.21) and thrombotic complications (21.55% or 25/116 versus 1.87% or 2/107) (n = 223, one RCT, RR 11.53, 95% CI 2.80 to 47.52) than with subclavian CVA routes. Regarding femoral versus internal jugular routes, the evidence was moderate and applicable for short-term haemodialysis catheterization in critically ill patients. No significant differences were found between femoral and internal jugular CVA routes in catheter colonization, catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) and thrombotic complications, but fewer mechanical complications occurred in femoral CVA routes (4.86% or 18/370 versus 9.56% or 35/366) (n = 736, one RCT, RR 0.51, 95% CI 0.29 to 0.88).

Authors' conclusions

Subclavian and internal jugular CVA routes have similar risks for catheter-related complications in long-term catheterization in cancer patients. Subclavian CVA is preferable to femoral CVA in short-term catheterization because of lower risks of catheter colonization and thrombotic complications. In short-term haemodialysis catheterization, femoral and internal jugular CVA routes have similar risks for catheter-related complications except internal jugular CVA routes are associated with higher risks of mechanical complications.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Resumo
  7. Resumo para leigos

Central venous access sites to prevent venous blood clots, blood vessel narrowing, and infection

Central venous access (CVA) involves a large bore catheter inserted in a vein in the neck, upper chest or groin (femoral) area to give drugs that cannot be given by mouth or via a conventional needle (cannula or tube in the arm). CVA is widely used. However, its thrombotic (causing a blood clot) and infectious complications can be life-threatening and involve high-cost therapy. Research has revealed that the risk of catheter-related complications varies according to the sites of central venous catheter (CVC) insertion. It would be helpful to find the preferred site of insertion to minimize the risk of catheter-related complications. This review examined whether there was any evidence to show that CVA through any one site (neck, upper chest, or femoral area) is better than the other. Four studies were identified comparing data from 1513 participants. For the purpose of this review, three comparisons were evaluated: 1) internal jugular versus subclavian CVA routes; 2) femoral versus subclavian CVA routes; and 3) femoral versus internal jugular CVA routes. We compared short-term and long-term catheter insertion. We defined long-term as for more than one month and short-term as for less than one month, according to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). No randomized controlled trial was found comparing all three CVA routes and reporting the complications of venous stenosis.

Subclavian and internal jugular CVA routes had similar risks for catheter-related complications in long-term catheter insertion in cancer patients. Subclavian CVA was preferable to femoral CVA in short-term catheter insertion because of lower risks of catheter colonization and thrombotic complications. In catheter insertion for short-term haemodialysis, femoral and internal jugular CVA routes had similar risks for catheter-related complications except internal jugular CVA routes were associated with higher risks of mechanical complications. Further trials comparing subclavian, femoral and jugular CVA routes are needed.

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Resumo
  7. Resumo para leigos

Sites d'accès veineux central pour la prévention de la thrombose veineuse, de la sténose et de l'infection

Contexte

L'accès veineux central (AVC) est largement utilisé. Cependant, ses complications liées à une thrombose, une sténose ou une infection peuvent mettre en jeu le pronostic vital et impliquer un traitement coûteux. Les recherches ont révélé que le risque de complications liées aux cathéters variait selon le site d'AVC. Il serait utile de déterminer le site d'insertion préféré pour minimiser le risque de complications liées aux cathéters. Cette revue a été publiée à l'origine en 2007 et a été mise à jour en 2011.

Objectifs

1. Notre objectif principal était d'établir si les voies d'AVC jugulaires, sous-clavières ou fémorales entraînaient une incidence plus faible de la thrombose veineuse, de la sténose veineuse ou des infections liées aux dispositifs d'AVC chez les patients adultes.

2. Notre objectif secondaire était de déterminer si les voies d'AVC jugulaires, sous-clavières ou fémorales avaient un effet sur l'incidence des complications mécaniques liées aux cathéters chez les patients adultes et de déterminer les raisons pour lesquelles les patients se retiraient des études prématurément.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans les bases de données CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2011, numéro 9), MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE (des origines à septembre 2011), dans quatre bases de données chinoises (les bases de données CBM, WANFANG DATA, CAJD et VIP) (des origines à novembre 2011), dans Google Scholar et dans les bibliographies des revues publiées. La recherche originale a été réalisée en décembre 2006. Nous avons également contacté des chercheurs dans le domaine. Il n'y avait aucune restriction concernant la langue.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés comparant les voies d'insertion de cathéters veineux centraux.

