This is not the most recent version of the article. View current version (26 AUG 2013)

Intervention Review

Electrotherapy for neck pain

  1. Peter Kroeling1,*,
  2. Anita Gross2,
  3. Charles H Goldsmith3,
  4. Stephen J Burnie4,
  5. Ted Haines5,
  6. Nadine Graham6,
  7. Aron Brant7

Editorial Group: Cochrane Back Group

Published Online: 7 OCT 2009

Assessed as up-to-date: 14 JUN 2009

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004251.pub4


How to Cite

Kroeling P, Gross A, Goldsmith CH, Burnie SJ, Haines T, Graham N, Brant A. Electrotherapy for neck pain. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2009, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD004251. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004251.pub4.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Dept. of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (Director: Prof. Dr. Gerold Stucki), D-81377 München, Germany

  2. 2

    McMaster University, School of Rehabilitation Science & Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

  3. 3

    Simon Fraser University, Faculty of Health Sciences, Burnaby, BC, Canada

  4. 4

    Canadian Memorial Chiropractic College, Department of Clinical Education, Toronto, ON, Canada

  5. 5

    McMaster University, Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

  6. 6

    McMaster University, School of Rehabilitation Science, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

  7. 7

    McMaster University, Hamilton, Canada

*Peter Kroeling, Dept. of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation (Director: Prof. Dr. Gerold Stucki), Ludwig-Maximilians-University of Munich, Marchionini-Str. 17, D-81377 München, D-80801, Germany. kroeling@med.uni-muenchen.de.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 7 OCT 2009

SEARCH

This is not the most recent version of the article. View current version (26 AUG 2013)

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Neck pain is common, disabling and costly. The effectiveness of electrotherapy as a physiotherapeutic option remains unclear. This update replaces our 2005 Cochrane review on this topic.

Objectives

To assess whether electrotherapy improves pain, disability, patient satisfaction, and global perceived effect in adults with neck pain.

Search methods

Computer-assisted searches of: CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, MANTIS, CINAHL, and ICL, without language restrictions, from their beginning to December 2008; handsearched relevant conference proceedings; consulted content experts.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials in any language, investigating the effects of electrotherapy, used primarily as unimodal treatment for neck pain. Quasi-RCTs and controlled clinical trials were excluded.

Data collection and analysis

At least two authors independently conducted citation identification, study selection, data abstraction, and risk of bias assessment. We were unable to statistically pool any of the results, but assessed the quality of the evidence using an adapted GRADE approach.

Main results

Eighteen small trials (1043 people with neck pain) with 23 comparisons were included. Analysis was limited by trials of varied quality, heterogeneous treatment subtypes and conflicting results. The main findings for reduction of neck pain by treatment with electrotherapeutic modalities are:

Very low quality evidence that pulsed electromagnetic field therapy (PEMF), repetitive magnetic stimulation (rMS) and transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) are more effective than placebo.

Low quality evidence that permanent magnets (necklace) are not more effective than placebo.

Very low quality evidence that modulated galvanic current, iontophoresis and electric muscle stimulation (EMS) are not more effective than placebo.

There were only four trials that reported on other outcomes such as function and global perceived effects, but none were of clinical importance.

Authors' conclusions

We cannot make any definite statements on the efficacy and clinical usefulness of electrotherapy modalities for neck pain. Since the quality of evidence is low or very low, we are uncertain about the estimate of the effect. Further research is very likely to change both the estimate of effect and our confidence in the results. Current evidence for PEMF, rMS, and TENS shows that these modalities might be more effective than placebo but not other interventions. Funding bias should be considered, especially in PEMF studies.  Galvanic current, iontophoresis, electric muscle stimulation(EMS), and static magnetic field did not reduce pain or disability. Future trials on these interventions should have larger patient samples and include more precise standardization and description of all treatment characteristics.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Electrotherapy for neck pain

Neck pain is common, disabling and costly. Electrotherapy is an umbrella term that covers a number of therapies that aim to reduce pain and improve muscle tension and function.

This updated review included 18 small trials (1043 people). The results of the trials could not be pooled because they examined different populations, types and doses of electrotherapy, and comparison treatments and measured slightly different outcomes.  

