Intervention Review

Speed cameras for the prevention of road traffic injuries and deaths

  1. Cecilia Wilson1,*,
  2. Charlene Willis2,
  3. Joan K Hendrikz1,
  4. Robyne Le Brocque1,
  5. Nicholas Bellamy1

Editorial Group: Cochrane Injuries Group

Published Online: 10 NOV 2010

Assessed as up-to-date: 3 MAY 2010

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004607.pub4


How to Cite

Wilson C, Willis C, Hendrikz JK, Le Brocque R, Bellamy N. Speed cameras for the prevention of road traffic injuries and deaths. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2010, Issue 11. Art. No.: CD004607. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004607.pub4.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Mayne Medical School, The University of Queensland, Centre of National Research on Disability and Rehabilitation Medicine, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

  2. 2

    The University of Queensland, Queensland Institute of Medical Research (QIMR), Brisbane, Queensland, Australia

*Cecilia Wilson, Centre of National Research on Disability and Rehabilitation Medicine, Mayne Medical School, The University of Queensland, Herston Road, Herston, Brisbane, Queensland, 4006, Australia. c.wilson2@uq.edu.au. ceciliamwilson@bigpond.com.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 10 NOV 2010

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

It is estimated that by 2020, road traffic crashes will have moved from ninth to third in the world ranking of burden of disease, as measured in disability adjusted life years. The prevention of road traffic injuries is of global public health importance. Measures aimed at reducing traffic speed are considered essential to preventing road injuries; the use of speed cameras is one such measure.

Objectives

To assess whether the use of speed cameras reduces the incidence of speeding, road traffic crashes, injuries and deaths.

Search methods

We searched the following electronic databases covering all available years up to May 2010: the Cochrane Library, MEDLINE (WebSPIRS), EMBASE (WebSPIRS), TRANSPORT, IRRD (International Road Research Documentation), TRANSDOC (European Conference of Ministers of Transport databases), Web of Science (Science and Social Science Citation Index), PsycINFO, CINAHL, EconLit, WHO database, Sociological Abstracts, Dissertation Abstracts, Index to Theses.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials, interrupted time series and controlled before-after studies that assessed the impact of speed cameras on speeding, road crashes, crashes causing injury and fatalities were eligible for inclusion.

Data collection and analysis

We independently screened studies for inclusion, extracted data, assessed methodological quality, reported study authors' outcomes and where possible, calculated standardised results based on the information available in each study. Due to considerable heterogeneity between and within included studies, a meta-analysis was not appropriate.

Main results

Thirty five studies met the inclusion criteria. Compared with controls, the relative reduction in average speed ranged from 1% to 15% and the reduction in proportion of vehicles speeding ranged from 14% to 65%. In the vicinity of camera sites, the pre/post reductions ranged from 8% to 49% for all crashes and 11% to 44% for fatal and serious injury crashes. Compared with controls, the relative improvement in pre/post injury crash proportions ranged from 8% to 50%.

Authors' conclusions

Despite the methodological limitations and the variability in degree of signal to noise effect, the consistency of reported reductions in speed and crash outcomes across all studies show that speed cameras are a worthwhile intervention for reducing the number of road traffic injuries and deaths. However, whilst the the evidence base clearly demonstrates a positive direction in the effect, an overall magnitude of this effect is currently not deducible due to heterogeneity and lack of methodological rigour. More studies of a scientifically rigorous and homogenous nature are necessary, to provide the answer to the magnitude of effect.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Do speed cameras reduce road traffic crashes, injuries and deaths?

Road traffic crashes are a major cause of death and disability. The speed at which a vehicle travels is an important determinant of injury; the faster the vehicle is travelling, the greater the energy inflicted on the occupants during a crash, and the greater the injury.

Excessive speed (driving faster than the posted limit or too fast for the prevailing conditions) has been found to contribute to a substantial number of crashes. It is predicted that, if the number of speeding drivers is reduced, both the likelihood and severity of a crash will be lowered. Therefore, interventions aimed at reducing traffic speed are considered essential to preventing road injuries and deaths. The enforcement of safe speeds with speed cameras and associated automated devices is one such measure.

To evaluate the effectiveness of speed cameras, the authors examined all eligible studies, that is, studies that met pre-set standard criteria. We analysed the effect of speed cameras on speeding, road traffic crashes, injuries and deaths by comparing what was happening in road areas before the introduction of speed cameras and after their introduction, and also by analysing what was happening in comparable road areas where no speed cameras were introduced during the study period.

The authors accepted a total of 35 studies for review which met the pre-set criteria. All studies reporting speed outcomes reported a reduction in average speeds post intervention with speed cameras. Speed was also reported as either reductions in the percentage of speeding vehicles (drivers), as percentage speeding reductions over various speed limits, or as reductions in percentages of top end speeders. A reduction in the proportion of speeding vehicles (drivers) over the accepted posted speed limit, ranged from 8% to 70% with most countries reporting reductions in the 10 to 35% range.

