Intervention Review

You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article

Oral evening primrose oil and borage oil for eczema

  1. Joel TM Bamford1,2,*,
  2. Sujoy Ray3,
  3. Alfred Musekiwa4,
  4. Christel van Gool5,
  5. Rosemary Humphreys6,
  6. Edzard Ernst7

Editorial Group: Cochrane Skin Group

Published Online: 30 APR 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 29 AUG 2012

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004416.pub2

How to Cite

Bamford JTM, Ray S, Musekiwa A, van Gool C, Humphreys R, Ernst E. Oral evening primrose oil and borage oil for eczema. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 4. Art. No.: CD004416. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004416.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Minnesota Medical School, Department of Family Medicine and Community Health, Duluth, Minnesota, USA

  2. 2

    Essentia Health System, Dematology Section (2S2W20), Duluth, Minnesota, USA

  3. 3

    Kasturba Medical College, Manipal University, Manipal, Karnataka, India

  4. 4

    University of the Witwatersrand, Wits Reproductive Health and HIV Institute (WRHI), Faculty of Health Sciences, Johannesburg, South Africa

  5. 5

    Maastricht University, Department of Epidemiology, CAPHRI, Maastricht, Netherlands

  6. 6

    The University of Nottingham, c/o Cochrane Skin Group, Nottingham, UK

  7. 7

    Peninsula Medical School, University of Exeter, Complementary Medicine Department, Exeter, UK

*Joel TM Bamford, Dematology Section (2S2W20), Essentia Health System, 400 East Third Street, PO 3247, Duluth, Minnesota, 55803-3247, USA. JoelTMBamford@yahoo.com. JoelTMBamford@icloud.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 30 APR 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Plain language summary

Background

Eczema is a chronic inflammatory skin condition, which usually develops in early childhood. Many children outgrow this disorder as they reach secondary school age, and although It may improve with age, there is no cure. Constant itch makes life uncomfortable for those with this condition, no matter what age they are, so it may have a significant effect on a person's quality of life. Its prevalence seems to be increasing as populations move from rural locations to cities. Some people, who do not see an adequate improvement or fear side-effects of conventional medical products, try complementary alternatives to conventional treatment. This is a review of evening primrose oil (EPO) and borage oil (BO) taken orally (by mouth); these have been thought to be beneficial because of their gamma-linolenic acid content.

Objectives

To assess the effects of oral evening primrose oil or borage oil for treating the symptoms of atopic eczema.

Search methods

We searched the following databases up to August 2012: Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (from 1946), EMBASE (from 1974), AMED (from 1985), and LILACS (from 1982). We also searched online trials registers and checked the bibliographies of included studies for further references to relevant trials. We corresponded with trial investigators and pharmaceutical companies to try to identify unpublished and ongoing trials. We performed a separate search for adverse effects of evening primrose oil and borage oil in November 2011.

Selection criteria

All randomised controlled, parallel, or cross-over trials investigating oral intake of evening primrose oil or borage oil for eczema.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently applied eligibility criteria, assessed risk of bias, and extracted data. We pooled dichotomous outcomes using risk ratios (RR), and continuous outcomes using the mean difference (MD). Where possible, we pooled study results using random-effects meta-analysis and tested statistical heterogeneity using both the Chi² test and the I² statistic test. We presented results using forest plots with 95% confidence intervals (CI).

Main results

A total of 27 studies (1596 participants) met the inclusion criteria: 19 studies assessed evening primrose oil, and 8 studies assessed borage oil. For EPO, a meta-analysis of results from 7 studies showed that EPO failed to significantly increase improvement in global eczema symptoms as reported by participants on a visual analogue scale of 0 to 100 (MD -2.22, 95% CI -10.48 to 6.04, 176 participants, 7 trials) and a visual analogue scale of 0 to 100 for medical doctors (MD -3.26, 95% CI -6.96 to 0.45, 289 participants, 8 trials) compared to the placebo group.

Treatment with BO also failed to significantly improve global eczema symptoms compared to placebo treatment as reported by both participants and medical doctors, although we could not conduct a meta-analysis as studies reported results in different ways. With regard to the risk of bias, the majority of studies were of low risk of bias; we judged 67% of the included studies as having low risk of bias for random sequence generation; 44%, for allocation concealment; 59%, for blinding; and 37%, for other biases.

Authors' conclusions

Implications for practice  

Oral borage oil and evening primrose oil lack effect on eczema; improvement was similar to respective placebos used in trials. Oral BO and EPO are not effective treatments for eczema.

In these studies, along with the placebos, EPO and BO have the same, fairly common, mild, transient adverse effects, which are mainly gastrointestinal.