Recueil et analyse des données

Trois auteurs ont évalué les études potentiellement pertinentes de manière indépendante. Nous avons résolu les désaccords par des discussions. Les données dichotomiques sur les complications liées aux cathéters ont été analysées. Nous avons calculé les risques relatifs (RR) et leurs intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95 % au moyen d'un modèle à effets aléatoires.

Résultats principaux

Nous avons identifié 5 854 références bibliographiques à partir de la stratégie de recherche initiale ; 28 références ont ensuite été identifiées comme potentiellement pertinentes. Parmi celles-ci, nous avons inclus quatre études fournissant des données sur 1 513 participants. Nous avons entrepris une analyse par sous-groupes a priori en fonction de la durée de cathétérisation, à court terme (< un mois) et à long terme (> un mois), telle que définie par la Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Aucun essai contrôlé randomisé (ECR) comparant les trois voies d'AVC et rapportant les complications de sténose veineuse n'a été trouvé.

Concernant les voies d'AVC jugulaires internes versus sous-clavières, les preuves étaient modérées et applicables à la cathétérisation à long terme chez les patients cancéreux. Les voies d'AVC sous-clavières et jugulaires internes présentaient des risques similaires de complications liées aux cathéters. Concernant les voies d'AVC fémorales versus sous-clavières, les preuves étaient importantes et applicables à la cathétérisation à court terme chez les patients en phase critique. Les voies d'AVC sous-clavières étaient préférables aux voies d'AVC fémorales dans les cas de cathétérisation à court terme, car les voies d'AVC fémorales étaient associées à des risques plus élevés de colonisation des cathéters (14,18 % ou 19/134 versus 2,21 % ou 3/136) (n = 270, un ECR, RR 6,43, IC à 95 % 1,95 à 21,21) et de complications thrombotiques (21,55 % ou 25/116 versus 1,87 % ou 2/107) (n = 223, un ECR, RR 11,53, IC à 95 % 2,80 à 47,52) qu'avec les voies d'AVC sous-clavières. Concernant les voies d'AVC fémorales versus jugulaires internes, les preuves étaient modérées et applicables à la cathétérisation d'hémodialyse à court terme chez les patients en phase critique. Aucune différence significative n'a été constatée entre les voies d'AVC fémorales et jugulaires internes en termes de colonisation des cathéters, d'infection du courant sanguin liée au cathéter (ICSC) et de complications thrombotiques, mais moins de complications mécaniques sont survenues avec les voies d'AVC fémorales (4,86 % ou 18/370 versus 9,56 % ou 35/366) (n = 736, un ECR, RR 0,51, IC à 95 % 0,29 à 0,88).

Conclusions des auteurs

Les voies d'AVC sous-clavières et jugulaires internes présentaient des risques similaires de complications liées au cathéter dans les cas de cathétérisation à long terme chez les patients cancéreux. L'AVC sous-clavier est préférable à l'AVC fémoral dans les cas de cathétérisation à court terme en raison de risques plus faibles de colonisation du cathéter et de complications thrombotiques. Dans les cas de cathétérisation pour hémodialyse à court terme, les voies d'AVC fémorales et jugulaires internes présentent des risques similaires de complications liées aux cathéters, si ce n'est que les voies d'AVC jugulaires internes sont associées à des risques plus importants de complications mécaniques.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Resumo
  7. Resumo para leigos

Sites d'accès veineux central pour prévenir les caillots sanguins veineux, le rétrécissement des vaisseaux sanguins et l'infection

