Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Primaquine for preventing relapse in people with Plasmodium vivax malaria treated with chloroquine

  1. Gawrie NL Galappaththy1,*,
  2. Prathap Tharyan2,
  3. Richard Kirubakaran2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group

Published Online: 26 OCT 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 8 OCT 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004389.pub3


How to Cite

Galappaththy GNL, Tharyan P, Kirubakaran R. Primaquine for preventing relapse in people with Plasmodium vivax malaria treated with chloroquine. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 10. Art. No.: CD004389. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004389.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Ministry of Health, National Malaria Control Programme, Dehiwala, Colombo, Sri Lanka

  2. 2

    Christian Medical College, South Asian Cochrane Network & Centre, Prof. BV Moses & ICMR Advanced Centre for Research & Training in Evidence Informed Health Care, Vellore, Tamil Nadu, India

*Gawrie NL Galappaththy, National Malaria Control Programme, Ministry of Health, 45/2C Auburn Side, Dehiwala, Colombo, Sri Lanka. hapugalleg@gmail.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (conclusions changed)
  2. Published Online: 26 OCT 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Plasmodium vivax infections are an important contributor to the malaria burden worldwide. The World Health Organization recommends a 14-day course of primaquine (0.25 mg/kg/day, giving an adult dose of 15 mg/day) to eradicate the liver stage of the parasite and prevent relapse of the disease. Many people find a 14-day primaquine regimen difficult to complete, and there is a potential risk of haemolytic anaemia in people with glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase enzyme (G6PD) deficiency. This review evaluates primaquine in P. vivax, particularly alternatives to the standard 14-day course.

Objectives

To compare alternative primaquine regimens to the recommended 14-day regimen for preventing relapses (radical cure) in people with P. vivax malaria treated for blood stage infection with chloroquine. We also summarize trials comparing primaquine to no primaquine that led to the recommendation for the 14-day regimen.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Infectious Diseases Group's Specialized Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE and LILACS up to 8 October 2013. We checked conference proceedings, trial registries and reference lists and contacted researchers and pharmaceutical companies for eligible studies.

Selection criteria

Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-RCTs comparing various primaquine dosing regimens with the standard primaquine regimen (15 mg/day for 14 days), or with no primaquine, in people with vivax malaria treated for blood stage infection with chloroquine.

Data collection and analysis

We independently assessed trial eligibility, trial quality, and extracted data. We calculated risk ratios (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) for dichotomous data, and used the random-effects model in meta-analyses if there was significant heterogeneity. We assessed the overall quality of the evidence using the GRADE approach.

Main results

We included 15 trials (two cluster-RCTs) of 4377 adult and child participants. Most trials excluded people with G6PD deficiency. Trials compared various regimens of primaquine with the standard primaquine regimen, or with placebo or no treatment. All trials treated blood stage infection with chloroquine.

Alternative primaquine regimens compared to 14-day primaquine

Relapse rates were higher over six months with the five-day primaquine regimen than the standard 14-day regimen (RR 10.05, 95% CI 2.82 to 35.86; two trials, 186 participants, moderate quality evidence). Similarly, relapse over six months was higher with three days of primaquine than the standard 14-day regimen (RR 3.18, 95% CI 2.1 to 4.81; two trials, 262 participants, moderate quality evidence; six months follow-up); and with primaquine for seven days followed up over two months, compared to 14-day primaquine (RR 2.24, 95% CI 1.24 to 4.03; one trial, 126 participants, low quality evidence).

Relapse with once-weekly supervised primaquine for eight weeks was little different over nine months follow-up compared to 14-day self-administered primaquine in one small study (RR 2.97, 95% CI 0.34 to 25.87; one trial, 129 participants, very low quality evidence).

Primaquine regimens compared to no primaquine

The number of people that relapsed was similar between people given five days of primaquine or given placebo or no primaquine (four trials, 2213 participants, high quality evidence; follow-up six to 15 months); but lower with 14 days of primaquine (RR 0.6; 95% CI 0.48 to 0.75; ten trials, 1740 participants, high quality evidence; follow-up seven weeks to 15 months).

No serious adverse events were reported. Treatment-limiting adverse events were rare and non-serious adverse events were mild and transient. Trial authors reported that people tolerated the drugs.

We did not find trials comparing higher dose primaquine regimens (0.5 mg/kg/day or more) for five days or more with the 14-day regimen.

Authors' conclusions

The analysis confirms the current World Health Organization recommendation for 14-day primaquine (15 mg/day) to prevent relapse of vivax malaria. Shorter primaquine regimens at the same daily dose are associated with higher relapse rates. The comparative effects with weekly primaquine are promising, but require further trials to establish equivalence or non-inferiority compared to the 14-day regimen in high malaria transmission settings.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

Primaquine for preventing relapses in people with Plasmodium vivax malaria

Malaria due to Plasmodium vivax parasites is widespread. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends that people with P. vivax malaria are treated with chloroquine for three days to eliminate the parasites in the blood that cause the symptoms of malaria, followed by 15 mg/day of primaquine for 14 days to treat the liver stage of the infection to prevent the disease recurring. However, many people do not complete the primaquine treatment once they feel better after chloroquine treatment. In addition, primaquine can destroy red blood cells in people with a genetic enzyme deficiency (glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase enzyme (G6PD) deficiency), and clinicians avoid giving primaquine in areas where people commonly have this deficiency. Shorter courses of primaquine could potentially increase treatment completion and reduce adverse events.