The short-term studies included here do not examine possible adverse effects of long-term use of EPO or BO. A case report warned that if EPO is taken for a prolonged period of time (more than one year), there is a potential risk of inflammation, thrombosis, and immunosuppression; another study found that EPO may increase bleeding for people on Coumadin® (warfarin) medication.

Implications for research

Noting that the confidence intervals between active and placebo treatment are narrow, to exclude the possibility of any clinically useful difference, we concluded that further studies on EPO or BO for eczema would be hard to justify.

This review does not provide information about long-term use of these products.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Plain language summary

Oral evening primrose oil and borage oil for eczema

Eczema is an itchy and red skin condition, which may affect 20% of people world wide at some time in their life. Though it may improve with age, there is no cure. Many children outgrow this disorder as they reach secondary school age. Constant itch makes life uncomfortable for those with this condition, no matter what age they are.

Conventional medical treatments make life better for people; however, some people who do not see an adequate improvement in their eczema or fear side-effects of conventional medical products, turn to complementary alternatives to conventional medical treatment. This review is of two such products: evening primrose oil (EPO) and borage oil (BO) taken orally (by mouth), which have been thought to have benefits for eczema.

We included 27 studies, with 1596 adults and children from 12 countries. Of these, 19 studies compared EPO with a placebo (dummy) treatment, and 8 used BO compared with placebo. We looked for evidence of overall improvement in eczema and in quality of life. All 27 studies evaluated overall improvement of eczema, but only 2 studies of EPO measured improvement in quality of life. There was no statistically significant advantage demonstrated for either EPO or BO compared to placebo. In summary, we did not find evidence that eczema improved by taking these products any more than it did by taking placebo.

There was some evidence of mild and temporary side-effects for participants with either product or placebo, which were mainly mild, and included temporary headache and upset stomach or diarrhoea. With EPO there is an anticoagulant (blood-thinning) effect when taking these products. There is a warning with the blood thinner warfarin (Coumadin®) that taking EPO can increase bleeding. One report warns that if EPO is taken for a prolonged period of time (more than one year), there is a potential risk of inflammation, thrombosis, and immunosuppression due to slow accumulation of EPO in the tissues. Another reports a single case in which EPO was thought to have produced harms. We found no clinical evidence of such harm in these short-term trials.

This systematic review found no evidence that either BO or EPO are effective in treatment of eczema. Both of these products and the placebos used in the studies had similar mild, temporary side-effects, which were mainly gastrointestinal.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Plain language summary

Prise orale d'huile d'onagre et d'huile de bourrache dans l'eczéma

Contexte

L'eczéma est une affection cutanée inflammatoire chronique, qui se développe généralement pendant la petite enfance. Beaucoup d'enfants surmontent ce trouble à l'adolescence et bien qu'une amélioration soit possible avec l'âge, il n'existe aucun remède. Des démangeaisons permanentes perturbent la vie de ceux atteints de cette affection qui peut donc avoir des effets significatifs sur la qualité de vie d'une personne, quel que soit son âge. Sa prévalence semble augmenter à mesure que les populations quittent la campagne pour vivre en ville. Certaines personnes, qui ne constatent aucune amélioration satisfaisante ou qui craignent des effets secondaires des produits médicaux standard, se tournent vers des alternatives complémentaires aux traitements standard. Cette revue examine la prise orale (par la bouche) d'huile d'onagre (EPO) et d'huile de bourrache (BO) qui auraient des effets bénéfiques en raison de leur teneur riche en acide gamma-linolénique.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets liés à la prise orale d'huile d'onagre ou d'huile de bourrache pour le traitement des symptômes de l'eczéma atopique.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans les bases de données suivantes jusqu'à août 2012 : le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur la peau, CENTRAL dans The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (à partir de 1946), EMBASE (à partir de 1974) AMED (à partir de 1985) et LILACS (à partir de 1982). Nous avons également effectué des recherches dans les essais en ligne et consulté les bibliographies des études incluses afin de trouver des références supplémentaires dans les essais pertinents. Nous avons contacté par écrit les investigateurs des essais et les laboratoires pharmaceutiques pour essayer d'identifier des essais non publiés et en cours. En novembre 2011, nous avons réalisé des recherches séparées concernant les effets indésirables de l'huile d'onagre et de l'huile de bourrache.

