Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Routine scale and polish for periodontal health in adults

  1. Helen V Worthington1,*,
  2. Jan E Clarkson1,2,
  3. Gemma Bryan1,
  4. Paul V Beirne3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Oral Health Group

Published Online: 7 NOV 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 15 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004625.pub4


How to Cite

Worthington HV, Clarkson JE, Bryan G, Beirne PV. Routine scale and polish for periodontal health in adults. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 11. Art. No.: CD004625. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004625.pub4.

Author Information

  1. 1

    School of Dentistry, The University of Manchester, Cochrane Oral Health Group, Manchester, UK

  2. 2

    University of Dundee, Dental Health Services Research Unit, Dundee, Scotland, UK

  3. 3

    University College Cork, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Cork, Ireland

*Helen V Worthington, Cochrane Oral Health Group, School of Dentistry, The University of Manchester, Coupland III Building, Oxford Road, Manchester, M13 9PL, UK. helen.worthington@manchester.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (no change to conclusions)
  2. Published Online: 7 NOV 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Many dentists or hygienists provide scaling and polishing for patients at regular intervals, even if those patients are considered to be at low risk of developing periodontal disease. There is debate over the clinical effectiveness and cost effectiveness of 'routine scaling and polishing' and the 'optimal' frequency at which it should be provided for healthy adults.

A 'routine scale and polish' treatment is defined as scaling or polishing or both of the crown and root surfaces of teeth to remove local irritational factors (plaque, calculus, debris and staining), that does not involve periodontal surgery or any form of adjunctive periodontal therapy such as the use of chemotherapeutic agents or root planing.

Objectives

The objectives were: 1) to determine the beneficial and harmful effects of routine scaling and polishing for periodontal health; 2) to determine the beneficial and harmful effects of providing routine scaling and polishing at different time intervals on periodontal health; 3) to compare the effects of routine scaling and polishing with or without oral hygiene instruction (OHI) on periodontal health; and 4) to compare the effects of routine scaling and polishing provided by a dentist or dental care professional (dental therapist or dental hygienist) on periodontal health.

Search methods

We searched the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Oral Health Group's Trials Register (to 15 July 2013), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2013, Issue 6), MEDLINE via OVID (1946 to 15 July 2013) and EMBASE via OVID (1980 to 15 July 2013). We searched the metaRegister of Controlled Trials and the US National Institutes of Health Clinical Trials Register (clinicaltrials.gov) for ongoing and completed studies to July 2013. There were no restrictions regarding language or date of publication.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials of routine scale and polish treatments (excluding split-mouth trials) with and without OHI in healthy dentate adults, without severe periodontitis.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors screened the results of the searches against inclusion criteria, extracted data and assessed risk of bias independently and in duplicate. We calculated mean differences (MDs) (standardised mean differences (SMDs) when different scales were reported) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for continuous data and, where results were meta-analysed, we used a fixed-effect model as there were fewer than four studies. Study authors were contacted where possible and where deemed necessary for missing information.

Main results

Three studies were included in this review with 836 participants included in the analyses. All three studies are assessed as at unclear risk of bias. The numerical results are only presented here for the primary outcome gingivitis. There were no useable data presented in the studies for the outcomes of attachment change and tooth loss. No studies reported any adverse effects.

- Objective 1: Scale and polish versus no scale and polish
Only one trial provided data for the comparison between scale and polish versus no scale and polish. This study was conducted in general practice and compared both six-monthly and 12-monthly scale and polish treatments with no treatment. This study showed no evidence to claim or refute benefit for scale and polish treatments for the outcomes of gingivitis, calculus and plaque. The MD for six-monthly scale and polish, for the percentage of index teeth with bleeding at 24 months was -2% (95% CI -10% to 6%; P value = 0.65), with 40% of the sites in the control group with bleeding. The MD for 12-monthly scale and polish was -1% (95% CI -9% to 7%; P value = 0.82). The body of evidence was assessed as of low quality.