Twenty eight studies measured the effect on crashes. All 28 studies found a lower number of crashes in the speed camera areas after implementation of the program. In the vicinity of camera sites, the reductions ranged from 8% to 49% for all crashes, with reductions for most studies in the 14% to 25% range. For injury crashes the decrease ranged between 8% to 50% and for crashes resulting in fatalities or serious injuries the reductions were in the range of 11% to 44%. Effects over wider areas showed reductions for all crashes ranging from 9% to 35%, with most studies reporting reductions in the 11% to to 27% range. For crashes resulting in death or serious injury reductions ranged from 17% to 58%, with most studies reporting this result in the 30% to 40% reduction range. The studies of longer duration showed that these positive trends were either maintained or improved with time.

The quality of the included studies in this review was judged as being of overall moderate quality at best, however, the consistency of reported positive reductions in speed and crash results across all studies show that speed cameras are a worthwhile intervention for reducing the number of road traffic injuries and deaths. To affirm this finding, higher quality studies, using well designed controlled trials where possible, and studies conducted over adequate length of time (including lengthy follow-up periods) with sufficient data collection points, both before and after the implementation of speed cameras, are needed. As none of the studies were conducted in low-income countries, research in such settings is also required. There is a greater need for consistency in methods, such as international standards for the collection and reporting of speed and crash data and agreed methods for controlling bias in studies. This would allow more reliable study comparisons across countries, and therefore greater ability to provide stronger scientific evidence for the beneficial effects of speed cameras.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Radars de contrôle routier pour la prévention des blessures et décès liés aux accidents de la route

Contexte

On estime que d'ici à 2020, les accidents de la route seront passés de la neuvième à la troisième place du classement mondial du fardeau des maladies mesuré sous forme d'années de vie ajustées sur l'incapacité. La prévention des blessures liées aux accidents de la route est une question de santé publique d'importance mondiale. Les mesures visant à réduire la vitesse de circulation sont considérées comme essentielles pour prévenir les blessures liées aux accidents de la route ; l'utilisation de radars de contrôle routier en fait partie.

Objectifs

Déterminer si l'utilisation de radars de contrôle routier réduit l'incidence des excès de vitesse, des accidents de la route, des blessures et des décès.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans les bases de données électroniques suivantes (toutes les années disponibles jusqu'en mai 2010) : la Bibliothèque Cochrane, MEDLINE (WebSPIRS), EMBASE (WebSPIRS), TRANSPORT, IRRD (International Road Research Documentation), TRANSDOC (European Conference of Ministers of Transport databases), Web of Science (Science and Social Science Citation Index), PsycINFO, CINAHL, EconLit, la base de données de l'OMS, Sociological Abstracts, Dissertation Abstracts et Index to Theses.

Critères de sélection

Les essais contrôlés randomisés, les études de séries chronologiques interrompues et les études contrôlées avant-après évaluant l'impact des radars de contrôle routier sur les excès de vitesse, les accidents de la route et les accidents entraînant des blessures et des décès étaient éligibles dans la revue.

Recueil et analyse des données

Nous avons sélectionné de manière indépendante les études à inclure, extrait les données, évalué la qualité méthodologique et les critères de jugement rapportés par les auteurs des études et, dans la mesure du possible, calculé les résultats standardisés sur la base des informations disponibles dans chaque étude. Compte tenu de l'hétérogénéité considérable entre et au sein des études incluses, aucune méta-analyse n'a été effectuée.

Résultats Principaux

Trente-cinq études remplissaient les critères d'inclusion. Par rapport aux interventions témoins, la réduction relative de la vitesse moyenne était comprise entre 1 et 15 %, et la réduction du nombre de véhicules en excès de vitesse était comprise entre 14 et 65 %. À proximité des zones contrôlées par radar, les réductions avant/après étaient comprises entre 8 et 49 % pour l'ensemble des accidents, et entre 11 et 44 % pour les accidents entraînant des décès et des blessures graves. Par rapport aux interventions témoins, l'amélioration relative du nombre d'accidents entraînant des blessures avant/après était comprise entre 8 et 50 %.

Conclusions des auteurs

Malgré les limitations méthodologiques et la variabilité du rapport signal sur bruit, la cohérence des réductions de la vitesse et des accidents rapportées dans toutes les études montrent que les radars de contrôle routier sont une intervention utile pour réduire le nombre de blessures et de décès liés à des accidents de la route. Toutefois, bien que la base factuelle indique clairement une direction positive de l'effet, son ampleur globale ne peut pas être établie à l'heure actuelle en raison de l'hétérogénéité des essais et de leur manque de rigueur méthodologique. D'autres études plus rigoureuses et homogènes d'un point de vue scientifique sont nécessaires afin d'établir l'ampleur de cet effet.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Radars de contrôle routier pour la prévention des blessures et décès liés aux accidents de la route

Les radars de contrôle routier réduisent-ils les accidents de la route, les blessures et les décès ?