The review authors included 15 trials of 4377 adults and children older than one year with vivax malaria. All were treated with chloroquine for the blood stage infection, and then randomized to the 14-day primaquine course, or to shorter primaquine courses (three, five, or seven days); or to higher doses of primaquine given once a week for eight weeks; or to a placebo or no treatment. In twelve studies, treatments were supervised. The evidence is current to 8 October 2013.

Relapse over six months to one year is probably higher with shorter regimens when compared to the standard 14-day primaquine regimen (moderate quality evidence). We do not know from the available evidence whether the number of relapses with weekly primaquine differs from 14 days of primaquine treatment based on one study of 126 people followed up for nine months (very low quality evidence). Better conducted studies on more people are needed to be sure that they are equally effective against relapse. Five days of primaquine was as ineffective against relapse as placebo or no treatment over six months to 15 months based on four studies (high quality evidence). The 14-day primaquine course prevented many more people relapsing with vivax malaria over 12 months than placebo (high quality evidence). No serious adverse reactions to primaquine were reported.

This review update confirms that the 14-day primaquine course recommended by the WHO is more effective against relapse of vivax malaria than treatment with shorter courses of primaquine.

 

Résumé scientifique

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

La primaquine pour la prévention de rechutes chez les patients atteints de paludisme à Plasmodium vivax traités à la chloroquine

Contexte

Plasmodium vivax Les infections sont un facteur important du paludisme dans le monde. L'Organisation mondiale de la Santé recommande un traitement de 14 jours à la primaquine (0,25 mg/kg/jour, dose de 15 mg/jour pour un adulte) pour éradiquer la phase hépatique du parasite et prévenir la rechute de la maladie. De nombreuses personnes trouvent qu’un traitement de 14 jours à la primaquine est difficile à terminer, il existe également un risque potentiel de l'anémie hémolytique chez les patients atteints de glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase enzyme (déficitenG6PD). Cette revue évalue la primaquine dans P. Vivax , en particulier les alternatives au traitement standard de 14 jours.

Objectifs

Comparer des traitements alternatifs à la primaquine au traitement recommandé de 14 jours à la primaquine pour la prévention des rechutes (une guérison radicale) chez les patients atteints de paludisme P. Vivax et traités à la chloroquine pendant la période d'infection sanguine. Nous avons également résumé les essais comparant la primaquine à l'absence de primaquine et qui ont conduit à recommander le traitement de 14 jours.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les maladies infectieuses, CENTRAL ( La Bibliothèque Cochrane ), MEDLINE, EMBASE et LILACS jusqu' au 8 octobre 2013. Nous avons vérifié les actes de conférence, les registres d'essais et les références bibliographiques et contacté des chercheurs et des sociétés pharmaceutiques pour les études éligibles.

Critères de sélection

Essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) et quasi-ECR comparant des traitements à la primaquine en doses variées avec le traitement standard de primaquine (15 mg/jour pendant 14 jours), ou à l'absence de primaquine, chez les patients atteints de paludisme à P. vivax traités pendant la phase de l'infection par la chloroquine.

Recueil et analyse des données

Nous avons évalué de manière indépendante l'éligibilité, la qualité des essais et extrait les données. Nous avons calculé les risques relatifs (RR) avec des intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95% pour les données dichotomiques et avons utilisé le modèle à effets aléatoires dans les méta-analyses s'il existait une hétérogénéité significative. Nous avons évalué la qualité globale des preuves en utilisant l'approche GRADE.

Résultats principaux

Nous avons inclus 15 essais (deux ECR en cluster) de 4 377 adultes et enfants. La plupart des essais excluaient les personnes atteintes de déficience en G6PD. Les essais comparaient différents traitements à la primaquine avec le traitement standard à la primaquine, ou à un placebo ou à l'absence de traitement. Tous les essais traitaient la période d'infection sanguine à la chloroquine.

> Traitements alternatifs à la primaquine par rapport au traitement de 14 jours à la primaquine

Les taux de rechute étaient supérieurs au bout de six mois avec le traitement de 5 jours à la primaquine comparé au traitement standard de 14 jours à la primaquine (RR 10,05, IC à 95%, de 2,82 à 35,86; deux essais, 186 participants, preuves de qualité modérée). De même, les rechutes pendant les six mois suivants étaient supérieures avec le traitement de 3 jours à la primaquine comparé au traitement standard de 14 jours à la primaquine (RR de 3,18, IC à 95% de 2,1 à 4,81; deux essais, 262 participants, preuves de qualité modérée ; six mois de suivi ) ; et au traitement de 7 jours à la primaquine pendant une durée de deux mois comparé aux 14 jours à la primaquine (RR 2,24, IC à 95% de 1,24 à 4,03; un essai, 126 participants, preuves de faible qualité ). Une étude de petite taille a révélé que, sur un suivi de 9 mois, le nombre de rechute était peu différent avec un traitement à la primaquine une fois par semaine pendant huit semaines comparé au traitement standard de 14 jours à la primaquine (RR 2,97, IC à 95% de 0,34 à 25,87; un essai, 129 participants, preuves de qualité très médiocre ) .