Critères de sélection

Tous les essais randomisés contrôlés, parallèles ou croisés examinant la prise orale d'huile d'onagre ou d'huile de bourrache contre l'eczéma.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment appliqué des critères d'éligibilité, évalué les risques de biais et extrait des données. Nous avons regroupé les résultats dichotomiques en utilisant le risque relatif (RR) et les résultats continus en utilisant la différence moyenne (DM). Lorsque cela était possible, nous avons regroupé les résultats des études en utilisant une méta-analyse à effets aléatoires et testé l'hétérogénéité statistique avec le test du Chi² et le test I². Nous avons présenté ces résultats en utilisant des forest plots (graphiques en forêt) avec des intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95 %.

Résultats Principaux

Un total de 27 études (1 596 participants) répondaient aux critères d'inclusion : 19 études évaluaient l'huile d'onagre et 8 études évaluaient l'huile de bourrache. Pour l'EPO, une méta-analyse des résultats issus de 7 études montrait que l'EPO n'améliorait pas de manière significative les symptômes globaux de l'eczéma comme rapporté par les participants sur une échelle analogue visuelle de 0 à 100 (DM - 2,22, IC à 95 % - 10,48 à 6,04, 176 participants, 7 essais) et par les médecins sur une échelle analogue visuelle de 0 à 100 (DM - 3,26, IC à 95 % - 6,96 à 0,45, 289 participants, 8 essais) par rapport au groupe sous placebo.

De même, un traitement par BO n'améliorait pas significativement les symptômes globaux de l'eczéma par rapport à un traitement par placebo comme rapporté par les participants et les médecins. Cependant, nous n'avons pu réaliser aucune méta-analyse car les études rapportaient des résultats de diverses manières. Quant aux risques de biais, la majorité des études présentaient de faibles risques de biais ; nous avons estimé que 67 % des études incluses présentaient de faibles risques de biais pour la génération de séquences aléatoires ; 44 % pour l'assignation secrète ; 59 % pour la mise en aveugle et 37 % pour d'autres biais.

Conclusions des auteurs

Implications pour la pratique

La prise orale d'huile de bourrache et d'huile d'onagre n'a aucun effet sur l'eczéma ; les améliorations étaient similaires à celles des placebos respectifs utilisés dans les essais. Les traitements consistant à avaler de la BO et de l'EPO sont inefficaces contre l'eczéma.

Dans ces études, parallèlement aux placebos, l'EPO et la BO ont les mêmes effets indésirables transitoires, légers et relativement courants, qui sont principalement d'ordre gastro-intestinal.

Les études à court terme incluses ici n'examinent pas les éventuels effets indésirables liés à la prise prolongée d'EPO ou de BO. Une étude de cas mettait en garde contre la prise prolongée d'EPO (au-delà d'un an) qui pourrait provoquer des risques d'inflammations, de thromboses et d'immunosuppressions ; une autre étude a trouvé que l'EPO pouvait accroître les risques d'hémorragies chez les personnes prenant du Coumadin® (warfarine).

Implications pour la recherche

Compte tenu de l'étroitesse des intervalles de confiance entre un traitement actif et un traitement par placebo, afin d'exclure toute éventualité d'une différence cliniquement utile, nous avons conclu qu'il serait difficile de justifier des études supplémentaires sur l'EPO ou la BO dans le cas de l'eczéma.

La présente revue ne fournit aucune information concernant la prise prolongée de ces produits.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Plain language summary

Prise orale d'huile d'onagre et d'huile de bourrache dans l'eczéma

Prise orale d'huile d'onagre et d'huile de bourrache dans l'eczéma

L'eczéma est une affection cutanée, qui se caractérise par des démangeaisons et des rougeurs, pouvant toucher 20 % des personnes dans le monde à un certain moment de leur vie. Bien qu'une amélioration soit possible avec l'âge, il n'existe aucun remède. De nombreux enfants surmontent ce trouble à l'adolescence. Des démangeaisons permanentes perturbent la vie de ceux atteints de cette affection, et ce, quel que soit leur âge.

Des traitements médicaux standard permettent d'améliorer la vie de ces personnes. Toutefois, certaines d'entre elles, qui ne constatent pas d'amélioration significative de leur eczéma ou qui craignent des effets secondaires des produits médicaux standard, se tournent vers des alternatives complémentaires au traitement médical standard. La présente revue examine deux produits alternatifs : l'huile d'onagre (EPO pour « Evening Primrose Oil ») et l'huile de bourrache (BO pour « Borage Oil ») à prise orale (par la bouche), qui auraient des effets bénéfiques sur l'eczéma.

