Intervention Review

Stage-based interventions for smoking cessation

  1. Kate Cahill1,*,
  2. Tim Lancaster1,
  3. Natasha Green2

Editorial Group: Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group

Published Online: 10 NOV 2010

Assessed as up-to-date: 27 AUG 2010

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004492.pub4


How to Cite

Cahill K, Lancaster T, Green N. Stage-based interventions for smoking cessation. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2010, Issue 11. Art. No.: CD004492. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004492.pub4.

Author Information

  1. 1

    University of Oxford, Department of Primary Health Care, Oxford, UK

  2. 2

    London, UK

*Kate Cahill, Department of Primary Health Care, University of Oxford, Rosemary Rue Building, Old Road Campus, Oxford, OX3 7LF, UK. kate.cahill@dphpc.ox.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 10 NOV 2010

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Background

The transtheoretical model is the most widely known of several stage-based theories of behaviour. It proposes that smokers move through a discrete series of motivational stages before they quit successfully. These are precontemplation (no thoughts of quitting), contemplation (thinking about quitting), preparation (planning to quit in the next 30 days), action (quitting successfully for up to six months), and maintenance (no smoking for more than six months). According to this influential model, interventions which help people to stop smoking should be tailored to their stage of readiness to quit, and are designed to move them forward through subsequent stages to eventual success. People in the preparation and action stages of quitting would require different types of support from those in precontemplation or contemplation.

Objectives

Our primary objective was to test the effectiveness of stage-based interventions in helping smokers to quit.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group's specialised register for trials, using the terms ('stage* of change', 'transtheoretical model*', 'trans-theoretical model*, 'precaution adoption model*', 'health action model', 'processes of change questionnaire*', 'readiness to change', 'tailor*') and 'smoking' in the title or abstract, or as keywords. The latest search was in August 2010.

Selection criteria

We included randomized controlled trials, which compared stage-based interventions with non-stage-based controls, with 'usual care' or with assessment only. We excluded trials which did not report a minimum follow-up period of six months from start of treatment, and those which measured stage of change but did not modify their intervention in the light of it.

Data collection and analysis

We extracted data in duplicate on the participants, the dose and duration of intervention, the outcome measures, the randomization procedure, concealment of allocation, and completeness of follow up.

The main outcome was abstinence from smoking for at least six months. We used the most rigorous definition of abstinence, and preferred biochemically validated rates where reported. Where appropriate we performed meta-analysis to estimate a pooled risk ratio, using the Mantel-Haenszel fixed-effect model.

Main results

We found 41 trials (>33,000 participants) which met our inclusion criteria. Four trials, which directly compared the same intervention in stage-based and standard versions, found no clear advantage for the staging component. Stage-based versus standard self-help materials (two trials) gave a relative risk (RR) of 0.93 (95% CI 0.62 to 1.39). Stage-based versus standard counselling (two trials) gave a relative risk of 1.00 (95% CI 0.82 to 1.22). Six trials of stage-based self-help systems versus any standard self-help support demonstrated a benefit for the staged groups, with an RR of 1.27 (95% CI 1.01 to 1.59). Twelve trials comparing stage-based self help with 'usual care' or assessment-only gave an RR of 1.32 (95% CI 1.17 to 1.48). Thirteen trials of stage-based individual counselling versus any control condition gave an RR of 1.24 (95% CI 1.08 to 1.42). These findings are consistent with the proven effectiveness of these interventions in their non-stage-based versions. The evidence was unclear for telephone counselling, interactive computer programmes or training of doctors or lay supporters. This uncertainty may be due in part to smaller numbers of trials.

Authors' conclusions

Based on four trials using direct comparisons, stage-based self-help interventions (expert systems and/or tailored materials) and individual counselling were neither more nor less effective than their non-stage-based equivalents. Thirty-one trials of stage-based self help or counselling interventions versus any control condition demonstrated levels of effectiveness which were comparable with their non-stage-based counterparts. Providing these forms of practical support to those trying to quit appears to be more productive than not intervening. However, the additional value of adapting the intervention to the smoker's stage of change is uncertain. The evidence is not clear for other types of staged intervention, including telephone counselling, interactive computer programmes and training of physicians or lay supporters. The evidence does not support the restriction of quitting advice and encouragement only to those smokers perceived to be in the preparation and action stages.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Are stage-based interventions more effective than non-stage-based ones in helping smokers to quit?

