Consumer-providers of care for adult clients of statutory mental health services

  • Review
  • Intervention

Authors

  • Veronica Pitt,

    1. National Trauma Research Institute, The Alfred Hospital, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Dianne Lowe,

    Corresponding author
    1. Australian Institute for Primary Care & Ageing, La Trobe University, Centre for Health Communication and Participation, Bundoora, VIC, Australia
    • Dianne Lowe, Centre for Health Communication and Participation, Australian Institute for Primary Care & Ageing, La Trobe University, Bundoora, VIC, 3086, Australia. d.lowe@latrobe.edu.au.

    Search for more papers by this author
  • Sophie Hill,

    1. La Trobe University, Centre for Health Communication and Participation, Australian Institute for Primary Care & Ageing, Bundoora, VIC, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Megan Prictor,

    1. Australian Institute for Primary Care & Ageing, La Trobe University, Cochrane Consumers and Communication Review Group, Bundoora, VIC, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Sarah E Hetrick,

    1. University of Melbourne, Orygen Youth Health Research Centre, Centre for Youth Mental Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Rebecca Ryan,

    1. La Trobe University, Centre for Health Communication and Participation, Australian Institute for Primary Care & Ageing, Bundoora, VIC, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Lynda Berends

    1. Turning Point Alcohol & Drug Centre, Fitzroy, VIC, Australia
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Background

In mental health services, the past several decades has seen a slow but steady trend towards employment of past or present consumers of the service to work alongside mental health professionals in providing services. However the effects of this employment on clients (service recipients) and services has remained unclear.

We conducted a systematic review of randomised trials assessing the effects of employing consumers of mental health services as providers of statutory mental health services to clients. In this review this role is called 'consumer-provider' and the term 'statutory mental health services' refers to public services, those required by statute or law, or public services involving statutory duties. The consumer-provider's role can encompass peer support, coaching, advocacy, case management or outreach, crisis worker or assertive community treatment worker, or providing social support programmes.

Objectives

To assess the effects of employing current or past adult consumers of mental health services as providers of statutory mental health services.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library 2012, Issue 3), MEDLINE (OvidSP) (1950 to March 2012), EMBASE (OvidSP) (1988 to March 2012), PsycINFO (OvidSP) (1806 to March 2012), CINAHL (EBSCOhost) (1981 to March 2009), Current Contents (OvidSP) (1993 to March 2012), and reference lists of relevant articles.

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled trials of current or past consumers of mental health services employed as providers ('consumer-providers') in statutory mental health services, comparing either: 1) consumers versus professionals employed to do the same role within a mental health service, or 2) mental health services with and without consumer-providers as an adjunct to the service.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently selected studies and extracted data. We contacted trialists for additional information. We conducted analyses using a random-effects model, pooling studies that measured the same outcome to provide a summary estimate of the effect across studies. We describe findings for each outcome in the text of the review with considerations of the potential impact of bias and the clinical importance of results, with input from a clinical expert.

Main results

We included 11 randomised controlled trials involving 2796 people. The quality of these studies was moderate to low, with most of the studies at unclear risk of bias in terms of random sequence generation and allocation concealment, and high risk of bias for blinded outcome assessment and selective outcome reporting.

Five trials involving 581 people compared consumer-providers to professionals in similar roles within mental health services (case management roles (4 trials), facilitating group therapy (1 trial)). There were no significant differences in client quality of life (mean difference (MD) -0.30, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.80 to 0.20); depression (data not pooled), general mental health symptoms (standardised mean difference (SMD) -0.24, 95% CI -0.52 to 0.05); client satisfaction with treatment (SMD -0.22, 95% CI -0.69 to 0.25), client or professional ratings of client-manager relationship; use of mental health services, hospital admissions and length of stay; or attrition (risk ratio 0.80, 95% CI 0.58 to 1.09) between mental health teams involving consumer-providers or professional staff in similar roles.

There was a small reduction in crisis and emergency service use for clients receiving care involving consumer-providers (SMD -0.34 (95%CI -0.60 to -0.07). Past or present consumers who provided mental health services did so differently than professionals; they spent more time face-to-face with clients, and less time in the office, on the telephone, with clients' friends and family, or at provider agencies.

