Get access

Prophylactic platelet transfusion for prevention of bleeding in patients with haematological disorders after chemotherapy and stem cell transplantation

  • Conclusions changed
  • Review
  • Intervention

Authors


Abstract

Background

Platelet transfusions are used in modern clinical practice to prevent and treat bleeding in thrombocytopenic patients with bone marrow failure. Although considerable advances have been made in platelet transfusion therapy in the last 40 years, some areas continue to provoke debate especially concerning the use of prophylactic platelet transfusions for the prevention of thrombocytopenic bleeding.

Objectives

To determine the most effective use of platelet transfusion for the prevention of bleeding in patients with haematological disorders undergoing chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation.

Search methods

This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2004. We searched for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) in the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL Issue 4, 2011), MEDLINE (1950 to Nov 2011), EMBASE (1980 to Nov 2011) and CINAHL (1982 to Nov 2011), using adaptations of the Cochrane RCT search filter, the UKBTS/SRI Transfusion Evidence Library, and ongoing trial databases to 10 November 2011.

Selection criteria

RCTs involving transfusions of platelet concentrates, prepared either from individual units of whole blood or by apheresis, and given to prevent bleeding in patients with haematological disorders. Four different types of prophylactic platelet transfusion trial were included.

Data collection and analysis

In the original review one author initially screened all electronically derived citations and abstracts of papers, identified by the review search strategy, for relevancy. Two authors performed this task in the updated review. Two authors independently assessed the full text of all potentially relevant trials for eligibility. Two authors completed data extraction independently. We requested missing data from the original investigators as appropriate.

Main results

There were 18 trials that were eligible for inclusion, five of these were still ongoing.Thirteen completed published trials (2331 participants) were included for analysis in the review. The original review contained nine trials (718 participants). This updated review includes six new trials (1818 participants).Two trials (205 participants) in the original review are now excluded because fewer than 80% of participants had a haematological disorder.

The four different types of prophylactic platelet transfusion trial, that were the focus of this review, were included within these thirteen trials.

Three trials compared prophylactic platelet transfusions versus therapeutic-only platelet transfusions. There was no statistical difference between the number of participants with clinically significant bleeding in the therapeutic and prophylactic arms but the confidence interval was wide (RR 1.66; 95% CI 0.9 to 3.04).The time taken for a clinically significant bleed to occur was longer in the prophylactic platelet transfusion arm. There was a clear reduction in platelet transfusion usage in the therapeutic arm. There was no statistical difference between the number of participants in the therapeutic and prophylactic arms with platelet refractoriness, the only adverse event reported.

Three trials compared different platelet count thresholds to trigger administration of prophylactic platelet transfusions. No statistical difference was seen in the number of participants with clinically significant bleeding (RR 1.35; 95% CI 0.95 to 1.9), however, this type of bleeding occurred on fewer days in the group of patients transfused at a higher platelet count threshold (RR 1.72; 95% CI 1.33 to 2.22).The lack of a difference seen for the number of participants with clinically significant bleeding may be due to the studies, in combination, having insufficient power to demonstrate a difference, or due to masking of the effect by a higher number of protocol violations in the groups of patients with a lower platelet count threshold. Using a lower platelet count threshold led to a significant reduction in the number of platelet transfusions used. There were no statistical differences in the number of adverse events reported between the two groups.

Six trials compared different doses of prophylactic platelet transfusions. There was no evidence to suggest that using a lower platelet transfusion dose increased: the number of participants with clinically significant (WHO grade 2 or above) (RR 1.02; 95% CI 0.93 to 1.11), or life-threatening (WHO grade 4) bleeding (RR 1.87; 95% CI 0.86 to 4.08). A higher platelet transfusion dose led to a reduction in the number of platelet transfusion episodes, but an increase in total platelet utilisation. Only one adverse event, wheezing after transfusion, had a significantly higher incidence when standard and high dose transfusions were compared but this difference was not seen when low dose and high dose transfusions were compared. It is therefore likely to be a type I error (false positive).