Les accidents de la route sont une cause majeure de décès et d'invalidité. La vitesse du véhicule est un facteur déterminant du risque de blessures ; plus la vitesse est élevée, plus l'énergie absorbée par les occupants en cas de collision est forte, et plus les blessures sont graves.

Il a été établi qu'une vitesse excessive (supérieure à la limite autorisée ou excessive compte tenu des conditions de circulation) était partiellement responsable d'un grand nombre d'accidents. On considère donc que la réduction de la vitesse de circulation réduit la probabilité et la gravité d'un accident. Par conséquent, les interventions visant à réduire la vitesse de circulation sont considérées comme essentielles pour prévenir les blessures et les décès liés aux accidents de la route. Les contrôles de vitesse utilisant des radars et d'autres dispositifs automatisés font partie de ces mesures.

Pour évaluer l'efficacité des radars de contrôle routier, les auteurs ont examiné toutes les études éligibles, c.-à-d. les études qui remplissaient les critères standard prédéfinis. Nous avons analysé les effets des radars de contrôle routier sur les excès de vitesse, les accidents de la route, les blessures et les décès en comparant la situation avant et après la mise en place des radars, et en analysant la situation sur des routes comparables sans radar au cours de la période d'étude.

Les auteurs ont sélectionné un total de 35 études qui remplissaient les critères prédéfinis. Toutes les études documentant les critères de jugement de la vitesse rapportaient une réduction de la vitesse moyenne après la mise en place des radars de contrôle routier. La vitesse était également rapportée sous forme de réduction du pourcentage de véhicules en excès de vitesse (conducteurs), du pourcentage de réduction du dépassement de plusieurs limites de vitesse, ou de réduction du pourcentage des excès de vitesse situés dans la frange la plus élevée. La réduction du nombre de véhicules (conducteurs) dépassant la limite de vitesse en vigueur indiquée était comprise entre 8 et 70 %, avec une plage de réductions de 10 à 35 % dans la plupart des pays.

Vingt-huit études mesuraient les effets de l'intervention sur les accidents. Les 28 études rapportaient une réduction du nombre d'accidents dans les zones contrôlées par radar après la mise en œuvre du programme. À proximité des zones contrôlées par radar, la réduction était comprise entre 8 et 49 % pour l'ensemble des accidents, avec une plage de réductions de 14 à 25 % dans la plupart des études. Pour les accidents avec dommages corporels, la réduction était comprise entre 8 et 50 %, et entre 11 et 44 % pour les accidents entraînant des décès ou des blessures graves. Les effets sur les zones élargies révélaient des réductions de l'ensemble des accidents comprises entre 9 et 35 %, avec une plage de réductions de 11 à 27 % dans la plupart des études. Pour les accidents entraînant des décès ou des blessures graves, les réductions étaient comprises entre 17 et 58 %, avec une plage de réductions de 30 à 40 % dans la plupart des études. Les études de plus longue durée montraient que ces tendance positives se maintenaient ou s'amélioraient avec le temps.

Dans l'ensemble, les études incluses dans cette revue étaient, au mieux, de qualité moyenne. Néanmoins, la cohérence des réductions de la vitesse et des accidents rapportées dans l'ensemble des études montre que les radars de contrôle routier sont une intervention utile pour réduire le nombre de blessures et de décès liés aux accidents de la route. Pour confirmer ces résultats, des études de meilleure qualité, de préférence sous forme d'essais contrôlés bien planifiés, présentant une durée appropriée (ainsi que de longues périodes de suivi) et un nombre de points-temps de recueil de données suffisant avant et après la mise en place des radars de contrôle routier sont nécessaires. Aucune des études n'avait été réalisée dans des pays à faible revenus, et des recherches dans ces environnements sont également nécessaires. La cohérence des méthodes doit être améliorée, notamment en utilisant des normes internationales pour le recueil et la documentation des données de vitesse et d'accidents, ainsi que des techniques consensuelles pour contrôler le biais des études. Cela permettrait d'obtenir des comparaisons plus fiables entre les différents pays et de fournir des preuves scientifiques solides des effets bénéfiques des radars de contrôle routier.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st April, 2013
Traduction financée par: Pour la France : Minist�re de la Sant�. Pour le Canada : Instituts de recherche en sant� du Canada, minist�re de la Sant� du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche de Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut national d'excellence en sant� et en services sociaux.