Six trials involving 2215 people compared mental health services with or without the addition of consumer-providers. There were no significant differences in psychosocial outcomes (quality of life, empowerment, function, social relations), client satisfaction with service provision (SMD 0.76, 95% CI -0.59 to 2.10) and with staff (SMD 0.18, 95% CI -0.43 to 0.79), attendance rates (SMD 0.52 (95% CI -0.07 to 1.11), hospital admissions and length of stay, or attrition (risk ratio 1.29, 95% CI 0.72 to 2.31) between groups with consumer-providers as an adjunct to professional-led care and those receiving usual care from health professionals alone. One study found a small difference favouring the intervention group for both client and staff ratings of clients' needs having been met, although detection bias may have affected the latter. None of the six studies in this comparison reported client mental health outcomes.

No studies in either comparison group reported data on adverse outcomes for clients, or the financial costs of service provision.

Authors' conclusions

Involving consumer-providers in mental health teams results in psychosocial, mental health symptom and service use outcomes for clients that were no better or worse than those achieved by professionals employed in similar roles, particularly for case management services.

There is low quality evidence that involving consumer-providers in mental health teams results in a small reduction in clients' use of crisis or emergency services. The nature of the consumer-providers' involvement differs compared to professionals, as do the resources required to support their involvement. The overall quality of the evidence is moderate to low. There is no evidence of harm associated with involving consumer-providers in mental health teams.

Future randomised controlled trials of consumer-providers in mental health services should minimise bias through the use of adequate randomisation and concealment of allocation, blinding of outcome assessment where possible, the comprehensive reporting of outcome data, and the avoidance of contamination between treatment groups. Researchers should adhere to SPIRIT and CONSORT reporting standards for clinical trials.

Future trials should further evaluate standardised measures of clients' mental health, adverse outcomes for clients, the potential benefits and harms to the consumer-providers themselves (including need to return to treatment), and the financial costs of the intervention. They should utilise consistent, validated measurement tools and include a clear description of the consumer-provider role (eg specific tasks, responsibilities and expected deliverables of the role) and relevant training for the role so that it can be readily implemented. The weight of evidence being strongly based in the United States, future research should be located in diverse settings including in low- and middle-income countries.

Résumé scientifique

Consommateurs - prestataires de soins, destinés à des clients adultes, de services de santé mentale statutaires

Contexte

Dans les services de santé mentale, les dernières décennies ont révélé une tendance lente mais constante vers le recrutement d'anciens consommateurs et de consommateurs actuels d'un service afin qu'il travaille en collaboration avec les professionnels de la santé mentale dans le cadre de la prestation de services. Toutefois, les effets de ce recrutement sur les clients (bénéficiaires des services) et les services restent indéterminés.

Nous avons réalisé une revue systématique d'essais randomisés évaluant les effets liés au recrutement de consommateurs de services de santé mentale en tant que prestataires de services de santé mentale statutaires destinés à des clients. Dans cette revue, ce rôle porte le nom de « consommateur - prestataire » et l'expression « services de santé mentale statutaires » fait référence aux services publics, ceux requis par un règlement juridique ou la loi ou des services publics impliquant des obligations statutaires. Le rôle d'un consommateur - prestataire peut consister à fournir un soutien à ses pairs, donner des conseils, mener des actions de soutien, gérer des cas ou mener des actions de sensibilisation, occuper la fonction d'agent formé aux interventions de crise ou d'agent de traitement communautaire dynamique ou mettre à disposition des programmes de soutien social.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets liés au recrutement d'anciens consommateurs ou de consommateurs actuels de services de santé mentale en tant que prestataires de services de santé mentale statutaires.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library 2012, numéro 3), MEDLINE (OvidSP) (de 1950 à mars 2012), EMBASE (OvidSP) (de 1988 à mars 2012), PsycINFO (OvidSP) (de 1806 à mars 2012), CINAHL (EBSCOhost) (de 1981 à mars 2009), Current Contents (OvidSP) (de 1993 à mars 2012), ainsi que dans les listes bibliographiques des articles pertinents.

