Intervention Review

Music therapy for people with autism spectrum disorder

  1. Monika Geretsegger1,2,
  2. Cochavit Elefant3,
  3. Karin A Mössler4,
  4. Christian Gold4,*

Editorial Group: Cochrane Developmental, Psychosocial and Learning Problems Group

Published Online: 17 JUN 2014

Assessed as up-to-date: 2 DEC 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004381.pub3


How to Cite

Geretsegger M, Elefant C, Mössler KA, Gold C. Music therapy for people with autism spectrum disorder. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2014, Issue 6. Art. No.: CD004381. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004381.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Faculty of Humanities, Aalborg University, Department of Communication and Psychology, Aalborg, Denmark

  2. 2

    Faculty of Psychology, University of Vienna, Department of Applied Psychology: Health, Development, Enhancement and Intervention, Vienna, Austria

  3. 3

    University of Haifa, Haifa, Israel

  4. 4

    Uni Health, Uni Research, GAMUT - The Grieg Academy Music Therapy Research Centre, Bergen, Hordaland, Norway

*Christian Gold, GAMUT - The Grieg Academy Music Therapy Research Centre, Uni Health, Uni Research, Lars Hilles Gate 3, Bergen, Hordaland, 5015, Norway. christian.gold@uni.no.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (conclusions changed)
  2. Published Online: 17 JUN 2014

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

The central impairments of people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affect social interaction and communication. Music therapy uses musical experiences and the relationships that develop through them to enable communication and expression, thus attempting to address some of the core problems of people with ASD. The present version of this review on music therapy for ASD is an update of the original Cochrane review published in 2006.

Objectives

To assess the effects of music therapy for individuals with ASD.

Search methods

We searched the following databases in July 2013: CENTRAL, Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, PsycINFO, CINAHL, ERIC, ASSIA, Sociological Abstracts, and Dissertation Abstracts International. We also checked the reference lists of relevant studies and contacted investigators in person.

Selection criteria

All randomised controlled trials (RCTs) or controlled clinical trials comparing music therapy or music therapy added to standard care to 'placebo' therapy, no treatment, or standard care for individuals with ASD were considered for inclusion.

Data collection and analysis

Two authors independently selected studies, assessed risk of bias, and extracted data from all included studies. We calculated the pooled standardised mean difference (SMD) and corresponding 95% confidence interval (CI) for continuous outcomes to allow the combination data from different scales and to facilitate the interpretation of effect sizes. Heterogeneity was assessed using the I² statistic. In cases of statistical heterogeneity within outcome subgroups, we examined clients' age, intensity of therapy (number and frequency of therapy sessions), and treatment approach as possible sources of heterogeneity.

Main results

We included 10 studies (165 participants) that examined the short- and medium-term effect of music therapy interventions (one week to seven months) for children with ASD. Music was superior to 'placebo' therapy or standard care with respect to the primary outcomes social interaction within the therapy context (SMD 1.06, 95% CI 0.02 to 2.10, 1 RCT, n = 10); generalised social interaction outside of the therapy context (SMD 0.71, 95% CI 0.18 to 1.25, 3 RCTs, n = 57, moderate quality evidence), non-verbal communicative skills within the therapy context (SMD 0.57, 95% CI 0.29 to 0.85, 3 RCTs, n = 30), verbal communicative skills (SMD 0.33, 95% CI 0.16 to 0.49, 6 RCTs, n = 139), initiating behaviour (SMD 0.73, 95% CI 0.36 to 1.11, 3 RCTs, n = 22, moderate quality evidence), and social-emotional reciprocity (SMD 2.28, 95% CI 0.73 to 3.83, 1 RCT, n = 10, low quality evidence). There was no statistically significant difference in non-verbal communicative skills outside of the therapy context (SMD 0.48, 95% CI -0.02 to 0.98, 3 RCTs, n = 57, low quality evidence). Music therapy was also superior to 'placebo' therapy or standard care in secondary outcome areas, including social adaptation (SMD 0.41, 95% CI 0.21 to 0.60, 4 RCTs, n = 26), joy (SMD 0.96, 95% CI 0.04 to 1.88, 1 RCT, n = 10), and quality of parent-child relationships (SMD 0.82, 95% CI 0.13 to 1.52, 2 RCTs, n = 33, moderate quality evidence). None of the included studies reported any adverse effects. The small sample sizes of the studies limit the methodological strength of these findings.