- Objective 2: Scale and polish at different time intervals
Two studies, both at unclear risk of bias, compared routine scale and polish provided at different time intervals. When comparing six with 12 months there was insufficient evidence to determine a difference for gingivitis at 24 months SMD -0.08 (95% CI -0.27 to 0.10). There were some statistically significant differences in favour of scaling and polishing provided at more frequent intervals, in particular between three and 12 months for the outcome of gingivitis at 24 months, with OHI, MD -0.14 (95% CI -0.23 to -0.05; P value = 0.003) and without OHI MD -0.21 (95% CI -0.30 to -0.12; P value < 0.001) (mean per patient measured on 0-3 scale), based on one study. There was some evidence of a reduction in calculus. This body of evidence was assessed as of low quality.

- Objective 3: Scale and polish with and without OHI
One study provided data for the comparison of scale and polish treatment with and without OHI. There was a reduction in gingivitis for the 12-month scale and polish treatment when assessed at 24 months MD -0.14 (95% CI -0.22 to -0.06) in favour of including OHI. There were also significant reductions in plaque for both three and 12-month scale and polish treatments when OHI was included. The body of evidence was once again assessed as of low quality.

- Objective 4: Scale and polish provided by a dentist compared with a dental care professional
No studies were found which compared the effects of routine scaling and polishing provided by a dentist or dental care professional (dental therapist or dental hygienist) on periodontal health.

Authors' conclusions

There is insufficient evidence to determine the effects of routine scale and polish treatments. High quality trials conducted in general dental practice settings with sufficiently long follow-up periods (five years or more) are required to address the objectives of this review.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Routine scale and polish for periodontal health in adults

Review question

Scaling and polishing of the teeth may reduce deposits (plaque and calculus), as well as bleeding and inflammation of the gums (gingivitis). Over time a reduction in gingivitis (a milder form of gum disease) will reduce progression to periodontitis (a severe gum disease).

This review examines the evidence for the effects of routine scale and polish treatment. It has been carried out by authors of the Cochrane Oral Health Group to assess the benefits or otherwise of routine scale and polish treatments for healthy adults; to establish whether different time intervals between treatments influence these; to assess if the treatment is more effective if given together with instruction on how best to maintain healthy gums, and to compare the effectiveness of the treatment when given either by a dentist or by a dental therapist or hygienist.

Background

Many dentists or hygienists provide regular scaling and polishing for most patients at regular intervals even if they are considered to be at low risk of developing gum disease. There is debate about the clinical effectiveness of scaling and polishing and what is the best time interval between treatments.

For the purposes of this review a 'routine scale and polish' is scaling and polishing of both the crown and root surfaces to remove deposits of (mainly) bacteria called plaque, and also hardened plaque known as calculus (tartar). Calculus is so hard it cannot be removed by toothbrushing alone and this along with plaque, other debris and staining on the teeth is removed by the scale and polish treatment. Scaling or removal of hardened deposits is done with specially designed dental instruments or ultrasonic scalers and polishing is done mechanically with special pastes.

In this review scaling above and below the gum level is included, however any surgical procedure on the gums, any chemical washing of the space between gum and tooth (pocket) and more intense (root planing) scraping of the root than simple scaling is excluded.

Study characteristics

The evidence on which this review is based was correct as of 15 July 2013.

Three trials with 836 participants were included in this review, ranging from 61 to 470 in each trial. Participants in two trials were adults aged 18 to 73, in the other trial young air force cadets.

One study included patients attending three general dental practices for check-up appointments. Only patients with calculus or bleeding on probing and pockets between teeth and gums less than 3.5 mm were included. One study included young adult male US Air Force cadets and the other patients attending a dental school hygiene clinic. All participants had varying degrees of gingivitis but no evidence of loss of the bone that the teeth are anchored in (alveolar bone) which is caused by periodontitis.

Key results

The most pertinent result found was from one study which was based in general practice, the most appropriate setting. This study did not show either a benefit or harm for regular six or 12-month scale and polish treatments when compared to no scale and polish. However, the study on young air force cadets compared scale and polish treatments at different time intervals and did find some differences for gingivitis, plaque and calculus when three-month treatments were compared with annual treatments, favouring the three-month treatments. This study also looked at whether the treatment should include both scale and polish and oral hygiene instruction. There were reductions in gingivitis, plaque and calculus. No studies compared dentists with other oral health professionals.

Scaling is an invasive procedure and associated with a number of adverse effects including damaged to tooth surfaces and tooth sensitivity. This information was not captured or reported on by the included studies.