One small trial compared prophylactic platelet transfusions versus platelet-poor plasma. The risk of a significant bleed was decreased in the prophylactic platelet transfusion arm (RR 0.47; 95% CI 0.23 to 0.95) and this was statistically significant.

All studies had threats to validity; the majority of these were due to methodology of the studies not being described in adequate detail.

Although it was not the main focus of the review, it was interesting to note that in one of the pre-specified sub-group analyses (treatment type) two studies showed that patients receiving an autologous transplant have a lower risk of bleeding than patients receiving intensive chemotherapy or an allogeneic transplant (RR 0.73, 95% CI 0.65 to 0.82).

Authors' conclusions

These conclusions refer to the four different types of platelet transfusion trial separately. Firstly, there is no evidence that a prophylactic platelet transfusion policy prevents bleeding. Two large trials comparing a therapeutic versus prophylactic platelet transfusion strategy, that have not yet been published, should provide important new data on this comparison. Secondly, there is no evidence, at the moment, to suggest a change from the current practice of using a platelet count of 10 x 109/L. However, the evidence for a platelet count threshold of 10 x 109/L being equivalent to 20 x 109/L is not as definitive as it would first appear and further research is required. Thirdly, platelet dose does not affect the number of patients with significant bleeding, but whether it affects number of days each patient bleeds for is as yet undetermined. There is no evidence that platelet dose affects the incidence of WHO grade 4 bleeding.Prophylactic platelet transfusions were more effective than platelet-poor plasma at preventing bleeding.

Résumé scientifique

Transfusion prophylactique de plaquettes pour la prévention des saignements chez les patients présentant des troubles hématologiques après une chimiothérapie et une greffe de cellules souches

Contexte

Les transfusions de plaquettes sont utilisées dans la pratique clinique moderne pour prévenir et traiter les saignements chez les patients thrombocytopéniques atteints d'aplasie médullaire. Bien que des progrès considérables aient été accomplis dans le traitement par transfusion de plaquettes au cours des 40 dernières années, certains domaines font encore l'objet de débats, en particulier en ce qui concerne l'utilisation des transfusions de plaquettes prophylactiques pour la prévention des saignements thrombocytopéniques.

Objectifs

Déterminer l'utilisation la plus efficace de la transfusion de plaquettes pour la prévention des saignements chez les patients atteints de troubles hématologiques subissant une chimiothérapie ou une greffe de cellules souches.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Ceci est une mise à jour d’une revue Cochrane publiée pour la première fois en 2004. Nous avons recherché des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL numéro 4, 2011), MEDLINE (de 1950 à novembre 2011), EMBASE (de 1980 à novembre 2011) et CINAHL (de 1982 à novembre 2011), en utilisant des adaptations du filtre de recherche des ECR Cochrane, la UKBTS/SRI Transfusion Evidence Library et des bases de données d'essais en cours jusqu'en novembre 2011.

Critères de sélection

Les ECR portant sur les transfusions de concentrés de plaquettes, préparées soit à partir d'unités individuelles de sang entier ou par aphérèse, et administrées afin de prévenir les saignements chez les patients atteints de troubles hématologiques. Quatre types différents d'essais de transfusion de plaquettes prophylactique ont été inclus.

Recueil et analyse des données

Dans la revue originale, un auteur a analysé initialement la pertinence de toutes les références et de tous les résumés d'articles issus de recherches électroniques, identifiés par la stratégie de recherche de la revue. Deux auteurs ont effectué cette tâche dans la revue mise à jour. Deux auteurs ont évalué de façon indépendante le texte complet de tous les essais potentiellement pertinents en vue d'une inclusion. Deux auteurs ont procédé à l'extraction des données de façon indépendante. Nous avons demandé les données manquantes aux chercheurs d'origine s'il y avait lieu.