Les traitements à la primaquine comparés à l'absence de primaquine

Le nombre de patients qui avaient rechuté était similaire entre les patients recevant un traitement de 5 jours à la primaquine ou ayant reçu un placebo ou à l'absence de primaquine (quatre essais, 2 213 participants, preuves de qualité élevée ; suivi de 6 à 15 mois); mais le nombre de rechutes était inferieur lors d’un traitement de 14 jours à la primaquine (RR 0,6; IC à 95% de 0,48 à 0,75; dix essais, un total de 1 740 participants, preuves de qualité élevée ; suivi de sept semaines à 15 mois).

Aucun effet secondaire sévère n'a été signalé. Les effets indésirables limitant le traitement étaient rares et les effets indésirables bénins étaient légers et passagers. Les auteurs des essais ont rapporté que les personnes toléraient les médicaments.

Nous n’avons pas trouvé d'essais comparant un traitement à la primaquine avec une dose plus élevée (0,5 mg/kg/jour ou plus) pendant 5 jours ou plus par rapport au traitement de 14 jours.

Conclusions des auteurs

L'analyse confirme la recommandation actuelle de l’Organisation Mondiale de la Santé d’un traitement de 14 jours à la primaquine (15 mg/jour) pour prévenir la rechute du paludisme vivax. Des traitements à la primaquine de plus courte durée avec la même dose sont associés à un taux de rechute plus élevé. Les effets comparatifs avec un traitement hebdomadaire à la primaquine sont prometteurs, mais exigent d'autres essais pour établir l'équivalence ou la non-infériorité par rapport au traitement de 14 jours dans les zones de forte transmission du paludisme.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé scientifique
  5. Résumé simplifié

La primaquine pour la prévention des rechutes chez les patients atteints de paludisme Plasmodium vivax

Le paludisme Plasmodium vivax dû aux parasites est très répandu. L'Organisation mondiale de la Santé (OMS) recommande que les personnes atteintes de paludisme P. Vivax soient traitées avec la chloroquine pendant trois jours afin d’éliminer les parasites dans le sang qui provoquent les symptômes du paludisme, suivie de 15 mg/jour de primaquine pendant 14 jours pour traiter la phase hépatique de l'infection et prévenir toute récurrence de la maladie. Cependant, une fois qu’elles se sentent mieux suite au traitement à la chloroquine, de nombreuses personnes ne terminent pas le traitement à la primaquine. De plus, la primaquine peut détruire les globules rouges chez les personnes atteintes d'une déficience enzymatique génétique (glucose-6-phosphate-dehydrogenase enzyme (déficitenG6PD)) et les cliniciens évitent d'administrer la primaquine dans les zones réputées pour cette carence. Des traitements à la primaquine de plus courte durée pourraient potentiellement augmenter l'achèvement du traitement et réduire les effets indésirables.

Les auteurs de la revue ont inclus 15 essais de 4 377 adultes et enfants âgés de plus d'un an atteints de paludisme à Plasmodium vivax. Tous étaient traités à la chloroquine durant la période d’infection sanguine, puis randomisés au traitement de 14 jours à la primaquine, ou à un traitement à la primaquine d’une durée réduite (trois, cinq ou sept jours); ou à des doses plus élevées de primaquine administrées une fois par semaine pendant huit semaines; ou à un placebo ou à l'absence de traitement. Dans douze études, les traitements étaient supervisés. Les preuves sont actuelles en date du 8 octobre 2013.

Les rechutes au bout de six mois à un an sont probablement plus élevées avec des traitements plus courts que le traitement standard de 14 jours à la primaquine ( preuves de qualité modérée ). D'après les preuves disponibles, nous ne savons pas si le nombre de rechutes à la primaquine hebdomadaire diffère du traitement de 14 jours à la primaquine, ceci est basé sur une étude de 126 patients suivis pendant neuf mois ( preuves de très faible qualité ). Des études mieux conduites portant sur davantage de personnes sont nécessaires pour être certain qu'elles soient pareillement efficaces contre les rechutes. Quatre études ont démontré qu’un traitement de cinq jours à la primaquine était aussi inefficace contre les rechutes que le placebo ou l'absence de traitement, ceci de 6 à 15 mois. ( preuves de qualité élevée ). Le traitement de 14 jours à la primaquine évite les rechutes de paludisme à Plasmodium vivax pendant 12 mois chez beaucoup plus de personnes par rapport à un placebo ( preuves de qualité élevée ). Aucune réaction indésirable sévère à la primaquine n’a été rapportée.

Cette mise à jour de la revue confirme que le traitement de 14 jours à la primaquine recommandé par l'OMS est plus efficace contre les rechutes de paludisme à Plasmodium vivax que le traitement à la primaquine de plus courte durée.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 14th January, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Minist�re en charge de la Sant