Intervention Review

Interventions to slow progression of myopia in children

  1. Jeffrey J Walline1,*,
  2. Kristina Lindsley2,
  3. Satyanarayana S Vedula2,
  4. Susan A Cotter3,
  5. Donald O Mutti1,
  6. J. Daniel Twelker4

Editorial Group: Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group

Published Online: 7 DEC 2011

Assessed as up-to-date: 11 OCT 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004916.pub3

How to Cite

Walline JJ, Lindsley K, Vedula SS, Cotter SA, Mutti DO, Twelker JD. Interventions to slow progression of myopia in children. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 12. Art. No.: CD004916. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004916.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    The Ohio State University, College of Optometry, Columbus, Ohio, USA

  2. 2

    Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Center for Clinical Trials, Department of Epidemiology, Baltimore, Maryland, USA

  3. 3

    Southern California College of Optometry, Fullerton, California, USA

  4. 4

    University of Arizona, Department of Ophthalmology, Tucson, Arizona, USA

*Jeffrey J Walline, College of Optometry, The Ohio State University, 338 West Tenth Avenue, Columbus, Ohio, 43210-1240, USA. walline.1@osu.edu.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 7 DEC 2011

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Resumen en términos sencillos
  6. Résumé
  7. Résumé simplifié

Background

Nearsightedness (myopia) causes blurry vision when looking at distant objects. Highly nearsighted people are at greater risk of several vision-threatening problems such as retinal detachments, choroidal atrophy, cataracts and glaucoma. Interventions that have been explored to slow the progression of myopia include bifocal spectacles, cycloplegic drops, intraocular pressure-lowering drugs, muscarinic receptor antagonists and contact lenses. The purpose of this review was to systematically assess the effectiveness of strategies to control progression of myopia in children.

Objectives

To assess the effects of several types of interventions, including eye drops, undercorrection of nearsightedness, multifocal spectacles and contact lenses, on the progression of nearsightedness in myopic children younger than 18 years. We compared the interventions of interest with each other, to single vision lenses (SVLs) (spectacles), placebo or no treatment.

Search methods

We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 10), MEDLINE (January 1950 to October 2011), EMBASE (January 1980 to October 2011), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to October 2011), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com) and ClinicalTrials.gov (http://clinicaltrials.gov). There were no date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. The electronic databases were last searched on 11 October 2011. We also searched the reference lists and Science Citation Index for additional, potentially relevant studies.

Selection criteria

We included randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in which participants were treated with spectacles, contact lenses or pharmaceutical agents for the purpose of controlling progression of myopia. We excluded trials where participants were older than 18 years at baseline or participants had less than -0.25 diopters (D) spherical equivalent myopia.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the risk of bias for each included study. When possible, we analyzed data with the inverse variance method using a fixed-effect or random-effects model, depending on the number of studies and amount of heterogeneity detected.

Main results

We included 23 studies (4696 total participants) in this review, with 17 of these studies included in quantitative analysis. Since we only included RCTs in the review, the studies were generally at low risk of bias for selection bias. Undercorrection of myopia was found to increase myopia progression slightly in two studies; children who were undercorrected progressed on average 0.15 D (95% confidence interval (CI) -0.29 to 0.00) more than the fully corrected SVLs wearers at one year. Rigid gas permeable contact lenses (RGPCLs) were found to have no evidence of effect on myopic eye growth in two studies (no meta-analysis due to heterogeneity between studies). Progressive addition lenses (PALs), reported in four studies, and bifocal spectacles, reported in four studies, were found to yield a small slowing of myopia progression. For seven studies with quantitative data at one year, children wearing multifocal lenses, either PALs or bifocals, progressed on average 0.16 D (95% CI 0.07 to 0.25) less than children wearing SVLs. The largest positive effects for slowing myopia progression were exhibited by anti-muscarinic medications. At one year, children receiving pirenzepine gel (two studies), cyclopentolate eye drops (one study), or atropine eye drops (two studies) showed significantly less myopic progression compared with children receiving placebo (mean differences (MD) 0.31 (95% CI 0.17 to 0.44), 0.34 (95% CI 0.08 to 0.60), and 0.80 (95% CI 0.70 to 0.90), respectively).

Authors' conclusions

The most likely effective treatment to slow myopia progression thus far is anti-muscarinic topical medication. However, side effects of these medications include light sensitivity and near blur. Also, they are not yet commercially available, so their use is limited and not practical. Further information is required for other methods of myopia control, such as the use of corneal reshaping contact lenses or bifocal soft contact lenses (BSCLs) with a distance center are promising, but currently no published randomized clinical trials exist.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Resumen en términos sencillos
  6. Résumé
  7. Résumé simplifié

Interventions to slow progression of nearsightedness in children

Nearsightedness (myopia) causes blurry vision when looking at distant objects. Approximately 33% of the population in the United States is nearsighted, and some Asian countries report that up to 80% of children are nearsighted. Several studies have examined a variety of methods (including eye drops, incomplete correction (known as 'undercorrection') of nearsightedness, multifocal lenses and contact lenses) to slow the worsening of nearsightedness.

In this review we included 23 clinical investigations of myopia treatments in children. Two studies investigated undercorrection of myopia; twelve studies investigated multifocal spectacles (progressive addition lenses (PALs) or bifocal spectacles); one study investigated bifocal soft contact lenses (BSCLs); one study investigated novel lenses designed to reduce peripheral hyperopic defocus (peripheral vision farsightedness) (i.e. lenses that help to focus peripheral vision as well as central vision); two studies investigated rigid gas permeable contact lenses (RGPCLs); and six studies investigated pharmaceutical eye drops (five of these studies were of anti-muscarinic medications). There was one study that evaluated both multifocal lenses and pharmaceutical eye drops. In all studies the interventions of interest were compared with each other, single vision lenses (SVLs) (spectacles), single vision soft contact lenses (SVSCLs) or placebo. The follow-up period was at least one year for all studies.

The largest positive effects for slowing myopia progression were exhibited by anti-muscarinic medications (eye drops), but they either cause light sensitivity or blurred near vision, and are not yet available for use. Multifocal spectacles including PALs and bifocal spectacles were found to yield a small slowing of myopia progression. Undercorrection of myopia was found to increase myopia progression slightly, while RGPCLs were found to have no evidence of effect on myopic eye growth.

 

Resumen

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Resumen en términos sencillos
  6. Résumé
  7. Résumé simplifié

Intervenciones para desacelerar la progresión de la miopía en niños

Antecedentes

La miopía causa visión borrosa cuando se miran objetos a distancia. Los pacientes muy miopes tienen mayor riesgo de presentar varios problemas que amenazan la visión como los desprendimientos de retina, la atrofia coroidea, las cataratas y el glaucoma. Las intervenciones que se han explorado para desacelerar la progresión de la miopía incluyen anteojos bifocales, gotas ciclopléjicas, fármacos para disminuir la presión intraocular, antagonistas de los receptores muscarínicos y lentes de contacto. El objetivo de esta revisión fue evaluar sistemáticamente la efectividad de las estrategias para controlar la progresión de la miopía en niños.

Objetivos

Evaluar los efectos de varios tipos de intervenciones, incluidas las gotas oculares, la hipocorrección de la miopía, los anteojos multifocales y las lentes de contacto, sobre la progresión de la miopía en niños con miopía menores de 18 años. Las intervenciones de interés se compararon entre sí, con las lentes de visión única (LVU) (anteojos), placebo o ningún tratamiento.

Métodos de búsqueda

Se realizaron búsquedas en CENTRAL (que contiene el Registro de Ensayos del Grupo Cochrane de Trastornos de los Ojos y la Visión [Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group]) (The Cochrane Library 2011, número 10), MEDLINE (enero 1950 hasta octubre 2011), EMBASE (enero 1980 hasta octubre 2011), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (enero 1982 hasta octubre 2011), en el metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com) y en ClinicalTrials.gov (http://clinicaltrials.gov).www.controlled-trials.com) y ClinicalTrials.gov (http://clinicaltrials.gov). No hubo restricciones de idioma o de fecha en las búsquedas electrónicas de ensayos. Las búsquedas en las bases de datos electrónicas se realizaron por última vez el 11 de Octubre de 2011. También se hicieron búsquedas de estudios adicionales potencialmente relevantes en las listas de referencias y en el Science Citation Index.

Criterios de selección

Se incluyeron ensayos controlados aleatorios (ECA) en los que los participantes fueron tratados con anteojos, lentes de contacto o agentes farmacológicos con el objetivo de controlar la progresión de la miopía. Se excluyeron los ensayos donde los participantes fueron mayores de 18 años al inicio o donde los participantes tenían una miopía con equivalente esférico menor de -0,25 dioptrías (D).

Obtención y análisis de los datos

Dos revisores, de forma independiente, extrajeron los datos y evaluaron el riesgo de sesgo para cada estudio incluido. De ser posible, los datos se analizaron con el método de la varianza inversa y se utilizó un modelo de efectos fijos o de efectos aleatorios, según el número de estudios y la cantidad de heterogeneidad detectada.

Resultados principales

En esta revisión se incluyeron 23 estudios (4696 participantes), y 17 de estos estudios se incluyeron en el análisis cuantitativo. Como solo se incluyeron ECA en la revisión, los estudios tuvieron en general bajo riesgo de sesgo de selección. Se encontró que la hipocorrección de la miopía aumentó ligeramente la progresión de la miopía en dos estudios; los niños que recibieron hipocorrección progresaron como promedio al año 0,15 D (intervalo de confianza [IC] del 95%: -0,29 a 0,00) más que los pacientes que utilizaron LVU completamente corregidas. En dos estudios no hubo pruebas de un efecto de las lentes de contacto rígidas permeables al gas (LCRPG) sobre el crecimiento del ojo miope (no se realizó un metanálisis debido a la heterogeneidad entre los estudios). Se encontró que las lentes progresivas (LP) (analizadas en cuatro estudios) y los anteojos bifocales (analizados en cuatro estudios) produjeron una pequeña desaceleración en la progresión de la miopía. En siete estudios con datos cuantitativos al año, los niños que utilizaron lentes multifocales (LP o bifocales) progresaron como promedio 0,16 D (IC del 95%: 0,07 a 0,25) menos que los niños que utilizaron LVU. Los fármacos antimuscarínicos presentaron los mayores efectos positivos para la desaceleración de la progresión de la miopía. Al año, los niños que recibieron gel de pirenzepina (dos estudios), gotas oculares de ciclopentolato (un estudio) o gotas oculares de atropina (dos estudios) mostraron significativamente menos progresión de la miopía en comparación con los niños que recibieron placebo (diferencias de medias [DM] 0,31 [IC del 95%: 0,17 a 0,44]; 0,34 [IC del 95%: 0,08 a 0,60] y 0,80 [IC del 95%: 0,70 a 0,90], respectivamente).

Conclusiones de los autores

Hasta el momento el tratamiento probablemente más eficaz para desacelerar la progresión de la miopía es la medicación antimuscarínica tópica. Sin embargo, los efectos secundarios de estos fármacos incluyen sensibilidad a la luz y visión cercana borrosa. Además, todavía no están comercialmente disponibles, por lo que su uso es limitado y no es práctico. Se necesita información adicional de otros métodos de control de la miopía, ya que las lentes de contacto de reconfiguración corneal o las lentes de contacto blandas bifocales (LCBB) con un centro de distancia son alentadoras, pero actualmente no existen ensayos clínicos aleatorios publicados.

 

Resumen en términos sencillos

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Resumen en términos sencillos
  6. Résumé
  7. Résumé simplifié

Intervenciones para desacelerar la progresión de la miopía en niños

Intervenciones para desacelerar la progresión de la miopía en los niños

La miopía causa visión borrosa cuando se miran objetos a distancia. Aproximadamente el 33% de la población de los Estados Unidos es miope, y algunos países asiáticos informan que hasta el 80% de los niños son miopes. Varios estudios han examinado una variedad de métodos (que incluyen las gotas oculares, la corrección incompleta de la miopía [conocida como "hipocorrección"]), las lentes multifocales y las lentes de contacto) para desacelerar el empeoramiento de la miopía.

En esta revisión se incluyeron 23 investigaciones clínicas de tratamientos de miopía en niños. Dos estudios investigaron la hipocorrección de la miopía; 12 estudios investigaron los anteojos multifocales (las lentes progresivas [LP] o los anteojos bifocales); un estudio investigó las lentes de contacto blandas bifocales (LCBB); un estudio investigó las lentes nuevas diseñadas para reducir el desenfoque hipermétrope periférico (hipermetropía de visión periférica) (es decir lentes que ayudan a centrar la visión periférica así como la visión central); dos estudios investigaron las lentes de contacto rígidas permeables al gas (LCRPG); y seis estudios investigaron las gotas oculares farmacológicas (cinco de estos estudios fueron de fármacos antimuscarínicos). Un estudio evaluó las lentes multifocales y las gotas oculares farmacológicas. En todos los estudios las intervenciones de interés se compararon entre sí, con lentes de visión única (LVU) (anteojos), con lentes de contacto blandas de visión única o con placebo. El período de seguimiento fue de al menos un año en todos los estudios.

Los fármacos antimuscarínicos (gotas oculares) presentaron los mayores efectos positivos para la desaceleración de la progresión de la miopía, pero provocan sensibilidad a la luz o visión cercana borrosa y todavía no están disponibles para el uso. Se encontró que los anteojos multifocales que incluyen las LP y los anteojos bifocales, provocaron una desaceleración pequeña en la progresión de la miopía. Se encontró que la hipocorrección de la miopía aumentó ligeramente la progresión de la miopía, aunque no se encontraron pruebas de efecto de las LCRPG sobre el crecimiento del ojo miope.

Notas de traducción

Traducido por: Centro Cochrane Iberoamericano
Traducción patrocinada por: No especificada

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Resumen en términos sencillos
  6. Résumé
  7. Résumé simplifié

Interventions to slow progression of myopia in children

Contexte

La myopie entraine une vision trouble des objets éloignés. Les personnes atteintes d’une forte myopie sont plus exposées à divers problèmes de vision, comme un décollement de rétine, une atrophie choroïdienne, la cataracte et le glaucome. Les interventions qui ont été explorées afin de ralentir la progression de la myopie incluent des lunettes bifocales, des gouttes cycloplégiques, des médicaments visant à réduire la pression intra-oculaire, des antagonistes des récepteurs muscariniques et des lentilles de contact. L’objectif de cette revue était d’évaluer de façon systématique l’efficacité des stratégies pour contrôler la progression de la myopie chez les enfants.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets de différents types d’interventions, notamment les gouttes oculaires, la sous-correction de la myopie, les lunettes et des lentilles de contact multifocales, sur la progression de la myopie chez les enfants myopes de moins de 18 ans. Nous avons comparé ces interventions d’intérêt les unes aux autres, à des verres à foyer unique (VFU) (lunettes), un placebo ou l’absence de traitement.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans CENTRAL (qui contient le registre des essais du groupe Cochrane sur l’ophtalmologie) (The Cochrane Library 2011, numéro 10), MEDLINE (janvier 1950 à octobre 2011), EMBASE (janvier 1980 à octobre 2011), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (janvier 1982 à octobre 2011), le metaregistre des essais contrôlés (mECR) (www.controlled-trials.com) et ClinicalTrials.gov (http://clinicaltrials.gov). Aucune restriction de date ou de langue n’a été appliquée aux recherches électroniques d’essais. Des recherches dans les bases de données électroniques ont été effectuées pour la dernière fois le 11 octobre 2011. Nous avons également consulté les listes bibliographiques et Science Citation Index afin d’identifier des études supplémentaires et potentiellement pertinentes.

Critères de sélection

Nous avons inclus les essais contrôlés randomisés (ECR) dans lesquels les participants étaient traités avec des lunettes, des lentilles de contact ou des agents pharmaceutiques en vue de contrôler la progression de la myopie. Nous avons exclu les essais dans lesquels les participants étaient âgés de plus de 18 ans à l’inclusion ou les participants dont la myopie était inférieure à - 0,25 dioptries (D) d’équivalent sphérique de la myopie.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont extrait les données et évalué les risques de biais pour chaque étude incluse, de façon indépendante. Quand cela était possible, nous avons analysé les données à l’aide de la méthode de variance inverse en utilisant un modèle à effets fixes ou à effets aléatoires, en fonction du nombre d’études et du niveau d’hétérogénéité détecté.

Résultats Principaux

Nous avons inclus 23 études (4 696 participants au total) dans cette revue, dont 17 ont été incluses dans une analyse quantitative. Étant donné que nous avons uniquement inclus des ECR dans cette revue, les études présentaient en général de faibles risques de biais pour le biais de sélection. La sous-correction de la myopie entraînait une légère augmentation de la progression de la myopie dans deux études ; pour les enfants faisant l’objet d’une sous-correction, on constatait une augmentation moyenne de 0,15 D (intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % - 0,29 à 0,00), de plus que les porteurs de VFU à correction totale, à un an. Aucune preuve n’a été identifiée au niveau des lentilles de contact rigides perméables au gaz (LCRPG) quant à leur effet sur la progression de la myopie dans deux études (aucune méta-analyse n’a été réalisée en raison de l’hétérogénéité entre les études). Les verres à foyer progressif (VFP), utilisés dans quatre études, et les lunettes bifocales, utilisées dans quatre études, ne contribuaient qu’à un léger ralentissement de la progression de la myopie. Dans sept études disposant de données quantitatives à un an, les enfants portant des verres multifocaux, VFP ou bifocaux, progressaient de 0,16 D (IC à 95 % 0,07 à 0,25) de moins que les enfants portant des VFU. Les effets positifs les plus probants concernant le ralentissement de la progression de la myopie provenaient des médicaments anti-muscariniques. A un an, les enfants traités au gel pirenzépine (deux études), aux gouttes ophtalmiques de cyclopentolate (une étude) ou aux gouttes ophtalmiques d’atropine (deux études), avaient une progression de la myopie significativement plus faible que les enfants traités avec un placebo (différences moyennes (DM) 0,31 (IC à 95 % 0,17 à 0,44), 0,34 (IC à 95 % 0,08 à 0,60) et 0,80 (IC à 95 % 0,70 à 0,90), respectivement).

Conclusions des auteurs

Le traitement ayant le plus de chance d’être efficace pour ralentir la progression de la myopie à l’heure actuelle est l’administration de médicaments topiques anti-muscariniques. Toutefois, les effets secondaires de ces médicaments incluent une sensibilité à la lumière et une vision de près trouble. Ils ne sont pas encore disponibles sur le marché, leur utilisation est donc limitée et n’est pas appliquée. D’autres informations sont requises pour les autres méthodes de contrôle de la myopie, comme l’utilisation prometteuse de lentilles de contact pour le remodelage de la cornée ou de lentilles de contact souples bifocales (LCSB) avec un centre optique situé à distance, mais il n’existe aucun essai contrôlé publié pour l’instant.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Resumen
  5. Resumen en términos sencillos
  6. Résumé
  7. Résumé simplifié

Interventions to slow progression of myopia in children

Interventions visant à ralentir la progression de la myopie chez les enfants

La myopie est un défaut de la vision qui se trouble lorsque des objets sont observés à distance. Aux États-Unis, environ 30 % de la population est atteinte de myopie et dans certains pays asiatiques, 80 % des enfants seraient myopes. Plusieurs études ont examiné diverses méthodes (y compris les gouttes ophtalmiques, une correction partielle (aussi appelée « sous-correction ») de la myopie, des verres et des lentilles de contact multifocaux) pour ralentir l’aggravation de la myopie.

Dans cette revue, nous avons inclus 23 essais cliniques de traitements de la myopie réalisés chez des enfants. Deux études examinaient la sous-correction de la myopie ; douze études examinaient les lunettes multifocales (verres à foyer progressif (VFP) ou lunettes bifocales) ; une étude a examiné les lentilles de contact souples bifocales (LCSB) ; une étude a examiné de nouveaux verres conçus pour réduire la défocalisation hypermétropique périphérique (hypermétropie de la vision périphérique) (c’est-à-dire des verres permettant une focalisation de la vision périphérique, ainsi que de la vision centrale), deux études examinaient les lentilles de contact rigides perméables au gaz (LCRPG) ; et six études examinaient les gouttes ophtalmiques pharmaceutiques (cinq de ces études portaient sur des médicaments anti-muscariniques). Une seule étude examinait les lentilles multifocales et les gouttes ophtalmiques pharmaceutiques. Dans toutes les études, les interventions d’intérêt étaient comparées les unes aux autres, aux verres à foyer unique (VFU) (lunettes), aux lentilles de contact souple à vision unique (LCSVU) ou à un placebo. La période de suivi s’étendait sur au moins un an pour toutes les études.

Les effets positifs les plus efficaces pour le ralentissement de la progression de la myopie provenaient des médicaments anti-muscariniques (gouttes ophtalmiques), mais ces derniers provoquent une sensibilité à la lumière ou troublent la vision de près et ne sont pas encore commercialisés. Avec les lunettes multifocales, y compris les VFP et les lunettes bifocales, on constate un léger ralentissement de la progression de la myopie. Il a été constaté que la sous-correction de la myopie augmente légèrement sa progression, alors qu’aucune preuve n’a permis de démontrer que les LCRPG ont des effets sur sa progression.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 1st January, 2012
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français