Résultats principaux

18 essais pouvaient être inclus, cinq d'entre eux étaient encore en cours. Treize essais publiés terminés (2 331 participants) ont été inclus dans la revue pour être analysés. La revue originale contenaient neuf essais (718 participants). Cette revue mise à jour comprend six nouveaux essais (1 818 participants). Deux essais (205 participants) de la revue originale sont désormais exclus, car moins de 80 % des participants présentaient un trouble hématologique.

Les quatre types différents d'essais de transfusion de plaquettes prophylactique, qui faisaient l'objet de cette revue, étaient inclus dans ces treize essais.

Trois essais comparaient les transfusions de plaquettes prophylactiques versus les transfusions de plaquettes uniquement thérapeutiques. Aucune différence statistique n'a été observée entre le nombre de participants présentant des saignements cliniquement significatifs dans les bras thérapeutiques et prophylactiques, mais l'intervalle de confiance était large (RR 1,66 ; IC à 95 % 0,9 à 3,04). Le temps nécessaire pour que des saignements cliniquement significatifs surviennent a été plus long dans le bras de transfusion de plaquettes prophylactique. Une nette réduction de l'utilisation de transfusions de plaquettes a été constatée dans le bras thérapeutique. Aucune différence statistique n'a été observée dans les bras thérapeutiques et prophylactiques entre le nombre de participants réfractaires aux plaquettes, le seul événement indésirable signalé.

Trois essais comparaient différents seuils de numération plaquettaire pour déclencher l'administration de transfusions de plaquettes prophylactiques. Aucune différence statistique n'a été observée concernant le nombre de participants présentant des saignements cliniquement significatifs (RR 1,35 ; IC à 95 % 0,95 à 1,9), cependant, ce type de saignements est survenu durant moins de jours dans le groupe des patients transfusés à un seuil plus élevé de numération plaquettaire (RR 1,72 ; IC à 95 % 1,33 à 2,22). L'absence de différence observée concernant le nombre de participants présentant des saignements cliniquement significatifs peut être due au fait que les études combinées avaient une puissance insuffisante pour démontrer une différence ou être due à un masquage de l'effet par un plus grand nombre de violations du protocoles dans les groupes de patients avec un seuil de numération plaquettaire inférieur. L'utilisation d'un seuil de numération plaquettaire inférieur a conduit à une réduction significative du nombre de transfusions de plaquettes utilisées. Aucune différence statistique entre les deux groupes n'a été constatée concernant le nombre d'événements indésirables signalés.

Six essais comparaient différentes doses de transfusion de plaquettes prophylactique. Aucune preuve n'a suggéré que l'utilisation d'une dose plus faible de transfusion de plaquettes augmentait : le nombre de participants présentant des saignements cliniquement significatifs (grade OMS 2 ou supérieur) (RR 1,02 ; IC à 95 % 0,93 à 1,11) ou potentiellement mortels (grade OMS 4) (RR 1,87 ; IC à 95 % 0,86 à 4,08). Une dose plus élevée de transfusion de plaquettes a conduit à une réduction du nombre d'épisodes de transfusion de plaquettes, mais à une augmentation de l'utilisation totale de plaquettes. Seul un événement indésirable, une respiration sifflante après la transfusion, avait une incidence significativement supérieure lorsque des transfusions standard ou à forte dose étaient comparées, mais cette différence n'était pas observée lorsque des transfusions à faible dose et à forte dose étaient comparées. Il est donc probable qu'il s'agisse d'une erreur de type I (faux positif).

Un essai de petite taille comparait les transfusions de plaquettes prophylactiques versus transfusions de plasma pauvre en plaquettes. Le risque de saignements significatifs était réduit dans le bras de transfusion de plaquettes prophylactique (RR 0,47 ; IC à 95 % 0,23 à 0,95) et cela était statistiquement significatif.