Authors' conclusions

The findings of this updated review provide evidence that music therapy may help children with ASD to improve their skills in primary outcome areas that constitute the core of the condition including social interaction, verbal communication, initiating behaviour, and social-emotional reciprocity. Music therapy may also help to enhance non-verbal communication skills within the therapy context. Furthermore, in secondary outcome areas, music therapy may contribute to increasing social adaptation skills in children with ASD and to promoting the quality of parent-child relationships. In contrast to the studies included in an earlier version of this review published in 2006, the new studies included in this update enhanced the applicability of findings to clinical practice. More research using larger samples and generalised outcome measures is needed to corroborate these findings and to examine whether the effects of music therapy are enduring. When applying the results of this review to practice, it is important to note that the application of music therapy requires specialised academic and clinical training.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Music therapy for people with autism spectrum disorder

Review Question

We reviewed the evidence about the effect of music therapy in people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). We compared music therapy or music therapy in addition to standard care to no therapy, similar treatment without music ('placebo' therapy), or standard care.

Background

People with ASD have difficulties with social interaction and communication. Music therapy uses musical experiences and the relationships that develop through them to enable people to relate to others, to communicate, and to share their feelings. In this way, music therapy addresses some of the core problems of people with ASD. We wanted to discover whether music therapy helps people with ASD compared to other alternatives.

Study Characteristics

We included 10 studies with a total number of 165 participants. The studies examined the short- and medium-term effect of music therapy interventions (one week to seven months) for children with ASD.

Key Results

Music therapy was superior to 'placebo' therapy or standard care with respect to social interaction, non-verbal and verbal communicative skills, initiating behaviour, and social-emotional reciprocity. Music therapy was also superior to 'placebo' therapy or standard care in the areas of social adaptation, joy, and the quality of parent-child relationships. None of the included studies reported any side effects caused by music therapy.

Quality of the Evidence

The quality of the evidence was moderate for social interaction outside of the therapy context, initiating behaviour, social adaptation, and the quality of the parent-child relationship, and low for the other three main outcomes (nonverbal communicative skills outside of the therapy context, verbal communicative skills outside of the therapy context, and social-emotional reciprocity). Reasons for limited quality of the evidence were issues with study design and small number of patients who participated in the studies.

Authors' Conclusions

Music therapy may help children with ASD to improve their skills in important areas such as social interaction and communication. Music therapy may also contribute to increasing social adaptation skills in children with ASD and to promoting the quality of parent-child relationships. Some of the included studies featured interventions that correspond well with treatment in clinical practice. More research with adequate design and using larger numbers of patients is needed. It is important to specifically examine how long the effects of music therapy last. The application of music therapy requires specialised academic and clinical training. This is important when applying the results of this review to practice.

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

La musicothérapie chez les patients atteints de troubles du spectre autistique

Contexte

Les principales déficiences des sujets atteints de troubles du spectre autistique (TSA) affectent l'interaction sociale et la communication. La musicothérapie s’appuie sur des expériences musicales et les relations qu’elles engendrent pour favoriser la communication et l'expression afin d'aborder certains des problèmes majeurs rencontrés par les patients atteints de TSA. La présente version de cette revue sur la musicothérapie pour les patients atteints de TSA est une mise à jour de la revue Cochrane originale publiée en 2006.