Critères de sélection

Des essais contrôlés randomisés concernant d'anciens consommateurs ou des consommateurs actuels de services de santé mentale recrutés en tant que prestataires (« consommateurs - prestataires ») dans des services de santé mentale statutaires, comparant : 1) les consommateurs à des professionnels recrutés pour occuper le même rôle au sein d'un service de santé mentale ou 2) des services de santé mentale avec et sans l'ajout de consommateurs - prestataires au service.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment sélectionné des études et extrait des données. Nous avons contacté les investigateurs afin d'obtenir des informations complémentaires. Nous avons réalisé des analyses en utilisant un modèle à effets aléatoires, en regroupant des études qui évaluaient le même résultat, afin d'évaluer globalement les effets entre les différentes études. Nous avons décrit les éléments obtenus pour chaque résultat dans le texte de la revue en prenant en compte l'éventuel impact des biais et l'importance clinique des résultats, avec l'avis d'un expert clinique.

Résultats principaux

Nous avons inclus 11 essais contrôlés randomisés impliquant 2 796 personnes. La qualité de ces études était modérée à faible, dont la majorité présentait des risques de biais incertains en termes de génération de séquences aléatoires et d'assignation secrète, ainsi que des risques de biais élevés pour l'évaluation des résultats en aveugle et la notification sélective des résultats.

Cinq essais, impliquant 581 personnes, comparaient des consommateurs - prestataires à des professionnels occupant des rôles similaires au sein de services de santé mentale (rôles de gestion des cas (4 essais) et d'amélioration de l'accès à une thérapie de groupe (1 essai)). Il n'y avait aucune différence significative concernant la qualité de vie d'un client (différence moyenne (DM) - 0,30, intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % - 0,80 à 0,20) ; la dépression (données non regroupées), les symptômes généraux de la santé mentale (différence moyenne standardisée (DMS) - 0,24, IC à 95 % - 0,52 à 0,05) ; la satisfaction d'un client vis-à-vis d'un traitement (DMS - 0,22, IC à 95 % - 0,69 à 0,25), les évaluations des clients ou des professionnels de la relation client - responsable ; l'utilisation des services de santé mentale, les hospitalisations et leurs durées ; ou l'attrition (risque relatif 0,80, IC à 95 % 0,58 à 1,09) entre les équipes de santé mentale composées de consommateurs - prestataires ou d'un personnel professionnel occupant des rôles similaires.

Il y avait une légère diminution de l'utilisation des services de crise et d'urgence chez les clients bénéficiant de soins fournis par des consommateurs - prestataires (DMS - 0,34 (IC à 95 % - 0,60 à - 0,07)). Les anciens consommateurs ou les consommateurs actuels, ayant fourni des services de soins de santé mentale de manière radicalement différente par rapport à des professionnels, passaient moins de temps en tête-à-tête avec leurs clients, dans leur cabinet, au téléphone, avec les amis et la famille du client ou dans les agences de prestataires.

Six essais, impliquant 2 215 personnes, comparaient des services de santé mentale avec ou sans l'ajout de consommateurs - prestataires. Il n'y avait aucune différence significative concernant les résultats psychosociaux (qualité de vie, responsabilisation, fonction, relations sociales), la satisfaction d'un client vis-à-vis d'une prestation de service (DMS 0,76, IC à 95 % - 0,59 à 2,10) et du personnel (DMS 0,18, IC à 95 % - 0,43 à 0,79), les taux de fréquentation (DMS 0,52 (IC à 95 % - 0,07 à 1,11), les hospitalisations et leurs durées ou l'attrition (risque relatif 1,29, IC à 95 % 0,72 à 2,31) entre les groupes recevant des soins prodigués par des professionnels avec l'ajout de consommateurs - prestataires et ceux recevant des soins standard uniquement prodigués par des professionnels de santé. Une étude a identifié une différence minime en faveur du groupe expérimental au niveau des évaluations des clients et du personnel concernant la satisfaction des besoins des clients, bien qu'un biais de détection ait faussé ces dernières. Aucune des six études de cette comparaison n'a rapporté des résultats concernant la santé mentale des clients.