None of the studies included in this review reported on patient-centred outcomes such as quality of life or economic outcomes.

Quality of the evidence

Given the considerable resources involved in providing this treatments for adults in many countries it is disappointing that there is so little good quality, reliable research evidence available to inform clinical practice. The quality of the evidence was generally low, with one of the included studies being more appropriate than the others.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Détartrage et polissage de routine pour la santé parodontale chez l'adulte

Contexte

De nombreux dentistes ou hygiénistes fournissent aux patients un détartrage et un polissage à intervalles réguliers, même si ces patients sont considérés comme présentant un faible risque de développer la maladie parodontale. Un débat est actuellement en cours sur l'efficacité clinique et la rentabilité « du détartrage et du polissage de routine » et la fréquence « optimale »à laquelle il devrait être administré chez les adultes en bonne santé.

Un traitement « de détartrage et de polissage de routine » est défini en tant que détartrage, ou polissage, ou les deux, de la couronne et des surfaces de la racine des dents pour éliminer les facteurs locaux irritants (la plaque dentaire, le tartre, les débris et le jaunissement), qui n'impliquent pas de chirurgie parodontale ou toute forme de thérapie parodontale d'appoint, telle que l'utilisation d'agents chimiothérapeutiques ou de surfaçage radiculaire.

Objectifs

Les objectifs étaient les suivants: 1) déterminer les effets bénéfiques et néfastes du détartrage et du polissage de routine sur la santé parodontale; 2) déterminer les effets bénéfiques et néfastes du détartrage et du polissage de routine à différents temps d’intervalles sur la santé parodontale; 3) comparer les effets du détartrage et du polissage de routine avec ou sans instructions d'hygiène bucco-dentaire sur la santé parodontale; et 4) comparer les effets du détartrage et du polissage de routine fournies par des dentistes ou par des professionnels des soins dentaires (thérapeutes dentaires ou hygiénistes dentaires) sur la santé parodontale.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans les bases de données électroniques suivantes : le registre des essais cliniques du groupe Cochrane sur la santé bucco-dentaire (jusqu' au 15 juillet 2013), CENTRAL ( La Bibliothèque Cochrane 2013, numéro 6), MEDLINE via OVID (de 1946 au 15 juillet 2013) et EMBASE via OVID (de 1980 au 15 juillet 2013). Nous avons effectué des recherches dans Meta le registre des essais contrôlés et le registre des essais des instituts de la santé aux Etats-Unis ( clinicaltrials.gov) pour les études en cours et complétées jusqu' en juillet 2013. Aucune restriction sur la langue ou la date de publication n’a été appliquée.

Critères de sélection

Essais contrôlés randomisés portant sur les traitements de détartrage et de polissage (excluant les essais traitant sur la bouche fendue) avec et sans instructions d'hygiène bucco-dentaire chez les adultes en bonne santé, sans parodontite sévère.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont examiné les résultats des recherches par rapport aux critères d'inclusion, extrait les données et évalué le risque de biais de manière indépendante et en double. Nous avons calculé les différences moyennes (DM) (différences moyennes standardisées (DMS) lorsque différentes échelles étaient rapportées) et des intervalles de confiance (IC) à 95% pour les données continues et, lorsque les résultats ont fait l'objet d'une méta-analyse, nous avons utilisé un modèle à effets fixes car il y avait moins de quatre études. Les auteurs des études ont été contactés lorsque cela était possible et jugé nécessaire pour obtenir des informations manquantes.

Résultats Principaux

Trois études ont été inclues dans cette revue, avec 836 participants inclus dans les analyses. Les trois études sont considérées comme présentant un risque de biais incertain. Les résultats numériques sont seulement présentés pour le critère de jugement principal de la gingivite. Il n'y avait pas de données utilisables présentées dans les études pour les critères de jugement du changement d’attaches et de la perte de dents. Aucune étude ne rapportait d'effets indésirables.