Toutes les études présentaient des menaces pour la validité ; la majorité d'entre elles étaient dues au fait que la méthodologie des études n'était pas décrite avec des détails adéquats.

Même si cela n'était pas le principal objet de la revue, il a été intéressant de constater que dans l'une des analyses en sous-groupe pré-spécifiées (type de traitement), deux études avaient démontré que les patients recevant une autogreffe avaient un risque moins important de saignements que les patients recevant une chimiothérapie intensive ou une greffe allogénique (RR 0,73, IC à 95 % 0,65 à 0,82).

Conclusions des auteurs

Ces conclusions concernent les quatre types différents d'essai de transfusion de plaquettes distinctement. Tout d'abord, aucune preuve n'indique qu'une politique de transfusion de plaquettes prophylactique prévienne les saignements. Deux essais de grande taille non encore publiés comparant une stratégie de transfusion de plaquettes thérapeutique versus prophylactique devraient fournir de nouvelles données importantes sur cette comparaison. Deuxièmement, il n'existe pour le moment aucune preuve suggérant un changement de la pratique actuelle consistant à utiliser une numération plaquettaire de 10 x 109/L. Toutefois, les preuves indiquant qu'un seuil de numération plaquettaire de 10 x 109/L est équivalent à 20 x 109/L ne sont pas aussi catégoriques qu'il semblerait en premier lieu et des recherches supplémentaires sont nécessaires. Troisièmement, la dose de plaquettes n'affecte pas le nombre de patients présentant des saignements significatifs, mais on ignore encore si elle affecte le nombre de jours durant lesquels chaque patient saigne. Il n'existe aucune preuve indiquant que la dose de plaquettes affecte l'incidence des saignements de grade OMS 4. Les transfusions de plaquettes prophylactiques ont été plus efficaces que le plasma pauvre en plaquettes pour prévenir les saignements.

Resumen

Transfusión profiláctica de plaquetas para la prevención de hemorragias en pacientes con trastornos hematológicos después de quimioterapia y trasplante de células madre

Antecedentes

Las transfusiones de plaquetas se utilizan en la práctica clínica moderna para prevenir y tratar las hemorragias en pacientes con trombocitopenia e insuficiencia de la médula ósea. Aunque en los últimos 40 años se han logrado adelantos considerables en el tratamiento con transfusión de plaquetas todavía algunas áreas provocan debate, especialmente en cuanto al uso de transfusiones profilácticas de plaquetas para la prevención de la hemorragia trombocitopénica.

Objetivos

Determinar el uso más efectivo de la transfusión de plaquetas para prevenir hemorragias en pacientes con trastornos hematológicos a los que se les aplica quimioterapia o trasplante de células madre.

Métodos de búsqueda

Ésta es una actualización de una revisión Cochrane publicada por primera vez en 2004. Se buscaron ensayos controlados aleatorizados (ECA) en el Registro Cochrane Central de Ensayos Controlados (Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) (CENTRAL número 4, 2011), MEDLINE (1950 a noviembre de 2011), EMBASE (1980 a noviembre de 2011) y CINAHL (1982 a noviembre de 2011), mediante adaptaciones del filtro de búsqueda Cochrane de ECA, la UKBTS/SRI Transfusion Evidence Library y bases de datos de ensayos en curso hasta el 10 de noviembre de 2011.

Criterios de selección

ECA que incluyeran transfusiones de concentrados de plaquetas preparados a partir de unidades individuales de sangre completa o por aféresis y administrados para prevenir las hemorragias en pacientes con trastornos hematológicos. Se incluyeron cuatro tipos diferentes de ensayos de transfusión profiláctica de plaquetas.