We cannot make any definitive statements about the efficacy of electrotherapy for neck pain because of the low or very low quality of the evidence for each outcome, which in most cases, was based on the results of only one trial. 

For patients with acute neck pain, TENS possibly relieved pain better than electrical muscle stimulation, not as well as exercise and infrared and as well as manual therapy and ultrasound. There was no additional benefit when added to infrared, hot packs and exercise, physiotherapy or a combination of a neck collar, exercise and pain medication.

For patients with acute whiplash, iontophoresis was no more effective than no treatment, interferential current or a combination of traction, exercise and massage for relieving neck pain with headache; pulsed electro-magnetic field was more effective than ‘standard care’.

For patients with chronic neck pain, TENS possibly relieved pain better than placebo and electrical muscle stimulation, not as well as exercise and infrared and possibly as well as manual therapy and ultrasound; pulsed electro-magnetic field was possibly better than placebo, galvanic current, and electrical muscle stimulation. Magnetic necklaces were no more effective than placebo for relieving pain; there was no additional benefit when electrical muscle stimulation was added to either mobilisation or manipulation.

For patients with myofascial neck pain, TENS, FREMS (variation of TENS) and repetitive magnetic stimulation seemed to relieve pain better than placebo.

While over half of the trials were assessed as having a low risk of bias, seven of them did not describe how their participants were randomised, eight did not conceal the treatment assignment, and 12 did not control co-interventions. The trials were very small, with a range of 16 to 336 participants. Sparse and imprecise data mean the results cannot be generalized to the broader population and contributes to the reduction in the quality of the evidence, which was low or very low for all results. Therefore, further research is very likely to change the results and our confidence in them.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

L'électrothérapie pour le traitement de la cervicalgie

Contexte

La cervicalgie est une affection fréquente, invalidante et coûteuse. L'efficacité de l'électrothérapie comme option de physiothérapie reste incertaine. Cette mise à jour remplace notre revue Cochrane de 2005 sur ce sujet.

Objectifs

Évaluer si l'électrothérapie améliore la douleur, l'invalidité, la satisfaction des patients et l'effet global perçu chez l'adulte souffrant de cervicalgie.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Recherches assistées par ordinateur dans : CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, MANTIS, CINAHL et ICL, sans restriction de langue, de leurs origines jusqu'à décembre 2008 ; recherche manuelle dans les actes de conférence pertinents ; consultation d'experts du sujet.

Critères de sélection

Des essais contrôlés randomisés en toute langue, examinant les effets de l'électrothérapie utilisée en mono-traitement primaire de la cervicalgie. Les essais contrôlés quasi-randomisés et les essais cliniques contrôlés ont été exclus.

Recueil et analyse des données

Au moins deux auteurs ont effectué, de manière indépendante, l'identification des références, la sélection des études, l'extraction des données et l'évaluation du risque de biais. Nous n'avons pu regrouper statistiquement aucuns résultats, mais nous avons évalué la qualité des données à l'aide d'une approche GRADE adaptée.

Résultats Principaux

Dix-huit petits essais (soit 1 043 personnes souffrant de cervicalgie) présentant 23 comparaisons ont été inclus. L'analyse était limitée par la qualité variée des essais, les sous-types de traitement hétérogènes et les résultats contradictoires. Les principaux résultats pour la réduction de la cervicalgie par un traitement au moyen de modalités électrothérapeutiques sont les suivants :

Des preuves de très faible qualité que la thérapie par champ électromagnétique pulsé (CEMP), la stimulation magnétique répétitive (SMR) et la neurostimulation électrique transcutanée (NSET) sont plus efficaces qu'un placebo.

Des preuves de faible qualité que les aimants permanents (collier) ne sont pas plus efficaces qu'un placebo.

Des preuves de très faible qualité que le courant galvanique modulé, l'ionophorèse et la stimulation musculaire électrique (SME) ne sont pas plus efficaces qu'un placebo.

Quatre essais seulement avaient rendu compte d'autres critères de jugement tels que le fonctionnement et l'effet global perçu, mais aucun n'avait d'importance clinique.

