Intervention Review

Printed educational materials: effects on professional practice and healthcare outcomes

  1. Anik Giguère1,2,*,
  2. France Légaré3,
  3. Jeremy Grimshaw4,
  4. Stéphane Turcotte5,
  5. Michelle Fiander6,
  6. Agnes Grudniewicz7,
  7. Sun Makosso-Kallyth5,
  8. Fredric M Wolf8,
  9. Anna P Farmer9,
  10. Marie-Pierre Gagnon10

Editorial Group: Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group

Published Online: 17 OCT 2012

Assessed as up-to-date: 21 JUN 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004398.pub3


How to Cite

Giguère A, Légaré F, Grimshaw J, Turcotte S, Fiander M, Grudniewicz A, Makosso-Kallyth S, Wolf FM, Farmer AP, Gagnon MP. Printed educational materials: effects on professional practice and healthcare outcomes. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2012, Issue 10. Art. No.: CD004398. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004398.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Department of Clinical Epidemiology, McMaster University, Health Information Research Unit (HIRU), Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

  2. 2

    CHU de Quebec, St-Sacrement Hospital, Research Center of the Centre d'excellence sur le vieillissement de Quebec, Quebec City, Quebec, Canada

  3. 3

    Université Laval, Faculté de Médecine, Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec (CRCHUQ) - Hôpital St-François d'Assise, Département de Médicine Familiale et de Médicine d'Urgence, Québec, Québec, Canada

  4. 4

    Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, Clinical Epidemiology Program, Ottawa, ON, Canada

  5. 5

    St-François d'Assise Hospital, Research Centre of the CHU de Quebec, Québec City, Québec, Canada

  6. 6

    Centre for Practice Changing Research, Ottawa Hospital Research Institute (OHRI), Effective Practice & Organisation of Care (EPOC) Group, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada

  7. 7

    Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, St. Michael's Hospital, Institute of Health Policy, Management and Evaluation, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada

  8. 8

    University of Washington School of Medicine, Department of Medical Education & Biomedical Informatics, Seattle, WA, USA

  9. 9

    University of Alberta, Department of Agricultural, Food and Nutritional Science and The Centre for Health Promotion Studies, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada

  10. 10

    Centre de Recherche du CHU de Québec (CRCHUQ) - Hôpital St-François d'Assise, Faculté des Sciences Infirmières, Université Laval, Québec, Québec, Canada

*Anik Giguère, anikgiguere@videotron.ca.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 17 OCT 2012

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Printed educational materials are widely used passive dissemination strategies to improve the quality of clinical practice and patient outcomes. Traditionally they are presented in paper formats such as monographs, publication in peer-reviewed journals and clinical guidelines.

Objectives

To assess the effect of printed educational materials on the practice of healthcare professionals and patient health outcomes.

To explore the influence of some of the characteristics of the printed educational materials (e.g. source, content, format) on their effect on professional practice and patient outcomes.

Search methods

For this update, search strategies were rewritten and substantially changed from those published in the original review in order to refocus the search from published material to printed material and to expand terminology describing printed materials. Given the significant changes, all databases were searched from start date to June 2011. We searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), HealthStar, CINAHL, ERIC, CAB Abstracts, Global Health, and the EPOC Register.

Selection criteria

We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-randomised trials, controlled before and after studies (CBAs) and interrupted time series (ITS) analyses that evaluated the impact of printed educational materials (PEMs) on healthcare professionals' practice or patient outcomes, or both. We included three types of comparisons: (1) PEM versus no intervention, (2) PEM versus single intervention, (3) multifaceted intervention where PEM is included versus multifaceted intervention without PEM. There was no language restriction. Any objective measure of professional practice (e.g. number of tests ordered, prescriptions for a particular drug), or patient health outcomes (e.g. blood pressure) were included.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors undertook data extraction independently, and any disagreement was resolved by discussion among the review authors. For analyses, the included studies were grouped according to study design, type of outcome (professional practice or patient outcome, continuous or dichotomous) and type of comparison. For controlled trials, we reported the median effect size for each outcome within each study, the median effect size across outcomes for each study and the median of these effect sizes across studies. Where the data were available, we re-analysed the ITS studies and reported median differences in slope and in level for each outcome, across outcomes for each study, and then across studies. We categorised each PEM according to potential effects modifiers related to the source of the PEMs, the channel used for their delivery, their content, and their format.