Objectifs

Evaluer les effets de la musicothérapie chez les patients atteints de TSA.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans les bases de données suivantes en juillet 2013 : CENTRAL, Ovid MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, PsycINFO, CINAHL, ERIC, ASSIA, Sociological Abstracts et Dissertation Abstracts International. Nous avons également vérifié les références bibliographiques des études pertinentes et contacté les investigateurs en personne.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons pris en compte pour inclusion tous les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) ou essais cliniques contrôlés comparant la musicothérapie ou de la musicothérapie utilisée en complément de soins standard à une thérapie placebo, l'absence de traitement ou des soins standard chez des patients atteints de TSA.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs ont, de manière indépendante, sélectionné les études, évalué le risque de biais et extrait les données de toutes les études incluses. Nous avons calculé la différence moyenne standardisée (DMS) combinée et les intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95 % correspondantes pour les résultats continus afin de permettre la combinaison des données issues d'échelles différentes et de faciliter l'interprétation de l’ampleur de l’effet.  L'hétérogénéité a été évaluée en utilisant la statistique I². Dans les cas d'hétérogénéité statistique dans les résultats en sous-groupes, nous avons examiné l’âge des patients, l'intensité du traitement (nombre et fréquence des séances de thérapie), et l’approche de traitement comme des sources éventuelles d'hétérogénéité.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus 10 études (165 participants) qui examinaient les effets à court et moyen terme d'interventions en musicothérapie (une semaine à sept mois) pour les enfants atteints de TSA. La musique a produit des résultats supérieurs au traitement placebo ou à des soins standard à l’égard des principaux critères de jugement de l'interaction sociale dans le contexte thérapeutique (DMS 1,06, IC à 95 % 0,02 à 2,10, 1 ECR, n = 10), l’interaction sociale généralisée hors du contexte thérapeutique (DMS 0,71, IC à 95 % 0,18 à 1,25, 3 ECR, n = 57, preuves de qualité modérée), les capacités de communication non verbale dans le contexte thérapeutique (DMS 0,57, IC à 95 % 0,29 à 0,85, 3 ECR, n = 30), les capacités de communication verbale (DMS 0,33, IC à 95 % 0,16 à 0,49, 6 ECR, n = 139), l'initiation d'un comportement (DMS de 0,73, IC à 95 % 0,36 à 1,11, 3 ECR, n = 22, preuves de qualité modérée) et la réciprocité socio-émotionnelle (DMS 2,28, IC à 95 % 0,73 à 3,83, 1 ECR, n = 10, preuves de faible qualité). Il n'y avait aucune différence statistiquement significative en termes de capacités de communication non verbale hors du contexte thérapeutique (DMS 0,48, IC à 95 % -0,02 à 0,98, 3 ECR, n = 57, preuves de faible qualité). La musicothérapie a également fourni des résultats supérieurs à une thérapie placebo ou à des soins standard dans des domaines de critères de jugement secondaires, y compris l’adaptation sociale (DMS 0,41, IC à 95 % 0,21 à 0,60, 4 ECR, n = 26), la joie (DMS 0,96, IC à 95 % 0,04 à 1,88, 1 ECR, n = 10) et la qualité des relations parents-enfants (DMS 0,82, IC à 95 % 0,13 à 1,52, 2 ECR, n = 33, preuves de qualité modérée). Aucune des études incluses ne rapportait d'effets indésirables. La petite taille des échantillons de ces études limite la force méthodologique de ces résultats.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les résultats de cette revue mise à jour apportent les preuves que la musicothérapie pourrait aider les enfants atteints de TSA à améliorer leurs compétences dans les domaines des critères de jugement principaux qui constituent le noyau de la maladie, parmi lesquels l'interaction sociale, la communication verbale et la réciprocité socio-émotionnelle. La musicothérapie pourrait également aider à améliorer les compétences de communication non verbale dans le contexte thérapeutique. De surcroît, dans les domaines des critères de jugement secondaires, la musicothérapie pourrait contribuer à augmenter les compétences d’adaptation sociale chez les enfants atteints de TSA et à promouvoir la qualité des relations parents-enfants. Contrairement aux études incluses dans une version précédente de cette revue publiée en 2006, les nouvelles études comprises dans cette mise à jour ont amélioré l’applicabilité des résultats à la pratique clinique. Des recherches supplémentaires portant sur de plus grands effectifs et des critères d’évaluation généralisés sont nécessaires pour corroborer ces résultats et pour examiner la durabilité des effets de la musicothérapie. Pour l'application pratique des résultats de cette revue, il est important de tenir compte du fait que la musicothérapie exige une formation universitaire et clinique spécialisée.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