Conclusions des auteurs

Nous ne pouvons rien exprimer de définitif sur l'efficacité et sur l'utilité clinique des modalités d'électrothérapie pour la cervicalgie. La qualité des preuves étant faible ou très faible, nous ne sommes pas sûrs de l'estimation de l'effet. Les recherches futures modifieront très probablement tant l'estimation de l'effet que la confiance que nous accordons aux résultats. Les données actuelles concernant le CEMP, la SMR et la NSET montrent que ces modalités pourraient bien être plus efficaces qu'un placebo, mais pas les autres interventions. Il convient d'envisager l'existence de biais de financement, en particulier dans les études sur le CEMP. Le courant galvanique, l'ionophorèse, la stimulation musculaire électrique (SME) et le champ magnétique statique n'avaient pas réduit la douleur ni l'invalidité. Les futurs essais sur ces interventions devraient avoir des effectifs de patients plus importants et mettre en œuvre une standardisation et une description plus précises de toutes les caractéristiques de traitement.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

L'électrothérapie pour le traitement de la cervicalgie

L'électrothérapie pour le traitement de la cervicalgie

La cervicalgie est une affection fréquente, invalidante et coûteuse. L'électrothérapie est un terme générique qui couvre un certain nombre de traitements visant à réduire la douleur et à améliorer la tension et la fonction musculaires.

Cette revue mise à jour inclut 18 petits essais (1 043 personnes au total). Il n'a pas été possible de regrouper les résultats des essais, parce qu'ils différaient par les populations, les types et les dosages d'électrothérapie et les traitements de comparaison, et qu'ils mesuraient des critères de résultat légèrement différents.  

Nous ne pouvons rien exprimer de définitif sur l'efficacité de l'électrothérapie pour la cervicalgie en raison de la faible ou très faible qualité des données pour chaque critère de jugement qui, dans la plupart des cas, n'étaient basées que sur les résultats d'un seul essai.

Il est possible que pour les patients souffrant de cervicalgie aiguë, la neurostimulation électrique transcutanée (NSET) ait soulagé la douleur mieux que la stimulation musculaire électrique, moins bien que l'exercice et les infrarouges et aussi bien que la thérapie manuelle et l'échographie. Elle ne procurait aucun avantage supplémentaire lorsqu'on la rajoutait aux infrarouges, aux compresses chaudes avec exercice, à la physiothérapie ou à une combinaison de minerve, d'exercice et de médicaments antalgiques.

Pour les patients souffrant d'une entorse cervicale aiguë, l'iontophorèse n'était pas plus efficace que l'absence de traitement, que le courant interférentiel ou qu'une combinaison de traction, d'exercice et de massage pour le soulagement de la cervicalgie avec maux de tête ; le champ électromagnétique pulsé était plus efficace que les « soins standard ».

Il est possible que pour les patients souffrant de cervicalgie chronique, la NSET ait soulagé la douleur mieux que le placebo et que la stimulation musculaire électrique, pas aussi bien que l'exercice et les infrarouges et aussi bien que la thérapie manuelle et les ultrasons ; le champ électromagnétique pulsé était peut-être meilleur que le placebo, que le courant galvanique et que la stimulation musculaire électrique. Les colliers magnétiques n'étaient pas plus efficaces qu'un placebo pour soulager la douleur ; aucun bénéfice supplémentaire ne découlait de l'ajout de la stimulation musculaire électrique à la mobilisation ou la manipulation.

Pour les patients souffrant de cervicalgie myofasciale, la NSET, la FREMS (une variante de la NSET) et la stimulation magnétique répétitive semblaient mieux soulager la douleur qu'un placebo.

Alors que le risque de biais a été évalué faible pour plus de la moitié des essais, sept d'entre eux ne décrivaient pas la façon dont leurs participants avaient été randomisés, huit n'avaient pas tenu secrète l'affectation du traitement et 12 n'avaient pas contrôlé les co-interventions. Les essais étaient très petits, avec des effectifs entre 16 et 336 participants. Des données éparses et imprécises impliquent que les résultats ne peuvent pas être généralisés à l'ensemble de la population et cela contribue à la réduction de la qualité des données, qui était faible ou très faible pour tous les résultats. Par conséquent, de futures recherches sont très susceptibles de modifier les résultats ainsi que la confiance que nous leur accordons.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 11th September, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français