Aucune étude dans les groupes témoins n'a rapporté des données concernant des résultats indésirables pour les clients ou les coûts financiers de la prestation d'un service.

Conclusions des auteurs

Le recrutement de consommateurs - prestataires dans les équipes de santé mentale permet d'obtenir des résultats sur les symptômes de santé mentale et psychosociaux, ainsi que sur l'utilisation de ces services pour les clients, qui n'étaient ni meilleurs ni pires que les résultats obtenus par des professionnels occupant des rôles similaires, surtout pour les services de gestion des cas.

Il existe des preuves de qualité médiocre selon lesquelles le recrutement de consommateurs - prestataires au sein d'équipes de santé mentale diminue légèrement le recours aux services de crise et d'urgence par les clients. La nature du recrutement de consommateurs - prestataires diffère par rapport aux professionnels, ainsi que les ressources requises pour prendre en charge leur recrutement. La qualité globale des preuves est modérée à médiocre. Il n'existe aucune preuve d'un danger associé au recrutement de consommateurs - prestataires au sein d'équipes de santé mentale.

De futurs essais contrôlés randomisés concernant des consommateurs - prestataires dans des services de santé mentale devront réduire les biais en utilisant une randomisation et une assignation secrète adéquates, une évaluation des résultats en aveugle, lorsque cela est possible, la notification exhaustive des données de résultats et éviter la contamination entre les groupes de traitement. Les chercheurs devront respecter les recommandations de notification SPIRIT et CONSORT pour les essais cliniques.

Ces futurs essais devront mieux évaluer les mesures standardisées de santé mentale des clients, les résultats indésirables pour les clients, les éventuels effets bénéfiques et les dangers pour les consommateurs - prestataires eux-mêmes (y compris la nécessité de reprendre un traitement) et les coûts financiers d'une intervention. Ils devront utiliser des outils de mesures validés et cohérents et inclure une description claire du rôle de consommateur - prestataire (par ex. : des tâches spécifiques, des responsabilités et les résultats escomptés pour ce rôle), ainsi qu'une formation pertinente à ce rôle afin qu'il puisse être facilement implanté. Les éléments de preuve étant essentiellement basés aux États-Unis, les futures recherches devront se situer dans des lieux autres, notamment dans des pays à revenus faibles et modérés.

Plain language summary

Involving adults who use mental health services as providers of mental health services to others

Past or present consumers of mental health services can work in partnership with mental health professionals in 'consumer-provider' roles, when providing mental health services to others. Their roles may include peer support, coaching, advocacy, specialists or peer interviewers, case management or outreach, crisis worker or assertive community treatment worker, or providing social support programmes. Until now, the effects of employing past or present consumers of mental health services, in providing services to adult clients of these services, have not been assessed rigorously.

We conducted a systematic review, comprehensively searching databases and other materials to identify randomised controlled trials which involved past or present consumers of mental health services employed as providers of mental healthcare services for adult clients. To be included, studies had to make one of two comparisons: 1) consumer-providers versus professionals employed to do the same role within a mental health service, or 2) mental health services with and without consumer-providers as an adjunct to the service.

We found 11 randomised controlled trials involving approximately 2796 people. The quality of the evidence is moderate to low; it was unclear in many cases whether steps were taken to minimise bias, both in the way that participants were allocated to groups, and in how the outcomes were assessed and reported.

Five of the 11 trials involving 581 people compared consumer-providers to professionals who occupied similar roles within mental health services (case management roles (4 trials), and facilitating group therapy (1 trial)). There were no significant differences between the two groups, in terms of client (care recipient) quality of life, mental health symptoms, satisfaction, use of mental health services, or on the numbers of people withdrawing from the study. People receiving care from past or present users of mental health services used crisis and emergency services slightly less than those receiving care from professional staff. Past or present consumers who provided mental health services did so differently than professionals; they spent more time face-to-face with clients, and less time in the office, on the telephone, with clients' friends and family, or at provider agencies.