L'accès veineux central (AVC) implique un cathéter de gros diamètre inséré dans une veine du cou, du thorax ou de l'aine (fémorale) afin d'administrer des médicaments qui ne peuvent pas être administrés par voie orale ou par une aiguille conventionnelle (canule ou tube dans le bras). L'AVC est largement utilisé. Cependant, ses complications thrombotiques (provoquant un caillot sanguin) et infectieuses peuvent mettre en jeu le pronostic vital et impliquer un traitement coûteux. Les recherches ont révélé que le risque de complications liées aux cathéters variait selon les sites d'insertion des cathéters veineux centraux (CVC). Il serait utile de déterminer le site d'insertion préféré pour minimiser le risque de complications liées aux cathéters. Cette revue a examiné les preuves éventuelles indiquant qu'un AVC par un site (cou, thorax ou région fémorale) était meilleur qu'un autre. Quatre études comparant des données portant sur 1 513 patients ont été identifiées. Pour cette revue, trois comparaisons ont été évaluées : 1) voies d'AVC jugulaires internes versus sous-clavières ; 2) voies d'AVC fémorales versus sous-clavières ; et 3) voies d'AVC fémorales versus jugulaires internes. Nous avons comparé l'insertion de cathéter à court terme et à long terme. Nous avons défini le long terme comme une durée supérieure à un mois et le court terme comme une durée inférieure à un mois, conformément à la définition de la Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Aucun essai contrôlé randomisé comparant les trois voies d'AVC et rapportant les complications de sténose veineuse n'a été trouvé.

Les voies d'AVC sous-clavières et jugulaires internes présentaient des risques similaires de complications liées aux cathéters dans les cas d'insertion de cathéter à long terme chez les patients cancéreux. L'AVC sous-clavier était préférable à l'AVC fémoral dans les cas d'insertion de cathéter à court terme en raison de risques plus faibles de colonisation du cathéter et de complications thrombotiques. Dans les cas d'insertion de cathéter pour l'hémodialyse à court terme, les voies d'AVC fémorales et jugulaires internes présentaient des risques similaires de complications liées aux cathéters, si ce n'est que les voies d'AVC jugulaires internes étaient associées à des risques plus importants de complications mécaniques. Des essais supplémentaires comparant les voies d'AVC sous-clavières, fémorales et jugulaires sont nécessaires.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 18th May, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français

 

Resumo

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Resumo
  7. Resumo para leigos

Locais de acesso venoso central para a prevenção de trombose venosa, estenose e infecção

Introdução

O acesso venoso central (AVeC) é amplamente usado. No entanto, suas complicações como a trombose, a estenose e as infecções podem ser fatais e envolver um tratamento de custo elevado. Pesquisas revelaram que o risco de complicações relacionadas ao cateter variam de acordo com o local do AVeC. Seria útil determinar o local preferido para inserção para minimizar o risco de ocorrência de complicações relacionadas ao cateter. Esta revisão foi originalmente publicada em 2007 e foi atualizada em 2011.

Objetivos

1. Nosso objetivo primário foi estabelecer se alguma das vias de AVeC, jugular, subclávia ou femoral, resultou em menor incidência de trombose venosa, estenose venosa ou infecção relacionada aos dispositivos de AVeC em pacientes adultos.

2. Nosso objetivo secundário foi avaliar se alguma das vias de AVeC, jugular, subclávia ou femoral, influenciou a incidência de complicações mecânicas relacionadas ao cateter em pacientes adultos; e por quais razões os pacientes abandonaram o estudo precocemente.

Métodos de busca

Pesquisamos na CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library, 2011, fascículo 9), MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE (desde seu início até Setembro de 2011), quatro banco de dados chineses (CBM, WANFANG DATA, CAJD, VIP) (desde seu início até Novembro de 2011), Google Scholar e bibliografias de revisões publicadas. A busca original foi realizada em Dezembro de 2006. Também contatamos pesquisadores do assunto. Não houve restrição de idiomas.

Critério de seleção

Incluímos ensaios clínicos randomizados comparando as vias de inserção de cateter venoso central.

Coleta dos dados e análises

Três autores avaliaram independentemente os estudos potencialmente relevantes. Foram resolvidas discrepâncias por meio de discussões. Dados dicotômicos de complicações relacionadas ao cateter foram analisados. Calculamos o risco relativo (RR) e seus intervalos de confiança (IC) de 95% baseado em modelo de efeito randômico.

Principais resultados

Identificamos 5.854 títulos a partir da estratégia de busca inicial; 28 títulos foram então identificados como potencialmente relevantes. Destes, incluímos quatro estudos com dados de 1.513 participantes. Conduzimos inicialmente uma análise de subgrupo de acordo com a duração da cateterização, aguda (< um mês) ou crônica (> um mês), definida de acordo com o Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Nenhum ensaio clínico randomizado (ECR) foi identificado comparando as três vias de AVeC e relatando complicações de estenose venosa.