The transtheoretical model is one of several stage-based theories of behaviour change. It suggests that smokers move through a series of motivational stages before they manage to stop smoking. These are precontemplation (no thoughts of quitting), contemplation (thinking about quitting), preparation (planning to quit in the next 30 days), action (quitting successfully for up to six months), and maintenance (no smoking for more than six months). According to this widely-known theory, programmes which help people to stop smoking should be matched to their stage of readiness to quit. They are designed to move them forward through the stages to eventual success. In this review, we have compared stage-based programmes of smoking cessation with standard (unstaged) programmes, or with 'usual care', or with assessment only. We found 41 stage-based trials, covering more than 33,000 smokers, which measured quit rates at least six months after treatment. Only four of the 41 trials directly compared the same intervention in a standard and a stage-based version. This showed that the stage-based version was neither more nor less effective than the standard one. Eighteen trials which compared stage-based self-help programmes with any control condition showed better success rates for the intervention groups. Thirteen trials of stage-based individual counselling versus any control condition showed a similar benefit for the intervention groups. These findings confirm the known effectiveness of these interventions, whether staged or unstaged. The evidence was less clear on the effects of stage-based telephone counselling, interactive computer programmes or training of doctors and helpers. This uncertainty may be due in part to smaller numbers of trials. We find on the evidence from this review that providing self-help or counselling support to smokers trying to quit is more effective than 'usual care' or simple observation. However, the extra value of fitting that support to the smoker's stage of change is currently unclear.

 

Resumen

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Antecedentes

Intervenciones basadas en estadios para el abandono del hábito de fumar

El modelo transteórico es el más conocido de varias teorías de la conducta basadas en estadios. Este modelo sostiene que los fumadores pasan por una variedad de estadios de motivación antes de abandonar el hábito de fumar completamente. Estos estadios incluyen estadio previo a la contemplación (el fumador no considera la posibilidad de abandonar el hábito de fumar), contemplación (considera la posibilidad de abandonar el hábito), preparación (considera abandonar el hábito los siguientes 30 días), acción (el fumador abandona el hábito durante un tiempo de hasta seis meses) y mantenimiento (no fuma durante más de seis meses). Según este modelo influyente, las intervenciones que ayudan a las personas a abandonar el hábito de fumar deben adaptarse al estadio de disposición para abandonar el hábito de fumar, y están diseñadas para que los fumadores pasen por los estadios hasta abandonar el hábito completamente. Las personas que se encuentran en los estadios de preparación y acción requieren tipos de apoyo diferentes que las personas en el estadio previo a la contemplación y el estadio de contemplación.

Objetivos

El objetivo primario fue evaluar la efectividad de las intervenciones basadas en estadios para ayudar a los fumadores a abandonar el hábito.

Estrategia de búsqueda

Se realizó una búsqueda en el Registro Especializado de Ensayos Controlados del Grupo Cochrane de Adicción al Tabaco (Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group) con los términos (‘stage∗ of change’, ‘transtheoretical model∗’, ‘transtheoretical model∗’, ‘precaution adoption model∗’, ‘health action model’, ‘processes of change questionnaire∗’, ‘readiness to change’, ‘tailor∗’) y ‘smoking’ en el título o resumen, o como palabra clave. La última búsqueda se realizó en agosto 2010.

Criterios de selección

Se incluyeron ensayos controlados con asignación aleatoria, que compararon intervenciones basadas en estadios con controles de otro tipo, atención habitual o con evaluación sola. Se excluyeron los ensayos que no informaron un período de seguimiento mínimo de seis meses desde el comienzo del tratamiento, y los que midieron el estadio de cambio, pero no modificaron su intervención en función de éste.

Obtención y análisis de los datos

Se extrajeron por duplicado los datos sobre el tipo de participantes, la dosis y la duración de la intervención, las medidas de resultado, el procedimiento de asignación al azar, la ocultación de la asignación y el cumplimiento del seguimiento.

La principal medida de resultado fue la abstinencia del hábito de fumar en al menos seis meses. Se utilizó la definición más rigurosa de abstinencia y se prefirieron las tasas validadas bioquímicamente, cuando se informaron. Cuando fue apropiado, se realizó un metanálisis para estimar un cociente de riesgos con el modelo de efectos fijos de MantelHaenszel.

Resultados principales

Se encontraron 41 ensayos (>33 000 participantes) que cumplieron los criterios de inclusión. Cuatro ensayos, que compararon directamente la misma intervención en las versiones basadas en estadios y las versiones estándar, no encontraron ninguna ventaja clara para el componente de estadíos. Los materiales de autoayuda basados en estadíos versus estándar (dos ensayos) arrojaron un riesgo relativo (RR) de 0,93 (IC del 95%: 0,62 a 1,39). El asesoramiento basado en estadios versus estándar (dos ensayos) resultó en un riesgo relativo de 1,00 (IC del 95%: 0,82 a 1,22). Seis ensayos de sistemas de autoayuda basados en estadios versus cualquier tipo de autoayuda estándar mostraron un beneficio para los grupos basados en estadios, con un RR de 1,27 (IC del 95%: 1,01 a 1,59). Doce ensayos que compararon autoayuda basada en estadios con “atención habitual” o evaluación solamente arrojaron un RR de 1,32 (IC del 95%: 1,17 a 1,48). Trece ensayos de asesoramiento basado en estadios versus cualquier condición de control arrojaron un RR de 1,24 (IC del 95%: 1,08 a 1,42). Estos resultados son compatibles con la efectividad comprobada de estas intervenciones en sus versiones que no están basadas en estadios. Las pruebas fueron inciertas para el asesoramiento telefónico, los programas informáticos interactivos o la capacitación de los médicos o los asistentes legos. Esta incertidumbre puede deberse, en parte, al número pequeño de ensayos.