Obtención y análisis de los datos

En la revisión original un revisor verificó inicialmente todas las citas y resúmenes de los artículos obtenidos de forma electrónica e identificados mediante la estrategia de búsqueda de la revisión, y evaluó su relevancia. Dos revisores realizaron esa labor en la revisión actualizada. Dos revisores evaluaron de forma independiente el texto completo de todos los ensayos potencialmente relevantes para su elegibilidad. Dos revisores completaron la extracción de datos de forma independiente. Los datos faltantes se les solicitaron a los investigadores originales cuando fue apropiado.

Resultados principales

Fueron elegibles para inclusión 18 ensayos y cinco de ellos estaban todavía en curso. Para el análisis en la revisión se incluyeron 13 ensayos completos publicados (2331 participantes). La revisión original incluyó nueve ensayos (718 participantes). Esta revisión actualizada incluye seis nuevos ensayos (1818 participantes). Dos ensayos (205 participantes) de la revisión original ahora se excluyeron debido a que menos del 80% de los participantes presentaban un trastorno hematológico.

Estos 13 ensayos incluyeron los cuatro tipos diferentes de ensayos de transfusión profiláctica de plaquetas, que eran el objetivo de esta revisión.

Tres ensayos compararon transfusiones profilácticas de plaquetas versus transfusiones de plaquetas exclusivamente terapéuticas. No hubo diferencias estadísticas entre el número de participantes con hemorragia clínicamente significativa en los brazos terapéuticos y profilácticos, aunque el intervalo de confianza fue amplio (CR 1,66; IC del 95%: 0,9 a 3,04). El tiempo transcurrido hasta la aparición de una hemorragia clínicamente significativa fue más largo en el brazo de transfusión profiláctica de plaquetas. En el brazo terapéutico hubo una reducción clara en el uso de transfusiones de plaquetas. No hubo diferencias estadísticas entre el número de participantes en los brazos terapéuticos y profilácticos con plaquetas refractarias, el único evento adverso informado.

Tres ensayos compararon diferentes umbrales de recuento de plaquetas que motivaron la administración de transfusiones profilácticas de plaquetas. No se observaron diferencias estadísticas en el número de participantes con hemorragia clínicamente significativa (CR 1,35; IC del 95%: 0,95 a 1,9); sin embargo, este tipo de hemorragia ocurrió en menos días en el grupo de pacientes transfundidos con un umbral mayor de recuento de plaquetas (CR 1,72; IC del 95%: 1,33 a 2,22). La falta de una diferencia observada en los participantes con hemorragia clínicamente significativa puede deberse a que los estudios en conjunto no tuvieron poder estadístico suficiente para demostrar una diferencia, o debido a que el efecto fue encubierto por un número mayor de violaciones del protocolo en los grupos de pacientes con un umbral inferior de recuento de plaquetas. El uso de un umbral inferior de recuento de plaquetas redujo significativamente el número de transfusiones de plaquetas utilizadas. No hubo diferencias estadísticas en el número de eventos adversos informados entre los dos grupos.

Seis ensayos compararon dosis diferentes de transfusiones profilácticas de plaquetas. No hubo pruebas que indicaran que el uso de una dosis menor de transfusiones de plaquetas aumentara los siguientes parámetros: el número de participantes con hemorragia clínicamente significativa (grado 2 o mayor de la OMS) (CR 1,02; IC del 95%: 0,93 a 1,11) o potencialmente mortal (grado 4 de la OMS) (CR 1,87; IC del 95%: 0,86 a 4,08). Una dosis mayor de transfusión de plaquetas dio lugar a una reducción en el número de episodios de transfusión de plaquetas, aunque aumentó la utilización total de plaquetas. Sólo un evento adverso, las sibilancias después de la transfusión, tuvo una incidencia significativamente mayor al comparar las transfusiones de dosis estándar y altas, aunque esta diferencia no se observó al comparar las transfusiones a dosis baja y a dosis alta. Por lo tanto, es probable que haya sido un error tipo I (falso positivo).