Nous avons inclus 27 études, composées de 1 596 adultes et enfants issus de 12 pays. Sur ce total, 19 études comparaient l'EPO à un traitement par placebo (factice) et 8 comparaient la BO à un placebo. Nous avons recherché des preuves concernant une amélioration globale de l'eczéma et de la qualité de vie. Toutes ces études (27) évaluaient une amélioration globale de l'eczéma, mais seules 2 études de l'EPO mesuraient une amélioration de la qualité de vie. Aucun effet bénéfique statistiquement significatif n'a été démontré pour l'EPO ou la BO par rapport à un placebo. En résumé, nous n'avons trouvé aucune preuve selon laquelle ces produits amélioreraient davantage l'eczéma par rapport à un placebo.

Il y avait des preuves d'effets secondaires légers (pour la plupart) et temporaires chez les participants prenant l'un des ces produits ou un placebo, notamment des céphalées temporaires et des maux d'estomac ou des diarrhées. Il existe un effet anticoagulant (fluidification sanguine) associé à la prise d'EPO. Il existe une mise en garde concernant la warfarine (Coumadin®), un fluidifiant sanguin, selon laquelle la prise d'EPO peut accroître les risques d'hémorragies. Un rapport met en garde contre la prise prolongée d'EPO (au-delà d'un an) qui pourrait accroître les risques d'inflammation, de thrombose et d'immunosuppression en raison d'un ralentissement de l'accumulation de l'EPO dans les tissus. D'autres rapports signalent un cas isolé dans lequel l'EPO serait nocive. Nous n'avons trouvé aucune preuve clinique de sa nocivité dans ces essais à court terme.

Cette revue systématique n'a trouvé aucune preuve selon laquelle la BO et l'EPO sont efficaces pour le traitement de l'eczéma. Ces deux produits et les placebos utilisés dans les études présentaient des effets secondaires légers et temporaires, principalement d'ordre gastro-intestinal.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 13th November, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Plain language summary

Ulje žutog noćurka i boraga za ekcem

Ulje žutog noćurka i boraga za ekcem

Ekcem je poremećaj obilježen svrbežom i crvenilom kože. Pogađa i do 20% djece širom svijeta tijekom života. Iako se može popraviti s dobi, nema izlječenja. Mnoga djeca prerastu ovaj poremećaj do srednje škole. Neprestani svrbež osobama koje pate od ekcema čini život vrlo neugodnim, bez obzira na to koliko su stari.

Konvencionalna terapija olakšava ljudima život, međutim, neki pacijenti koji ne vide prikladno poboljšanje ekcema nakon liječenja standardnim medicinskim postupcima okreću se komplementarnim i alternativnim terapijama. Ovaj je Cochrane sustavni pregled istražio dva takva proizvoda – ulje žutog noćurka i ulje boraga, koji se uzimaju na usta i za koje se smatra da mogu pomoći oboljelima od ekcema.

Analizirano je 27 studija s ukupno 1596 odraslih i djece iz 12 zemalja. U 19 studija uspoređeno je ulje žutoga noćurka s placebom, a u preostalih 9 ulje boraga s placebom. Istražen je učinak na poboljšanje ekcema i kvalitetu života. Svih 27 studija istražilo je poboljšanje ekcema, ali samo 2 studije ulja žutog noćurka su istražile poboljšanje kvalitete života. Zaključak je analize svih studija da nema statistički značajne prednosti ulja žutog noćurka niti ulja boraga, u usporedbi s placebom. Zaključno, nisu pronađeni dokazi da se ekcem poboljšava nakon uzimanja ovih pripravaka – ništa više nego nakon uzimanja placeba.

Pronađeni su dokazi o pojavama blagih i privremenih nuspojava kod ispitanika nakon uzimanja opisanih pripravaka ili placeba, koje su uključivale glavobolju, nelagodu u stomaku ili proljev. Uzimanje ulja žutog noćurka bilo je povezano s antikoagulantnim učinkom (razrjeđenje krvi). U jednoj je studiji objavljeno upozorenje da ulje žutoga noćurka, ako se uzima dulje vrijeme (dulje od godine dana) može potencijalno uzrokovati upale, trombozu i potiskivanje imunološkog sustava zbog polaganog nakupljanja ulja žutoga nožurka u tkivima. Druga je studija prijavila svega jedan slučaj nuspojava nakon uzimanja ulja žutoga nožurka. Nisu pronađeni dokazi za takve štete u kratkoročnim istraživanjima.

Sustavni pregled nije pronašao dokaze da su ulje žutoga noćurka ili ulje boraga učinkoviti za liječenje ekcema. Oba proizvoda, kao i placebo koji je korišten u opisanim studijama, imala su blage i privremene nuspojave koje su uglavnom bile probavne.

Translation notes

Translated by: Croatian Branch of the Italian Cochrane Centre 13th November, 2013