- Premier objectif : détartrage et polissage par rapport à l'absence de détartrage et de polissage
Seul un essai a fourni des données pour la comparaison entre le détartrage et le polissage par rapport à l'absence de détartrage et de polissage. Cette étude a été menée dans la pratique générale et a comparé les traitements de détartrage et de polissage à 6 et 12 mois par rapport à une absence de traitement. Cette étude n’a montré aucune preuve permettant de revendiquer ou d’infirmer un bénéfice pour le traitement de détartrage et de polissage concernant les critères de jugement de la gingivite, du tartre et de la plaque dentaire. La DM pour le détartrage et le polissage à 6 mois, concernant le pourcentage de dents avec des saignements au bout de 24 mois était de -2% (IC à 95%, de -10% à 6%; valeur P =0.65 et 40% des sites dans le groupe témoin avec des saignements. La DM pour le détartrage et le polissage à 12 mois était de -1% (IC à 95% -9% à 7% ; valeur P =0,82). Les preuves étaient de faible qualité.

- Deuxième objectif: détartrage et polissage à différents temps d’intervalles
Deux études, les deux à risque de biais incertain, comparaient le détartrage et le polissage à différents temps d’intervalles. En comparant un intervalle à 6 mois avec un intervalle à 12 mois, il n'y avait pas suffisamment de preuves pour déterminer une différence sur la gingivite au bout de 24 mois, DMS de -0,08 (IC à 95% -0,27 à 0,10). Il y avait certaines différences statistiquement significatives en faveur du détartrage et du polissage fournis à intervalles plus fréquents, en particulier entre 3 et 12 mois pour le critère de jugement de la gingivite à 24 mois, avec instructions d'hygiène bucco-dentaire, DM de -0,14 (IC à 95% de -0,23 à -0,05; valeur P =0,003) et sans instruction d'hygiène bucco-dentaire, DM de -0,21 (IC à 95% de -0,30 à -0,12; valeur P < 0,001) (moyenne par patient mesurée sur une échelle 0-3), ceci basé sur une étude. Certaines preuves montraient une réduction au niveau du tartre. Cet ensemble de preuves était de faible qualité.

- Troisième objectif : détartrage et polissage avec et sans instructions d'hygiène bucco-dentaire
Une étude a fourni des données pour la comparaison de détartrage et de polissage avec et sans instructions d'hygiène bucco-dentaire. Il y avait une réduction de la gingivite lors du détartrage et du polissage tous les 12 mois et évalué au bout de 24 mois, DM de -0,14 (IC à 95% -0,22 à -0,06) en faveur d’instructions d'hygiène bucco-dentaire inclues. Il y avait également une réduction significative de la plaque dentaire pour les traitements de détartrage et de polissage à 3 mois et à 12 mois d’intervalles lorsque les instructions d'hygiène bucco-dentaire étaient inclues. Les preuves étaient encore une fois de faible qualité.

- Quatrième objectif : détartrage et polissage par un dentiste par rapport à un professionnel de soins dentaires
Aucune étude n'a été trouvée qui comparait les effets du détartrage et du polissage de routine par un dentiste par rapport à un professionnel de soins dentaires (thérapeute dentaire ou hygiéniste dentaire) sur la santé parodontale.

Conclusions des auteurs

Il n'existe pas suffisamment de preuves pour déterminer les effets du détartrage et du polissage de routine. Des essais de haute qualité menés dans les établissements en soins dentaires avec des périodes de suivi suffisamment longues (cinq ans ou plus) sont nécessaires pour répondre aux objectifs de cette revue.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Détartrage et polissage de routine pour la santé parodontale chez l'adulte

Détartrage et polissage de routine pour la santé parodontale chez l'adulte

Question de la revue

Le détartrage et le polissage des dents peuvent réduire les dépôts (plaque dentaire et tartre), ainsi que les saignements et l'inflammation des gencives (gingivites). Au fil du temps, une réduction de la gingivite (une forme bénigne de la maladie des gencives) permettra de réduire la progression de la parodontite (grave maladie des gencives).

Cette revue examine les preuves concernant les effets du détartrage et du polissage de routine. Elle a été menée par les auteurs du groupe Cochrane sur la santé bucco-dentaire pour évaluer les bénéfices du détartrage et du polissage de routine chez les adultes en bonne santé, pour établir si les différents intervalles de temps entre les traitements avaient une influence, pour évaluer si le traitement est plus efficace lorsqu’il est administré conjointement avec des instructions pour maintenir des gencives en bonne santé et pour comparer l'efficacité du traitement lorsqu' il est administré par un dentiste, par un thérapeute dentaire ou par un hygiéniste.