Six of the 11 trials, involving 2215 people, compared mental health services with or without the addition of consumer-providers. There were no significant differences in quality of life, empowerment, function and social relations, in client satisfaction, attendance rates, hospital use, or in the numbers of people withdrawing from the study, between groups with consumer-providers as an adjunct to professional care and those receiving usual care by health professionals alone. None of these six studies reported on clients' mental health symptoms. None of the studies reported on adverse outcomes (harms) for clients, or on the costs of providing the services.

Overall, we concluded that employing past or present consumers of mental health services as providers of mental health services achieves psychosocial, mental health symptom and service use outcomes that are no better or worse than those achieved by professional staff in providing care.

There is no evidence that the involvement of consumer-providers is harmful. More high-quality and well-reported randomised trials are needed, particularly to evaluate mental health outcomes, adverse outcomes for clients, the potential benefits and harms to the consumer-providers themselves (including a need to return to treatment), and whether it is cost-effective to employ them. Future researchers should include a clear description of the consumer-provider role and relevant training for the role so that it can be readily implemented, and should investigate consumer-providers in settings outside the United States.

Résumé simplifié

Recrutement d'adultes ayant recours à des services de santé mentale en tant que prestataires de services de santé mentale destinés au public

Les anciens consommateurs ou les consommateurs actuels de services de santé mentale peuvent collaborer avec des professionnels de la santé mentale en occupant les rôles de « consommateur - prestataire » lorsqu'ils fournissent des services de santé mentale au public. Leurs rôles peuvent consister à fournir un soutien à leurs pairs, donner des conseils, mener des actions de soutien, servir d'experts ou d'enquêteurs auprès de leurs pairs, gérer des cas ou mener des actions de sensibilisation, occuper la fonction d'agent formé aux interventions de crise ou d'agent de traitement communautaire dynamique ou mettre à disposition des programmes de soutien social. Jusqu'à présent, les effets liés au recrutement d'anciens consommateurs ou de consommateurs actuels de services de santé mentale, concernant la prestation de services aux clients adultes de ces services, n'ont pas été rigoureusement évalués.

Nous avons réalisé une revue systématique, en effectuant des recherches exhaustives dans des bases de données et d'autres documents afin d'identifier des essais contrôlés randomisés qui recrutaient des anciens consommateurs ou des consommateurs actuels de services de santé mentale en tant que prestataires de services de soins de santé mentale destinés aux clients adultes. Pour être incluses, les études devaient effectuer l'une des deux comparaisons suivantes : 1) consommateurs - prestataires et professionnels recrutés pour occuper le même rôle au sein d'un service de santé mentale ou 2) services de santé mentale avec et sans l'ajout de consommateurs - prestataires au service.

Nous avons inclus 11 essais contrôlés randomisés impliquant environ 2 796 personnes. La qualité des preuves est modérée à faible ; dans de nombreux cas, nous ignorions si des mesures étaient prises pour minimiser les biais, de manière à ce que les participants soient alloués à des groupes et que les résultats soient évalués et rapportés.

Cinq des 11 essais, impliquant 581 personnes, comparaient des consommateurs - prestataires à des professionnels occupant des rôles similaires au sein de services de santé mentale (rôles de gestion des cas (4 essais) et d'amélioration de l'accès à une thérapie de groupe (1 essai)). Il n'y avait aucune différence significative entre les deux groupes, en termes de qualité de vie du client (bénéficiaire de soins), de symptômes de la santé mentale, de satisfaction, d'utilisation des services de santé mentale ou au niveau du nombre de personnes arrêtant prématurément l'étude. Les personnes recevant des soins auprès d'anciens utilisateurs ou d'utilisateurs actuels de services de soins mentaux avaient légèrement moins recours aux services de crise et d'urgence que ceux recevant des soins auprès de professionnels. Les anciens consommateurs ou les consommateurs actuels, ayant fourni des services de soins de santé mentale de manière radicalement différente par rapport à des professionnels, passaient moins de temps en tête-à-tête avec leurs clients, dans leur cabinet, au téléphone, avec les amis et la famille du client ou dans les agences de prestataires.