Un ensayo pequeño comparó transfusiones profilácticas de plaquetas versus plasma pobre en plaquetas. El riesgo de hemorragia significativa disminuyó en el brazo de transfusión profiláctica de plaquetas (CR 0,47; IC del 95%: 0,23 a 0,95) y dicha disminución fue estadísticamente significativa.

Todos los estudios presentaron amenazas a la validez; en su mayoría se debió a la falta de detalles adecuados en la descripción de los métodos de los estudios.

Aunque no era el objetivo principal de la revisión, fue interesante observar que en uno de los análisis de subgrupos predefinido (tipo de tratamiento) dos estudios mostraron que los pacientes que recibieron trasplante autólogo presentaron un riesgo menor de hemorragia que los pacientes a los que se les aplicó quimioterapia intensiva o un alotrasplante (CR 0,73; IC del 95%: 0,65 a 0,82).

Conclusiones de los autores

Estas conclusiones se refieren a los cuatro tipos diferentes de ensayos de transfusión de plaquetas por separado. En primer lugar, no existen pruebas de que una política de transfusión profiláctica de plaquetas prevenga las hemorragias. Dos ensayos grandes todavía no publicados que compararon una estrategia de transfusión de plaquetas terapéutica versus profiláctica aportarán datos importantes sobre esta comparación. En segundo lugar, actualmente no hay pruebas que indiquen una modificación de la práctica actual del uso de un recuento de plaquetas de 10 x 109/l. Sin embargo, las pruebas de que un umbral de recuento de plaquetas de 10 x 109/l sea equivalente al de 20 x 109/l no son tan definitivas como podrían parecer inicialmente y se necesitan estudios de investigación adicionales. En tercer lugar, la dosis de plaquetas no afecta el número de pacientes con hemorragia significativa, aunque hasta ahora no se determinó si afecta el número de días con hemorragia en cada paciente. No existen pruebas de que la dosis de plaquetas afecte la incidencia de hemorragias de grado 4 de la OMS. Las transfusiones profilácticas de plaquetas fueron más efectivas que el plasma pobre en plaquetas para prevenir las hemorragias.

Plain language summary

Platelet transfusions are used to prevent bleeding in patients with low platelet counts due to treatment-induced bone marrow failure

This review was undertaken to determine the best use of platelet transfusions for the prevention of bleeding in patients who have haematological disorders and are receiving intensive (myelosuppressive) chemotherapy or stem cell transplantation. The review aimed to look at three main topics. One, what is the evidence to indicate if platelet transfusions should be given to prevent bleeding as compared to a strategy aimed at transfusion when bleeding occurs? Second, if platelet transfusions are given to prevent bleeding, when should they be given, for example, at what level of platelet count when measured in a blood sample? Three, if platelet transfusions are given what platelet dose should be used? We are unable to answer the first question, however new data from two large studies should be available when this review is updated in approximately two years time. With regard to the second question, there is no evidence to suggest a change from the current practice of using a platelet count of 10 x 109/L to trigger the use of platelet transfusions to prevent bleeding. However, more research is required to clarify this issue. The final question can be answered. Using a lower platelet dose did not lead to an increased risk of bleeding and fewer platelets were required. The reduction in the number of platelets used should, theoretically, reduce the risk of adverse events although no true differences were seen in the studies. However, adverse events are uncommon and therefore a statistically significant difference may not be seen.

Résumé simplifié

Les transfusions de plaquettes sont utilisées pour prévenir les saignements chez les patients ayant un faible nombre de plaquettes en raison d'une aplasie médullaire due à un traitement