Conclusiones de los autores

En función de cuatro ensayos que usaron comparaciones directas, las intervenciones de autoayuda basadas en estadios (sistemas especializados o materiales adaptados) y el asesoramiento individual no fueron ni más ni menos efectivos que sus equivalentes basadas en estadios. Treinta y un ensayos de intervenciones basadas en estadios de autoayuda o asesoramiento versus cualquier condición de control mostraron niveles de efectividad equivalentes a las mismas intervenciones pero sin estadios. La provisión de estas formas de apoyo práctico a los participantes que intentan abandonar el hábito de fumar parece ser más eficaz que ninguna intervención. Sin embargo, el valor adicional de adaptar la intervención al estadio de cambio del fumador es incierto. Las pruebas son inciertas para otros tipos de intervenciones basadas en estadios, incluido el asesoramiento telefónico, los programas informáticos interactivos y capacitación de los médicos o los asistentes legos. Las pruebas no apoyan la restricción del asesoramiento y la estimulación para abandonar el hábito de fumar solamente a los fumadores que se encuentran en los estadios de preparación y acción.

Traducción

Traducción realizada por el Centro Cochrane Iberoamericano

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Les interventions de sevrage tabagique basées sur les étapes

Contexte

Le modèle transthéorique est la théorie comportementale basée sur les étapes la plus connue. Il suppose que les fumeurs passent par une série d'étapes de motivation avant de réussir à s'arrêter de fumer. Il s'agit de la précontemplation (aucune pensée de sevrage tabagique), contemplation (pense à arrêter de fumer), préparation (planifie l'arrêt de fumer sous 30 jours), action (arrête effectivement de fumer pendant six mois) et maintien (ne fume pas depuis plus de six mois). Selon ce modèle influent, les interventions destinées à aider les gens à arrêter de fumer doivent être adaptées à l'étape de préparation au sevrage où ils se trouvent et sont conçues pour les faire passer à travers les étapes successives jusqu'à la réussite finale. Les personnes se trouvant dans les étapes de préparation et d'action du sevrage nécessiteraient des soutiens de types différents de celles se trouvant dans les étapes de précontemplation ou de contemplation.

Objectifs

Notre objectif principal était de tester l'efficacité des interventions basées sur les étapes pour ce qui est d'aider au sevrage des fumeurs.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre spécialisé des essais du groupe Cochrane sur le tabagisme, au moyen des termes ('stage* of change', 'transtheoretical model*', 'trans-theoretical model*, 'precaution adoption model*', 'health action model', 'processes of change questionnaire*', 'readiness to change', 'tailor*') et 'smoking' dans le titre ou le résumé ou comme mots-clés. La dernière recherche a été effectuée en août 2010.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus des essais contrôlés randomisés comparant des interventions basées sur les étapes à des contrôles non basés sur les étapes, aux 'soins habituels' ou à la seule évaluation. Nous avons exclu les essais qui ne rendaient pas compte d'une période de suivi minimale de six mois à compter du début du traitement, ainsi que ceux qui mesuraient l'étape du changement mais ne modifiaient pas leur intervention en fonction de cela.

Recueil et analyse des données

Nous avons extrait en double les données sur les participants, la dose et la durée de l'intervention, les mesures de résultat, la procédure de randomisation, l’assignation secrète et l'exhaustivité du suivi.