Main results

The review includes 45 studies: 14 RCTs and 31 ITS studies. Almost all the included studies (44/45) compared the effectiveness of PEM to no intervention. One single study compared paper-based PEM to the same document delivered on CD-ROM. Based on seven RCTs and 54 outcomes, the median absolute risk difference in categorical practice outcomes was 0.02 when PEMs were compared to no intervention (range from 0 to +0.11). Based on three RCTs and eight outcomes, the median improvement in standardised mean difference for continuous profession practice outcomes was 0.13 when PEMs were compared to no intervention (range from -0.16 to +0.36). Only two RCTs and two ITS studies reported patient outcomes. In addition, we re-analysed 54 outcomes from 25 ITS studies, using time series regression and observed statistically significant improvement in level or in slope in 27 outcomes. From the ITS studies, we calculated improvements in professional practice outcomes across studies after PEM dissemination (standardised median change in level = 1.69). From the data gathered, we could not comment on which PEM characteristic influenced their effectiveness.

Authors' conclusions

The results of this review suggest that when used alone and compared to no intervention, PEMs may have a small beneficial effect on professional practice outcomes. There is insufficient information to reliably estimate the effect of PEMs on patient outcomes, and clinical significance of the observed effect sizes is not known. The effectiveness of PEMs compared to other interventions, or of PEMs as part of a multifaceted intervention, is uncertain.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Printed educational materials: effects on professional practice and healthcare outcomes

Medical journals and clinical practice guidelines are common channels to distribute scientific information to healthcare providers, as they allow a wide distribution at relatively low costs. Delivery of printed educational materials is meant to improve healthcare professionals' awareness, knowledge, attitudes, and skills, and ultimately improve professional practice and patients' health outcomes. Results of this review suggest that printed educational materials slightly improve healthcare professional practice compared to no intervention, but a lack of results prevent any conclusion on their impact on patient outcomes.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Supports éducatifs imprimés: Effets sur les pratiques professionnelles et les critères de jugement de santé

Contexte

Les supports éducatifs imprimés sont largement distribués, cette dissémination passive visant à améliorer la qualité des pratiques cliniques et les résultats des patients. Traditionnellement ils sont présentés sous format papier, tel que des monographies, des publications dans des revues à comité de lecture et des recommandations de pratique clinique.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'effet de supports éducatifs imprimés sur la pratique des professionnels de santé et des résultats cliniques.

Pour explorer l'influence de certaines des caractéristiques des supports éducatifs imprimés (par ex. source, de contenus format) sur leur effet sur les pratiques professionnelles et les résultats des patients.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Pour cette mise à jour, les stratégies de recherche ont été réécrites et substantiellement changées, afin de recentrer la recherche sur les documents imprimés et pour élargir la terminologie décrivant ceux-ci. Compte-tenu du changement significatif, toutes les bases de données ont été consultées depuis leur date de création jusqu' en juin 2011. Nous avons effectué des recherches dans: MEDLINE, EMBASE, le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL), HealthStar, CINAHL, ERIC, CAB Abstracts, Global Health, et le registre EPOC.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR), essais quasi-randomisés, études contrôlées avant-après (CAA) et les études de séries chronologiques interrompues (ITS) évaluant l'impact de supports éducatifs imprimés (SEIs) sur la pratique des professionnels de santé ou les résultats des patients, ou les deux. Nous avons inclus trois types de comparaisons: (1) SEI versus absence d'intervention, (2) SEI versus intervention unique, (3) intervention multidimensionnelle, inculant le SEI versus intervention multidimensionnelle sans SEI. Il n'y avait aucune restriction concernant la langue. Toute mesure objective de la pratique professionnelle (par ex. nombre de tests demandés, les prescriptions pour un médicament particulier), ou les résultats cliniques des patients (par ex. la pression artérielle) ont été inclus.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de revue ont entrepris l'extraction des données de manière indépendante, et les désaccords ont été résolus par discussion entre les auteurs de la revue. Pour les analyses, les études incluses ont été regroupés en fonction du plan d'étude, le type de critère de jugement (les pratiques professionnelles ou du patient, de résultats dichotomiques ou continus) et le type de comparaison. Pour les essais contrôlés, nous avons rapporté l'ampleur de l'effet médian pour chaque critère de jugement et pour chaque chaque étude, l'ampleur de l'effet médian pour les résultats pour chaque étude et la durée médiane de ces quantités d'effet pour l'ensemble des études. Lorsque les données étaient disponibles, nous avons ré analysés les études ITS et rapporté les différences médiane de pente pour chaque critère de jugement, l'ensemble des résultats pour chaque étude, puis les différences entre les études. Nous avons classé chaque SEI conformément aux effets potentiels, au canal utilisé pour leur distribution, à leur contenu, et enfin à leur format.