Cette revue a été réalisée afin de déterminer la meilleure utilisation des transfusions de plaquettes pour la prévention des saignements chez les patients présentant des troubles hématologiques et recevant une chimiothérapie (myélosuppressive) intensive ou une greffe de cellules souches. La revue avait pour objectif d'examiner trois sujets principaux. Le premier : quelles sont les preuves indiquant si des transfusions de plaquettes doivent être administrées pour prévenir les saignements, comparé à une stratégie de transfusion lorsque les saignements apparaissent ? Le deuxième : si des transfusions de plaquettes sont administrées pour prévenir les saignements, quand doivent-elles être administrées, par exemple à quel niveau de numération plaquettaire mesurée dans un échantillon de sang ? Le troisième : si des transfusions de plaquettes sont administrées, quelle dose de plaquettes doit être utilisée ? Nous sommes incapables de répondre à la première question, cependant, de nouvelles données issues de deux grandes études devraient être disponibles lorsque cette revue sera mise à jour, dans environ deux ans. Concernant la deuxième question, aucune preuve ne suggère de changer la pratique actuelle consistant à utiliser une numération plaquettaire de 10 x 109/L pour déclencher l'utilisation de transfusions de plaquettes afin de prévenir les saignements. Cependant, des recherches supplémentaires sont nécessaires pour clarifier cette question. Quant à la dernière question, il est possible d'y répondre. L'utilisation d'une dose inférieure de plaquettes n'a pas conduit à un risque accru de saignements et un moins grand nombre de plaquettes ont été nécessaires. La réduction du nombre de plaquettes utilisées devrait, théoriquement, réduire le risque d'événements indésirables même si aucune différence réelle n'a été observée dans les études. Cependant, les événements indésirables sont rares et, par conséquent, il est possible qu'une différence statistiquement significative passe inaperçue.

Notes de traduction

Translated by: French Cochrane Centre

Translation supported by: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français

Resumen en términos sencillos

Las transfusiones de plaquetas se utilizan para prevenir las hemorragias en pacientes con bajos recuentos de plaquetas debido a la insuficiencia de la médula ósea inducida por el tratamiento

Esta revisión se realizó para determinar el uso óptimo de las transfusiones de plaquetas para prevenir las hemorragias en pacientes con trastornos hematológicos que reciben quimioterapia intensiva (mielosupresora) o trasplante de células madre. La revisión tuvo como objetivo analizar tres temas principales. Uno, ¿qué pruebas hay para decidir si se deben administrar transfusiones de plaquetas para prevenir la hemorragia en lugar de una estrategia dirigida a la transfusión cuando ocurre la hemorragia? Segundo, si se administran transfusiones de plaquetas para prevenir las hemorragias ¿cuándo se deben administrar?, por ejemplo, ¿con qué nivel de recuento de plaquetas (medido a partir de una muestra de sangre)? Tres, si se administran transfusiones de plaquetas ¿qué dosis de plaquetas se debe utilizar? No fue posible responder la primera pregunta; sin embargo, cuando se actualice esta revisión en aproximadamente dos años, habrá nuevos datos disponibles de dos estudios grandes. Con respecto a la segunda pregunta, no hay pruebas para indicar un cambio en la práctica actual de tomar un recuento de plaquetas de 10 x 109/l como el valor para realizar las transfusiones de plaquetas para prevenir la hemorragia. Sin embargo, se requiere más investigación para aclarar esta cuestión. La última pregunta puede ser respondida. El uso de una dosis de plaquetas menor no aumentó el riesgo de hemorragia y se necesitaron menos plaquetas. La reducción en el número de plaquetas utilizadas teóricamente debería reducir el riesgo de eventos adversos, aunque no se observaron diferencias ciertas en los estudios. Sin embargo, los efectos adversos son poco frecuentes, por lo que no fue posible observar una diferencia estadísticamente significativa.

Notas de traducción

La traducción y edición de las revisiones Cochrane han sido realizadas bajo la responsabilidad del Centro Cochrane Iberoamericano, gracias a la suscripción efectuada por el Ministerio de Sanidad, Servicios Sociales e Igualdad del Gobierno español. Si detecta algún problema con la traducción, por favor, contacte con Infoglobal Suport, cochrane@infoglobal-suport.com.

Ancillary