Le principal critère de résultat était l'abstinence tabagique pendant au moins six mois. Nous avons utilisé la définition la plus rigoureuse de l'abstinence et avons préféré, lorsqu'ils étaient disponibles, les taux validés biochimiquement. Lorsque cela était possible, nous avons effectué une méta-analyse pour évaluer un risque relatif global au moyen du modèle à effet fixe de Mantel-Haenszel.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons trouvé 41 essais (> 33 000 participants) répondant à nos critères d'inclusion. Quatre essais qui avaient comparé directement la même intervention dans les versions standard et basée sur les étapes, n'avaient pas trouvé d'avantage évident à l'utilisation de l'étape. Le matériel d'auto-assistance basé sur les étapes versus standard (deux essais) donnait un risque relatif (RR) de 0,93 (IC à 95 % 0,62 à 1,39). Le counselling basé sur les étapes versus standard (deux essais) donnait un risque relatif de 1,00 (IC à 95 % 0,82 à 1,22). Six essais de systèmes d'auto-assistance basés sur les étapes versus une auto-assistance standard ont mis en lumière un avantage pour les groupes basés sur étapes, avec un RR de 1,27 (IC à 95 % de 1,01 à 1,59). Douze essais comparant une auto-assistance basée sur les étapes aux « soins habituels » ou à la seule évaluation donnaient un RR de 1,32 (IC à 95 % de 1,17 à 1,48). Treize essais de counselling individuel basé sur les étapes versus un type quelconque de contrôle donnaient un RR de 1,24 (IC à 95 % de 1,08 à 1,42). Ces résultats sont cohérents avec l'efficacité prouvée de ces interventions dans leurs versions non basées sur les étapes. Les résultats n'étaient pas clairs pour le counselling téléphonique, les programmes informatiques interactifs ou la formation des médecins ou des personnes proches. Cette incertitude pourrait être due en partie aux plus petits nombres d'essais.

Conclusions des auteurs

Sur la base de quatre essais effectuant des comparaisons directes, les interventions d'auto-assistance (systèmes experts et / ou matériels sur mesure) et de counselling individuel basées sur les étapes n'étaient ni plus ni moins efficaces que leurs équivalentes non basées sur les étapes. Trente et un essais sur des interventions d'auto-assistance ou de counselling basées sur les étapes versus un type quelconque de contrôle ont décrit des niveaux d'efficacité qui étaient comparables à leurs homologues non basées sur les étapes. Fournir ces formes de soutien pratique aux personnes qui essaient d'arrêter de fumer semble être plus productif que de ne pas intervenir. Toutefois, la valeur supplémentaire apportée par l'adaptation de l'intervention à l'étape de changement où se trouve le fumeur est incertaine. Les résultats ne sont pas clairs pour les autres types d'interventions basées sur les étapes, telles que le counselling téléphonique, les programmes informatiques interactifs et la formation des médecins ou des personnes proches. Les données disponibles n'étayent pas l'idée qu'il faille restreindre les conseils et les encouragements de sevrage tabagique aux seuls fumeurs perçus comme étant dans les étapes de préparation et d'action.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Résumé
  6. Résumé simplifié

Les interventions de sevrage tabagique basées sur les étapes

Les interventions basées sur les étapes sont-elles plus efficaces que les autres pour aider au sevrage des fumeurs ?

Le modèle transthéorique est une théorie de changement comportemental basée sur les étapes. Il suppose que les fumeurs passent par une série d'étapes de motivation avant de s'occuper d'arrêter de fumer. Il s'agit de la précontemplation (aucune pensée de sevrage tabagique), contemplation (pense à arrêter de fumer), préparation (planifie l'arrêt de fumer sous 30 jours), action (arrête effectivement de fumer pendant six mois) et maintien (ne fume pas depuis plus de six mois). D'après cette théorie très connue, les programmes qui aident les gens à arrêter de fumer devraient être adaptés à l'étape de préparation au sevrage où ils se trouvent. Ils sont conçus pour les faire progresser d'étape en étape vers la réussite finale. Dans cette revue, nous avons comparé des programmes de sevrage tabagique basés sur les étapes aux programmes standard (sans étapes), aux 'soins classiques' ou à la seule évaluation. Nous avons trouvé 41 essais basés sur les étapes, soit plus de 33 000 fumeurs au total, ayant mesuré les taux de sevrage six mois au moins après le traitement. Seuls quatre des 41 essais avaient effectué une comparaison directe de la même intervention en version standard et en version basée sur les étapes. Cela a montré que la version basée sur les étapes n'était ni plus ni moins efficace que la version standard Dix-huit essais qui ont comparé des programmes d'auto-assistance basés sur les étapes avec un type quelconque de contrôle, ont observé de meilleurs taux de réussite dans les groupes avec intervention. Treize essais de counselling individuel basé sur les étapes versus un quelconque type de contrôle, ont montré un bénéfice similaire pour les groupes de l'intervention. Ces résultats confirment l'efficacité connue de ces interventions, qu'elles soient ou non basées sur les étapes. Les résultats étaient moins clairs concernant les effets du counselling téléphonique, des programmes informatiques interactifs ou de la formation par des médecins et des auxiliaires, basés sur les étapes. Cette incertitude peut être due en partie aux plus petits nombres d'essais. Il apparait des résultats de cette revue que la fourniture d'un soutien d'auto-assistance ou de counselling aux personnes qui essaient d'arrêter de fumer est plus efficace que les « soins habituels » ou que la simple observation. Toutefois, la valeur supplémentaire apportée par l'adaptation de ce soutien à l'étape de changement où se trouve le fumeur n'est pour l'instant pas claire.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 29th August, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français