Em relação ao AVeC pela via jugular interna versus a via subclávia, as evidências apresentaram-se moderadas e aplicáveis para a cateterização crônica em pacientes oncológicos. As vias subclávia e jugular interna de AVeC apresentaram riscos similares de complicações relacionadas ao cateter. Referente a via femoral de AVeC versus a subclávia, as evidências foram altas e, também, aplicáveis para a cateterização aguda em pacientes criticamente enfermos. A via subclávia de AVeC foi preferível à femoral em cateterização aguda porque a via femoral foi associada com maiores riscos de colonização do cateter (14,18% ou 19/134 versus 2,21% ou 3/136) (n = 270, um ECR, RR 6,43, 95% IC 1,95 a 21,21) e complicações trombóticas (21,55% ou 25/116 versus 1,87% ou 2/107) (n = 223, um ECR, RR 11,53, 95% IC 2,80 a 47,52) do que a via subclávia de AVeC. Em relação a via femoral versus via jugular interna, as evidências apresentaram-se moderadas e aplicáveis para a cateterização aguda para hemodiálise em pacientes criticamente enfermos. Não houve diferenças significativas entre a via femoral de AVeC e a via jugular interna em termos de colonização do cateter, bacteremia relacionada ao cateter e trombose venosa, entretanto houve uma menor ocorrência de complicações mecânicas pela via femoral de AVeC (4,86% ou 18/370 versus 9,56% ou 35/366) (n = 736, um RCT, RR 0,51, 95% IC 0,29 a 0,88).

Conclusão dos autores

As vias subclávia e jugular interna de AVeC apresentam riscos similares para complicações relacionadas ao cateter em cateterização crônica em pacientes oncológicos. A via subclávia de AVeC é preferível à via femoral em cateterização aguda devido ao menor risco de colonização do cateter e de complicações trombóticas. Em cateterização aguda para hemodiálise, as vias femoral e jugular interna têm riscos similares para complicações relacionadas ao cateter, mas a via jugular interna está associada com maior risco de complicações mecânicas.

 

Resumo para leigos

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Resumo
  7. Resumo para leigos

Locais de acesso venoso central para a prevenção de coágulo sanguíneo venoso, estreitamento do vaso sanguíneo e infecção

O acesso venoso central (AVeC) envolve um cateter de grosso calibre inserido em uma veia no pescoço, na parte superior do tórax ou na área da virilha (femoral) para administrar fármacos que não podem ser administradas por boca ou por acesso venoso convencional (cânula ou tubo em veia do braço). O AVeC é amplamente empregado. No entanto, suas complicações trombóticas (causando um coágulo sanguíneo) e infecciosas podem ser fatais e envolver um tratamento de custo elevado. Pesquisas têm revelado que os riscos de complicações relacionadas ao cateter variam de acordo com o local de inserção do cateter venoso central (CVC). Seria útil determinar um local preferível de inserção do cateter que minimizasse o risco de complicações relacionadas ao cateter. Esta revisão examinou a possibilidade de existência de evidências mostrando que o AVeC por alguma via (pescoço, parte superior do tórax, ou área femoral) é melhor do que outra via. Quatro estudos foram identificados, comparando dados de 1.513 participantes. Para o propósito desta revisão, três comparações foram avaliadas: 1) via jugular interna de AVeC versus via subclávia; 2) via femoral de AVeC versus subclávia; e 3) via femoral de AVeC versus via jugular interna. Comparamos cateterização aguda com cateterização crônica. Definimos cateterização crônica como aquela por mais de um mês e aguda como aquela por menos de um mês, de acordo com o Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Não encontramos ensaios clínicos randomizados comparando todas as três vias de AVeC e relatando complicações de estenose venosa.

As vias subclávia e jugular interna de AVeC tiveram riscos similares para complicações relacionadas ao cateter em cateterização crônica em pacientes oncológicos. A via subclávia de AVeC foi preferível à via femoral em cateterização aguda devido aos menores riscos de colonização do cateter e complicações trombóticas. Em inserção de cateter para hemodiálise aguda, as vias femoral de AVeC e jugular interna tiveram riscos similares para complicações relacionadas ao cateter, mas a via jugular interna foi associada com maior risco de complicações mecânicas. Mais ensaios clínicos comparando as vias subclávia, femoral e jugular de AVeC são necessários.

Notas de tradução

Traduzido por: Paulo do Nascimento Jr, Unidade de Medicina Baseada em Evidências da Unesp, Brasil Contato:portuguese.ebm.unit@gmail.com