Six des 11 essais, impliquant 2 215 personnes, comparaient des services de santé mentale avec ou sans l'ajout de consommateurs - prestataires. Il n'y avait aucune différence significative au niveau de la qualité de vie, de la responsabilisation, de la fonction, des relations sociales, de la satisfaction du client, des taux de fréquentation, des hospitalisations ou du nombre de personnes arrêtant prématurément l'étude, entre les groupe recevant des soins professionnels avec l'ajout de consommateurs - prestataires et ceux recevant des soins standard auprès de professionnels seuls. Aucune de ces six études ne rendait compte des symptômes de santé mentale des clients. Aucune des études ne rendait compte des résultats indésirables (dangers) pour les clients ou des coûts pour la prestation de ces services.

Dans l'ensemble, nous avons conclu que le recrutement d'anciens consommateurs ou de consommateurs actuels de services de santé mentale, en tant que prestataires de services de santé mentale, permet d'obtenir des résultats sur les symptômes de santé mentale et psychosociaux, ainsi que sur l'utilisation de ces services, qui ne sont ni meilleurs ni pires que les résultats obtenus par un personnel professionnel dans le cadre de la prestation de soins.

Il n'existe aucune preuve selon laquelle le recrutement de consommateurs - prestataires serait préjudiciable. D'autres essais randomisés de qualité élevée et correctement rapportés sont nécessaires, plus particulièrement pour évaluer les résultats sur la santé mentale, les résultats indésirables chez les clients, d'éventuels effets bénéfiques et dangers pour les consommateurs - prestataires eux-mêmes (notamment la nécessité de reprendre un traitement) et si leur recrutement présente un rapport coût-efficacité intéressant. Les futurs chercheurs devront inclure une description claire du rôle de consommateur - prestataire et une formation pertinente à ce rôle, afin que son implémentation se fasse rapidement, et étudier les consommateurs - prestataires dans d'autre pays que les États-Unis.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 22nd March, 2013
Traduction financée par: Instituts de Recherche en Sant� du Canada, Minist�re de la Sant� et des Services Sociaux du Qu�bec, Fonds de recherche du Qu�bec-Sant� et Institut National d'Excellence en Sant� et en Services Sociaux pour la France: Minist�re en charge de la Sant�

Laienverständliche Zusammenfassung

Einbeziehung von erwachsenen Nutzern psychosozialer Dienste als Anbieter psychosozialer Dienste für andere

Personen, die in der Vergangenheit psychosoziale Dienste in Anspruch genommen haben oder aktuell in Anspruch nehmen, können in Zusammenarbeit mit psychosozialen Fachkräften als sogenannte „Nutzer-Anbieter“ psychosoziale Dienstleistungen für andere anbieten. Dabei können sie gegenseitige Unterstützung, Einzelberatung (Coaching), Fürsprache, Befragungen von Experten oder ebenfalls Betroffenen, Fallmanagement oder soziale Beratung und Krisenarbeit übernehmen oder bei der speziellen Behandlungsform „Assertive Community Treatment (ATC)“ unterstützend wirken sowie soziale Betreuungsprogramme anbieten. Bisher wurde nicht gründlich bewertet, wie die Beschäftigung ehemaliger oder aktueller Nutzer psychosozialer Dienste bei der Bereitstellung solcher Dienste für erwachsene Klienten wirkt.

Wir führten einen systematischen Review durch, für den wir umfassend in Datenbanken und anderen Materialien nach randomisierten kontrollierten Studien suchten, in denen ehemalige oder aktuelle Nutzer psychosozialer Dienste als Anbieter solcher Dienste für erwachsene Klienten tätig waren. Um eingeschlossen zu werden, mussten die Studien entweder „Nutzer-Anbieter“ und Fachkräfte mit identischen Rollen in einem psychosozialen Dienst vergleichen oder psychosoziale Dienste mit und ohne zusätzlichen „Nutzer-Anbietern“ miteinander vergleichen.

Wir fanden elf randomisierte kontrollierte Studien mit 2796 Teilnehmern. Die Qualität der Evidenz ist mäßig bis gering; in vielen Fällen war unklar, ob Maßnahmen zur Verminderung von Bias getroffen wurden. Dies bezieht sich sowohl auf die Art und Weise, wie die Teilnehmer bestimmten Gruppen zugeordnet wurden, als auch darauf, wie die Endpunkte bewertet und angegeben wurden.

Fünf der elf Studien (581 Teilnehmer) verglichen „Nutzer-Anbieter“ mit Fachkräften, die in psychosozialen Diensten ähnliche Rollen erfüllten (Fallmanagement [vier Studien] und Moderieren von Gruppentherapien [eine Studie]). Zwischen den beiden Gruppen bestanden keine signifikanten Unterschiede in Hinblick auf Lebensqualität der Klienten (Hilfeempfänger), Symptome der psychischen Gesundheit, Zufriedenheit, Inanspruchnahme von psychosozialen Diensten oder die Anzahl der Teilnehmer, die die Studie vorzeitig beendeten. Studienteilnehmer, die Hilfe von ehemaligen oder aktuellen Nutzern psychosozialer Dienste bekamen, nutzten Krisen- und Notfalldienste etwas weniger als diejenigen, die Hilfe von psychosozialen Fachkräften bekamen. Ehemalige oder aktuelle Nutzer boten psychosoziale Dienste auf andere Weise an als Fachkräfte: Sie verbrachten mehr Zeit im Einzelgespräch mit Klienten und weniger Zeit im Büro, am Telefon, bei Freunden und Familie von Klienten oder in den Dienststellen der Anbieter.

Sechs der 11 Studien (2215 Teilnehmer) verglichen psychosoziale Dienste mit und ohne zusätzliche „Nutzer-Anbieter“. Zwischen den Gruppen mit „Nutzer-Anbietern“ als zusätzlichem Angebot neben der professionellen Betreuung und den Gruppen, die die übliche Betreuung nur durch psychosoziale Fachkräfte erfuhren, gab es keine signifikanten Unterschiede im Hinblick auf Lebensqualität, Stärkung (Empowerment), Funktion, soziale Beziehungen, Klientenzufriedenheit, Anwesenheitsquote, Inanspruchnahme von Krankenhausleistungen oder bei der Anzahl der Teilnehmer, die die Studie vorzeitig beendeten. Keine dieser sechs Studien berichtete über psychische Symptome der Klienten. Ebenso befasste sich keine der Studien mit Endpunkten zu Nebenwirkungen (Schäden) bei den Klienten oder den Bereitstellungskosten dieser Dienste.

Insgesamt stellten wir fest, dass der Einsatz ehemaliger oder aktueller Nutzer psychosozialer Dienste als Anbieter solcher Dienste im Hinblick auf psychosoziale Ergebnisse, Symptome psychischer Gesundheit und Inanspruchnahme der Dienste zu Ergebnissen führt, die weder besser noch schlechter sind als beim Einsatz psychosozialer Fachkräfte.

Es gibt keine Evidenz dafür, dass der Einsatz von „Nutzer-Anbietern“ schädlich ist. Weitere hochwertige und gut dokumentierte Studien sind nötig, insbesondere zur Auswertung der Endpunkte für die psychische Gesundheit, zu Nebenwirkungen bei den Klienten, dem möglichen Nutzen und Schaden für die „Nutzer-Anbieter“ selbst (einschließlich der Notwendigkeit, in die Behandlung zurückzukehren) und zur Wirtschaftlichkeit ihres Einsatzes. In zukünftigen Arbeiten sollte sich eine klare Beschreibung der Rolle der „Nutzer-Anbieter“ sowie der relevanten Ausbildung für diese Rolle finden, damit diese ohne Schwierigkeiten umgesetzt werden kann. Ebenso sollte der Einsatz von „Nutzer-Anbietern“ außerhalb der USA untersucht werden.

Anmerkungen zur Übersetzung

S. Schmidt-Wussow. Koordination durch Cochrane Schweiz