Résultats Principaux

La revue inclut 45 études: 14 ECR et 31 études ITS. Presque toutes les études incluses (44/45) ont comparé l'efficacité de SEI à l'absence d'intervention. Une seule étude avait comparé les SEI aux mêmes documents sur CD-ROM. D'après sept ECR et 54 critères de jugement, la différence de risque absolu médian, pour les critères de jugement (catégoriels) de pratique était de 0,02 lorsque les SEI ont été comparés à l'absence d'intervention (interval de 0 à +0.11). D'après trois ECR et huit critères de jugement, l'amélioration médiane dans la différence moyenne standardisée pour les critères de jugements de la pratique clinique étaient de 0,13 lorsque les SEI ont été comparés à l'absence d'intervention (plage de -0,16 à +0.36). Seule deux ECR et deux études STI ont rapportés les résultats des patients. En outre, nous avons réanalysé 54 critères de jugement de 25 études STI, à l'aide de régression de séries chronologiques et avons observés une amélioration statistiquement significative du niveau ou de la pente des 27 critères de jugement. Dans les études STI, nous avons retrouvés des améliorations dans les pratiques professionnelles après diffusion des SEI (changement median standardise de niveau =1.69). D'après les données recueillies, nous ne sommes pas en mesure de commenter sur la caractéristiques des STI qui influenceraient leur efficacité.

Conclusions des auteurs

Les résultats de cette revue suggèrent que lorsqu' ils sont utilisés seuls et par rapport à l'absence d'intervention, les STIs pourraient avoir un petiteffet bénéfique sur les pratiques professionnelles. Il n'existe pas suffisamment d'informations pour évaluer efficacement l'effet des STI sur les résultats des patients, et la signification clinique de la taille des effets observés n'est pas connue. L'efficacité des STIs par rapport à d'autres interventions, ou des STIs dans le cadre d'une intervention multidimensionnelle, est incertaine.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Supports éducatifs imprimés: Effets sur les pratiques professionnelles et les critères de jugement de santé

Supports éducatifs imprimés: Effets sur les pratiques professionnelles et les critères de jugement de santé

Les journaux médicaux ainsi que les recommandations de pratique clinique sont des canaux de diffusion de linformation scientifique auprès des acteurs de soins. Ils permettent une large distribution, à un relativement faible de coûts. Lutilisation de supports éducatifs imprimés doit permettre daméliorer létat des connaissances et les compétences des professionnels de santé, et ainsi d'améliorer les pratiques professionnelles et les résultats cliniques des patients.

Les résultats de cette revue suggèrent que les supports éducatifs imprimés améliorent légèrement les pratiques des professionnels de santé par rapport à l'absence d'intervention, mais un manque de résultats ne permettent pas de tirer de conclusions sur leur impact sur les résultats des patients.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 14th January, 2014
Traduction financée par: Minist�re des Affaires sociales et de la Sant