Contexte

De nombreux dentistes ou hygiénistes fournissent des détartrages et des polissages de routine chez la plupart des patients à intervalles réguliers, même s'ils sont considérés comme étant à faible risque de développer une maladie des gencives. Un débat subsiste sur l'efficacité clinique des détartrages et des polissages de routine et sur le temps d’intervalle le plus adéquat entre les traitements.

Pour les besoins de cette revue, un détartrage et un polissage de routine sont effectués sur la couronne et les surfaces de la racine pour éliminer les dépôts de bactérie (principalement), connue sous le nom de plaque dentaire, mais aussi de plaque dentaire durcie (tartre). Le tartre est tellement dur qu’il ne peut être retiré par le seul brossage des dents. Il est donc retiré, de même que la plaque dentaire, d'autres débris et tâches sur les dents par un détartrage et un polissage. Le détartrage ou l'élimination des dépôts durcis est effectué avec des instruments dentaires spécifiques ou des détartreurs ultrasoniques et le polissage est réalisé avec des pâtes spéciales.

Dans cette revue, le détartrage au-dessus et en-dessous de la gencive est inclus, mais toute procédure chirurgicale des gencives, tout nettoyage chimique de l'espace entre la gencive et la dent (la poche) et tout détartrage intensifié de la racine (surfaçage radiculaire) autre qu’un simple détartrage, est exclu.

Les caractéristiques de l'étude

Les preuves sur lesquelles se fonde cette revue étaient correctes en date du 15 juillet 2013.

Trois essais comportant 836 participants ont été inclus dans cette revue, allant de 61 à 470 dans chaque essai. Dans deux essais, les participants étaient des adultes âgés de 18 à 73 ans, dans l'autre essai, des jeunes cadets de l’armée de l'air.

Une étude incluait des patients se rendant dans trois cliniques dentaires pour une visite de contrôle. Seuls les patients avec du tartre ou des saignements au sondage et des poches entre les dents et les gencives inférieures à 3.5 mm, ont été inclus. Une étude incluait des jeunes cadets masculins de l’armée de l'air et d’autres patients consultant une clinique d’apprentissage en hygiène dentaire. Tous les participants présentaient divers degrés de gingivite, mais aucune preuve d'une perte de l'os ayant des dents ancrées (os alvéolaire), ce qui est causée par la parodontite.

Résultats principaux

La plupart des résultats pertinents provenait d'une seule étude qui a été réalisée dans une clinique dentaire, établissement le plus approprié. Cette étude n'a pas montré d’effet bénéfique ou préjudiciable lors de détartrage et de polissage tous les 6 ou 12 mois par rapport à l'absence de détartrage et de polissage. Cependant, l'étude sur des jeunes cadets de l’armée de l'air comparait les traitements à différents temps d’intervalles et a trouvé certaines différences au niveau de la gingivite, de la plaque dentaire et du tartre lorsque les traitements tous les trois mois étaient comparés aux traitements annuels, favorisant les traitements de trois mois. Cette étude a également cherché à déterminer si le traitement devrait inclure le détartrage avec des instructions sur l'hygiène bucco-dentaire. Il y avait une réduction de la gingivite, de la plaque dentaire et du tartre. Aucune étude n'a comparé les dentistes avec d'autres professionnels de la santé bucco-dentaire.

Le détartrage est une procédure invasive et est associé à un certain nombre d'effets indésirables, y compris une surface dentaire endommagée et des dents sensibles. Ces informations n'ont pas été identifiées ou rapportées par les études incluses.

Aucune des études incluses dans cette revue n'a rapporté de critère de jugement axé sur le patient tel que la qualité de vie ou les résultats économiques.

Qualité des preuves

Compte tenu du nombre considérable de ressources impliquées dans la divulgation de ces traitements chez les adultes, ceci dans de nombreux pays, il est décevant de constater que les preuves disponibles sont de faible qualité avec des recherches peu fiables pour éclairer la pratique clinique. La qualité des preuves était généralement faible et l'une des études incluses était plus appropriée que les autres.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 14th January, 2014
Traduction financée par: Minist�re Fran�ais des Affaires sociales et de la Sant�, Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux