Intervention Review

Probiotics for the prevention of pediatric antibiotic-associated diarrhea

  1. Bradley C Johnston1,*,
  2. Joshua Z Goldenberg2,
  3. Per O Vandvik3,
  4. Xin Sun1,
  5. Gordon H Guyatt1

Editorial Group: Cochrane Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Functional Bowel Disorders Group

Published Online: 9 NOV 2011

Assessed as up-to-date: 24 MAY 2010

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004827.pub3


How to Cite

Johnston BC, Goldenberg JZ, Vandvik PO, Sun X, Guyatt GH. Probiotics for the prevention of pediatric antibiotic-associated diarrhea. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 11. Art. No.: CD004827. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004827.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    McMaster University, Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada

  2. 2

    Bastyr University, Seattle, WA, USA

  3. 3

    Norwegian Knowledge Centre for the Health Services, Oslo, Norway

*Bradley C Johnston, Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, McMaster University, 1200 Main Street West, 2C12, Hamilton, Ontario, L8N 3Z5, Canada. bradley.johnston@sickkids.ca. bjohnst@mcmaster.ca.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New search for studies and content updated (conclusions changed)
  2. Published Online: 9 NOV 2011

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Antibiotics alter the microbial balance within the gastrointestinal tract. Probiotics may prevent antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) via restoration of the gut microflora. Antibiotics are prescribed frequently in children and AAD is common in this population.

Objectives

The primary objectives were to assess the efficacy and safety of probiotics (any specified strain or dose) used for the prevention of AAD in children.

Search methods

MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, CINAHL, AMED, and the Web of Science (inception to May 2010) were searched along with specialized registers including the Cochrane IBD/FBD review group, CISCOM (Centralized Information Service for Complementary Medicine), NHS Evidence, the International Bibliographic Information on Dietary Supplements as well as trial registries. Letters were sent to authors of included trials, nutra/pharmaceutical companies, and experts in the field requesting additional information on ongoing or unpublished trials. Conference proceedings, dissertation abstracts, and reference lists from included and relevant articles were also searched.

Selection criteria

Randomized, parallel, controlled trials in children (0 to 18 years) receiving antibiotics, that compare probiotics to placebo, active alternative prophylaxis, or no treatment and measure the incidence of diarrhea secondary to antibiotic use were considered for inclusion.

Data collection and analysis

Study selection, data extraction as well as methodological quality assessment using the risk of bias instrument was conducted independently and in duplicate by two authors. Dichotomous data (incidence of diarrhea, adverse events) were combined using a pooled relative risk and risk difference (adverse events), and continuous data (mean duration of diarrhea, mean daily stool frequency) as weighted mean differences, along with their corresponding 95% confidence intervals. For overall pooled results on the incidence of diarrhea, sensitivity analyses included available case versus extreme-plausible analyses and random- versus fixed-effect models. To explore possible explanations for heterogeneity, a priori subgroup analysis were conducted on probiotic strain, dose, definition of antibiotic-associated diarrhea, antibiotic agent as well as risk of bias.

Main results

Sixteen studies (3432 participants) met the inclusion criteria. Trials included treatment with either Bacillus spp., Bifidobacterium spp., Lactobacilli spp., Lactococcus spp., Leuconostoc cremoris, Saccharomyces spp., or Streptococcus spp., alone or in combination. Nine studies used a single strain probiotic agent, four combined two probiotic strains, one combined three probiotic strains, one product included ten probiotic agents, and one study included two probiotic arms that used three and two strains respectively. The risk of bias was determined to be high in 8 studies and low in 8 studies. Available case (patients who did not complete the studies were not included in the analysis) results from 15/16 trials reporting on the incidence of diarrhea show a large, precise benefit from probiotics compared to active, placebo or no treatment control. The incidence of AAD in the probiotic group was 9% compared to 18% in the control group (2874 participants; RR 0.52; 95% CI 0.38 to 0.72; I2 = 56%). This benefit was not statistically significant in an extreme plausible (60% of children loss to follow-up in probiotic group and 20% loss to follow-up in the control group had diarrhea) intention to treat (ITT) sensitivity analysis. The incidence of AAD in the probiotic group was 16% compared to 18% in the control group (3392 participants; RR 0.81; 95% CI 0.63 to 1.04; I2 = 59%). An a priori available case subgroup analysis exploring heterogeneity indicated that high dose (≥5 billion CFUs/day) is more effective than low probiotic dose (< 5 billion CFUs/day), interaction P value = 0.010. For the high dose studies the incidence of AAD in the probiotic group was 8% compared to 22% in the control group (1474 participants; RR 0.40; 95% CI 0.29 to 0.55). For the low dose studies the incidence of AAD in the probiotic group was 8% compared to 11% in the control group (1382 participants; RR 0.80; 95% CI 0.53 to 1.21). An extreme plausible ITT subgroup analysis was marginally significant for high dose probiotics. For the high dose studies the incidence of AAD in the probiotic group was 17% compared to 22% in the control group (1776 participants; RR 0.72; 95% CI 0.53 to 0.99; I2 = 58%). None of the 11 trials (n = 1583) that reported on adverse events documented any serious adverse events. Meta-analysis excluded all but an extremely small non-significant difference in adverse events between treatment and control (RD 0.00; 95% CI -0.01 to 0.02).

Authors' conclusions

Despite heterogeneity in probiotic strain, dose, and duration, as well as in study quality, the overall evidence suggests a protective effect of probiotics in preventing AAD. Using 11 criteria to evaluate the credibility of the subgroup analysis on probiotic dose, the results indicate that the subgroup effect based on dose (≥5 billion CFU/day) was credible. Based on high-dose probiotics, the number needed to treat (NNT) to prevent one case of diarrhea is seven (NNT 7; 95% CI 6 to 10). However, a GRADE analysis indicated that the overall quality of the evidence for the primary endpoint (incidence of diarrhea) was low due to issues with risk of bias (due to high loss to follow-up) and imprecision (sparse data, 225 events). The benefit for high dose probiotics (Lactobacillus rhamnosus or Saccharomyces boulardii) needs to be confirmed by a large well-designed randomized trial. More refined trials are also needed that test strain specific probiotics and evaluate the efficacy (e.g. incidence and duration of diarrhea) and safety of probiotics with limited losses to follow-up. It is premature to draw conclusions about the efficacy and safety of other probiotic agents for pediatric AAD. Future trials would benefit from a standard and valid outcomes to measure AAD.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Probiotics for the prevention of pediatric antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD)

Antibiotic-associated diarrhea (AAD) occurs when antibiotics disturb the natural balance of "good" and "bad" bacteria in the intestinal tract causing harmful bacteria to multiply beyond their normal numbers. The symptoms of AAD include frequent watery bowel movements and crampy abdominal pain. Probiotics are found in dietary supplements or yogurts and contain potentially beneficial bacteria or yeast. Probiotics may restore the natural balance of bacteria in the intestinal tract. Sixteen studies were reviewed and provide the best available evidence. The studies tested 3432 children (2 weeks to 17 years of age) who were receiving probiotics co-administered with antibiotics to prevent AAD. The participants received probiotics (Lactobacilli spp., Bifidobacterium spp., Streptococcus spp., or Saccharomyces boulardii alone or in combination), placebo (pills not including probiotics), other treatments thought to prevent AAD (i.e. diosmectite or infant formula) or no treatment. The studies were short-term, ranging in length from 10 days to 3 months. Analyses showed that probiotics may be effective for preventing AAD. Probiotics were generally well tolerated, and minor side effects occurred infrequently, with no significant difference between probiotic and control groups. Side effects reported in the studies include rash, nausea, gas, flatulence, vomiting, increased phlegm, chest pain, constipation, taste disturbance, and low appetite. The current data suggest that Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Saccharomyces boulardii at a high dosage of 5 to 40 billion CFU/day may prevent the onset of ADD, with no serious side effects documented in otherwise healthy children. This benefit for high dose probiotics needs to be confirmed by a large well designed randomized study. No conclusions about the effectiveness and safety of other probiotic agents for pediatric AAD can be drawn. More refined studies are also needed that evaluate strain specific probiotics and report both the effectiveness (e.g. incidence and duration of diarrhea) and safety of probiotics.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Probiotics for the prevention of pediatric antibiotic-associated diarrhea

Contexte

Les antibiotiques modifient l'équilibre microbien dans le système gastro-intestinal. Les probiotiques peuvent prévenir la diarrhée associée aux antibiotiques (DAA) en restaurant la flore intestinale. Les antibiotiques sont prescrits fréquemment chez l'enfant et la DAA est courante dans cette population.

Objectifs

Les objectifs principaux étaient d'évaluer l'efficacité et la sécurité des probiotiques (toutes souches ou posologies) utilisés pour la prévention de la DAA chez l'enfant.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Une recherche a été effectuée dans MEDLINE, EMBASE, CENTRAL, CINAHL, AMED, et le Web of Science (de son origine à mai 2010), dans des registres spécialisés, notamment le groupe de revue Cochrane IBD/FBD, CISCOM (Centralized Information Service for Complementary Medicine), NHS Evidence, l'International Bibliographic Information on Dietary Supplements, ainsi que dans les registres d'essais. Des lettres ont été envoyées aux auteurs des essais inclus, à des sociétés nutri-pharmaceutiques et à des experts du domaine en demandant des informations supplémentaires sur les essais en cours ou non publiés. Une recherche a également été effectuée dans les résumés de conférence, les résumés de thèses et les références bibliographiques des articles inclus et pertinents.

Critères de sélection

Les essais contrôlés, randomisés, en parallèle, chez des enfants (de 0 à 18 ans) recevant des antibiotiques, qui comparent les probiotiques à un placebo, une prophylaxie active alternative ou une absence de traitement et mesurent l'incidence de la diarrhée après une utilisation d'antibiotiques ont été pris en compte pour l'inclusion.

Recueil et analyse des données

La sélection des études, l'extraction des données, ainsi que l'évaluation de la qualité méthodologique au moyen de l'instrument de risque de biais, ont été effectuées de manière indépendante et en double par deux auteurs. Les données dichotomiques (incidence de la diarrhée, événements indésirables) ont été combinées en utilisant un risque relatif combiné et une différence de risques (événements indésirables), et les données continues (durée moyenne de la diarrhée, fréquence quotidienne moyenne des selles) ont été combinées sous la forme de différences moyennes pondérées, avec leurs intervalles de confiance de 95% correspondants. Pour les résultats combinés globaux sur l'incidence de la diarrhée, les analyses de sensibilité incluaient des analyses des cas disponibles comparées à des analyses de cas extrêmes plausibles et les modèles à effets aléatoires versus effets fixes. Pour explorer les explications possibles de l'hétérogénéité, une analyse en sous-groupe définie a priori a été menée sur la souche des probiotiques, la posologie, la définition de la diarrhée associée aux antibiotiques, l'agent antibiotique, ainsi que le risque de biais.

Résultats Principaux

Seize études (3432 participants) remplissaient les critères d'inclusion. Les essais incluaient un traitement avec soit Bacillus spp., Bifidobacterium spp., Lactobacilli spp., Lactococcus spp., Leuconostoc cremoris, Saccharomyces spp., ou Streptococcus spp., seuls ou en combinaison. Neuf études utilisaient un agent probiotique monosouche, quatre combinaient deux souches probiotiques, une combinait trois souches probiotiques, un produit comprenait dix agents probiotiques, et une étude incluait deux bras probiotiques qui utilisaient trois souches et deux souches, respectivement. Il a été déterminé que le risque de biais était élevé dans 8 études et faible dans 8 études. Les résultats des cas disponibles (les patients n'ayant pas achevé les études n'ont pas été inclus dans l'analyse) issus de 15/16 essais notifiant l'incidence de la diarrhée montrent un bénéfice important et précis des probiotiques comparé à un traitement actif, un placebo ou une absence de traitement. L'incidence de la DAA dans le groupe avec probiotiques était de 9% comparé à 18% dans le groupe témoin (2874 participants ; RR 0,52 ; IC à 95% 0,38 à 0,72 ; I2 = 56%). Ce bénéfice n'était pas statistiquement significatif dans une analyse de sensibilité en intention de traiter (ITT) des extrêmes plausibles (60% des enfants perdus de vue dans le groupe des probiotiques et 20% des enfants perdus de vue dans le groupe témoin présentaient une diarrhée). L'incidence de la DAA dans le groupe avec probiotiques était de 16% comparé à 18% dans le groupe témoin (3392 participants ; RR 0,81 ; IC à 95% 0,63 à 1,04 ; I2 = 59%). Une analyse en sous-groupe définie a priori des cas disponibles, explorant l'hétérogénéité, a indiqué qu'une dose élevée de probiotiques (≥5 milliards d'UFC/jour) était plus efficace qu'une dose faible (< 5 milliards d'UFC/jour), P-valeur de l'interaction = 0,010. Pour les études à dose élevée, l'incidence de la DAA dans le groupe avec probiotiques était de 8% comparé à 22% dans le groupe témoin (1474 participants ; RR 0,40 ; IC à 95% 0,29 à 0,55). Pour les études à dose faible, l'incidence de la DAA dans le groupe avec probiotiques était de 8% comparé à 11% dans le groupe témoin (1382 participants ; RR 0,80 ; IC à 95% 0,53 à 1,21). Une analyse en sous-groupe en ITT des extrêmes plausibles était marginalement significative pour les probiotiques à dose élevée. Pour les études à dose élevée, l'incidence de la DAA dans le groupe avec probiotiques était de 17% comparé à 22% dans le groupe témoin (1776 participants ; RR 0,72 ; IC à 95% 0,53 à 0,99 ; I2 = 58%). Aucun des 11 essais (n = 1583) reportant les événements indésirables n'a documenté d'événements indésirables graves. La méta-analyse a exclu toutes les différences hormis une différence non significative extrêmement faible en termes d'événements indésirables entre le traitement et le témoin (DR 0,00 ; IC à 95% -0,01 à 0,02).

Conclusions des auteurs

Malgré l'hétérogénéité au niveau des souches, des posologies et des durées de probiotiques, ainsi que de la qualité des études, les preuves globales suggèrent un effet protecteur des probiotiques dans la prévention de la DAA. En utilisant 1 1 critères pour évaluer la crédibilité de l'analyse en sous-groupe de la dose de probiotiques, les résultats indiquent que l'effet de sous-groupe basé sur la dose (≥5 milliards d'UFC/jour) était crédible. Sur la base de probiotiques à dose élevée, le nombre de sujets à traiter (NST) pour empêcher un cas de diarrhée est de sept (NST 7 ; IC à 95% 6 à 10). Cependant, une analyse selon l’approche GRADE indiquait que la qualité globale des preuves pour le critère de jugement principal (incidence de la diarrhée) était faible en raison de problèmes liés au risque de biais (en raison de nombreux perdus de vue) et à l'imprécision (données rares, 225 événements). Le bénéfice pour les probiotiques à dose élevée (Lactobacillus rhamnosus or Saccharomyces boulardii) doit être confirmé par un essai randomisé, bien conçu, à grande échelle. Des essais plus affinés doivent également être menés pour tester les probiotiques issus de souches spécifiques et évaluer l'efficacité (par ex. l'incidence et la durée de la diarrhée) et la sécurité des probiotiques avec un nombre limité de perdus de vue. Il est prématuré de tirer des conclusions concernant l'efficacité et la sécurité d'autres agents probiotiques pour la DAA pédiatrique. Il serait bénéfique, pour les essais à venir, de disposer d'une norme et de critères valides pour mesurer la DAA.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Probiotics for the prevention of pediatric antibiotic-associated diarrhea

Probiotiques pour la prévention de la diarrhée associée aux antibiotiques (DAA) en pédiatrie

La diarrhée associée aux antibiotiques (DAA) survient lorsque les antibiotiques perturbent l'équilibre naturel des « bonnes » et des « mauvaises » bactéries dans le système intestinal, provoquant la multiplication des bactéries dangereuses au-delà de leur nombre normal. Les symptômes de la DAA comprennent des selles liquides fréquentes et des crampes abdominales douloureuses. On trouve les probiotiques dans les compléments alimentaires ou les yaourts. Ils contiennent des bactéries ou des levures potentiellement bénéfiques. Les probiotiques peuvent restaurer l'équilibre naturel des bactéries dans le système intestinal. Seize études ont été examinées et fournissent les meilleures preuves disponibles. Les études testaient 3432 enfants (de 2 semaines à 17 ans) qui recevaient des probiotiques administrés de manière concomitante avec des antibiotiques pour prévenir une DAA. Les participants recevaient des probiotiques (Lactobacilli spp., Bifidobacterium spp., Streptococcus spp., ou Saccharomyces boulardii seuls ou en combinaison), placebo (pilules ne contenant pas de probiotiques), d'autres traitements prévenant la DAA (à savoir la diosmectite ou une préparation pour nourrissons) ou ne recevaient aucun traitement. Les études étaient de courtes durées, allant de 10 jours à 3 mois. Les analyses montraient que les probiotiques pouvaient être efficaces pour prévenir la DAA. Les probiotiques étaient généralement bien tolérés et les effets secondaires mineurs étaient rares, sans différence significative entre les groupes avec probiotiques et les groupes témoins. Les effets secondaires notifiés dans les études étaient des éruptions, des nausées, des gaz, des flatulences, des vomissements, un flegme accru, des douleurs thoraciques, une constipation, une altération du goût et une perte d'appétit. Les données actuelles suggèrent que Lactobacillus rhamnosus et Saccharomyces boulardii à une forte dose de 5 à 40 milliards d'UFC/jour peuvent prévenir l'apparition de la DAA, sans effets secondaires graves documentés chez des enfants par ailleurs sains. Ce bénéfice pour les probiotiques à forte dose doit être confirmé par une étude randomisée, bien conçue, à large échelle. Aucune conclusion ne peut être tirée quant à l'efficacité et à la sécurité d'autres agents probiotiques pour la DAA pédiatrique. Des études plus affinées doivent également être menées pour évaluer les probiotiques issus de souches spécifiques et reportant à la fois l'efficacité (par ex. l'incidence et la durée de la diarrhée) et la sécurité des probiotiques.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st December, 2011
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français