La musicothérapie chez les patients atteints de troubles du spectre autistique

La musicothérapie chez les patients atteints de troubles du spectre autistique

Question

Nous avons examiné les preuves concernant l'effet de la musicothérapie chez les personnes atteintes de troubles du spectre autistique (TSA). Nous avons comparé la musicothérapie ou de la musicothérapie en plus des soins standard à l'absence de traitement, un traitement similaire sans la musique (traitement « placebo »), ou des soins standard.

Contexte

Les patients atteints de TSA présentent des difficultés d'interaction sociale et de communication. La musicothérapie utilise des expériences musicales et les relations développées grâce à elles pour permettre aux personnes de se lier à d'autres, de communiquer et de partager leurs sentiments. La musicothérapie permet donc d'aborder certains des principaux problèmes rencontrés par les patients atteints de TSA. Nous avons voulu déterminer si la musicothérapie aide les personnes atteintes de TSA en comparaison à d'autres alternatives.

Les caractéristiques de l'étude

Nous avons inclus 10 études avec un nombre total de 165 participants. Les études ont porté sur les effets à court et moyen terme d'interventions en musicothérapie (une semaine à sept mois) pour les enfants atteints de TSA.

Principaux résultats

La musicothérapie a fourni des résultats supérieurs à la thérapie placebo ou à des soins standard en ce qui concerne l'interaction sociale et les capacités de communication non verbale et verbale, l'initiation d'un comportement et la réciprocité socio-émotionnelle. La musicothérapie a également fourni des résultats supérieurs à une thérapie « placebo » ou à des soins standard dans les domaines de l'adaptation sociale, de la joie, et de la qualité des relations parents-enfants. Aucune des études incluses ne rapportait d'effets secondaires causés par la musicothérapie.

Qualité des preuves

La qualité des preuves était modérée pour l'interaction sociale en dehors du contexte de la thérapie, l'initiation d'un comportement, l’adaptation sociale et la qualité de la relation parents-enfants, et faible pour les trois autres critères de jugement principaux (les capacités de communication non verbale en dehors du contexte thérapeutique, les capacités de communication verbale en dehors du contexte thérapeutique et la réciprocité socio-émotionnelle). Les raisons de la qualité limitée des preuves étaient des problèmes liés à la conception de l’étude et au petit nombre de patients recrutés pour ces études.

Conclusions des auteurs

La musicothérapie pourrait aider les enfants atteints de TSA à améliorer leurs compétences dans des domaines importants tels que l'interaction sociale et la communication. La musicothérapie pourrait également contribuer à augmenter les compétences d’adaptation sociale chez les enfants atteints de TSA et à promouvoir la qualité des relations parents-enfants. Certaines des études incluses comprenaient des interventions qui correspondent bien à un traitement dans la pratique clinique. Il faudra effectuer des recherches supplémentaires mieux conçues et portant sur un plus grand nombre de patients. Il est important d’examiner spécifiquement la durée des effets procurés par la musicothérapie. L'application de la musicothérapie exige une formation universitaire et clinique spécialisée. Ceci est important lorsque les résultats de cette revue sont appliqués dans la pratique.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 6th August, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé