Conservative management following closed reduction of traumatic anterior dislocation of the shoulder

  • Conclusions changed
  • Review
  • Intervention

Authors

  • Nigel CA Hanchard,

    Corresponding author
    1. Teesside University, Health and Social Care Institute, Middlesbrough, Tees Valley, UK
    • Nigel CA Hanchard, Health and Social Care Institute, Teesside University, Middlesbrough, Tees Valley, TS1 3BA, UK. n.hanchard@tees.ac.uk.

    Search for more papers by this author
  • Lorna M Goodchild,

    1. The James Cook University Hospital, South Tees Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Physiotherapy, Middlesbrough, Tees Valley, UK
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Lucksy Kottam

    1. The James Cook University Hospital, South Tees Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Department of Orthopaedics, Middlesbrough, UK
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Background

Acute anterior dislocation, which is the most common type of shoulder dislocation, usually results from an injury. Subsequently, the shoulder is less stable and is more susceptible to re-dislocation, especially in active young adults. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2006.

Objectives

To assess the effects (benefits and harms) of conservative interventions after closed reduction of traumatic anterior dislocation of the shoulder. These might include immobilisation, rehabilitative interventions or both.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register (September 2013), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (2013, Issue 8), MEDLINE (1946 to September 2013), EMBASE (1980 to Week 38, 2013), CINAHL (1982 to September 2013), PEDro (1929 to November 2012), OTseeker (inception to November 2012) and trial registries. We also searched conference proceedings and reference lists of included studies.

Selection criteria

Randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing various conservative interventions versus control (no or sham treatment) or other conservative interventions applied after closed reduction of traumatic anterior dislocation of the shoulder.

Data collection and analysis

All review authors independently selected trials, assessed risk of bias and extracted data. Study authors were contacted for additional information. Results of comparable groups of trials were pooled.

Main results

We included three randomised trials and one quasi-randomised trial, which involved 470 participants (371 male) with primary traumatic anterior dislocation of the shoulder reduced by various closed methods. Three studies evaluated mixed populations; in the fourth study, all participants were male and 80% were soldiers. All trials were at some risk of bias but to a differing extent. One was at high risk in all domains of the risk of bias tool, and one was at unclear or high risk in all domains; the other two trials were deemed to have predominantly low risk across all domains. Overall, reflecting both the risk of bias and the imprecision of findings, we judged the quality of evidence to be "very low" for all outcomes, meaning that we are very uncertain about the estimates of effect.

The four trials evaluated the same comparison - immobilisation in external rotation versus internal rotation - and each of our three primary outcomes (re-dislocation, patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) for shoulder instability and resumption of activities) was reported by one or more of the trials, with two-year or longer follow-up. Pooling was possible for "re-dislocation" (three trials) and for aspects of "resumption of sport/activities at pre-injury level" (two trials).

There was no evidence to show a difference between the two groups in re-dislocation at two-year or longer follow-up (risk ratio (RR) 1.06 favouring internal rotation, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.73 to 1.54; P value 0.77; 252 participants; three trials). In a low-risk population, with an illustrative baseline risk of 247 re-dislocations per 1000, these data equate to 15 more (95% CI 67 fewer to 133 more) re-dislocations per 1000 after immobilisation in external rotation. In a medium-risk population, with an illustrative baseline risk of 436 re-dislocations per 1000, the data equate to 26 more (95% CI 118 fewer to 235 more) re-dislocations after immobilisation in external rotation.

Nor was evidence found to show a difference between the two groups in return to pre-injury levels of activity at two-year or longer follow-up (RR 1.25 favouring external rotation, 95% CI 0.71 to 2.2; P value 0.43; 278 participants; two trials). In a low-risk population, with an illustrative baseline risk of 204 participants per 1000 returning to pre-injury levels of activity, this equates to 41 more (95% CI 59 fewer to 245 more) participants per 1000 resuming activity after immobilisation in external rotation. In a high-risk population, with an illustrative baseline risk of 605 participants per 1000 returning to pre-injury levels of activity, this equates to 161 more (95% CI 76 fewer to 395 more) participants per 1000 resuming activity after immobilisation in external rotation.

One trial reported that the difference between the two groups in Western Ontario Shoulder Instability Index scores, analysed using non-parametric statistics, was "not significant (P = 0.32)". Of our secondary outcomes, pooling was possible for "any instability" (two trials) and for important adverse events (three events, two trials). However, adverse event data were collected only in an ad hoc way, and it is unclear whether identification and reporting of such events was comprehensive. No report addressed participant satisfaction or health-related quality of life outcome measures.

There was no evidence confirming a difference between the two positions of immobilisation in any of the primary or secondary outcomes; for each outcome, the confidence intervals were wide, covering the possibility of substantial benefit for each intervention.

Authors' conclusions

Numerous conservative strategies may be adopted after closed reduction of a traumatic anterior dislocation of the shoulder, and many warrant investigation. However, our review reveals that evidence from randomised controlled trials is only available for a single approach: immobilisation in external rotation versus immobilisation in the traditional position of internal rotation. Moreover, this evidence is insufficient to demonstrate whether immobilisation in external rotation confers any benefit over immobilisation in internal rotation.

We identified six unpublished trials and two ongoing trials that compare immobilisation in external versus internal rotation. Given this, the main priority for research on this question consists of the publication of completed trials, and the completion and publication of ongoing trials. Meanwhile, increased attention to other interventions is required. Sufficiently powered, good quality, well reported randomised controlled trials with long-term surveillance should be conducted to examine the optimum duration of immobilisation, whether immobilisation is necessary at all (in older age groups particularly), which rehabilitative interventions work best and the acceptability to participants of different care strategies.

Résumé scientifique

La prise en charge conservatrice suite à une réduction fermée de la luxation antérieure traumatique de l'épaule

Contexte

La luxation antérieure aiguë, qui est le type le plus courant de la luxation de l'épaule, résulte généralement d'une blessure. Par la suite, l'épaule est moins stable et plus susceptible d'une nouvelle luxation, en particulier chez les jeunes adultes actifs. Ceci est une mise à jour d'une revue Cochrane publiée pour la première fois en 2006.

Objectifs

Évaluer les effets (bénéfiques et délétères) des interventions conservatrices après une réduction fermée de la luxation antérieure traumatique de l'épaule. Celles-ci peuvent inclure l'immobilisation, les interventions de rééducation ou les deux.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué des recherches dans le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les traumatismes ostéo-articulaires et musculaires (septembre 2013), le registre Cochrane des essais contrôlés (CENTRAL) (2013, numéro 8), MEDLINE (de 1946 à septembre 2013), EMBASE (de 1980 à la semaine 38, 2013), CINAHL (de 1982 à septembre 2013), PEDro (de 1929 à novembre 2012), OTseeker (des origines à novembre 2012) et les registres d'essais. Nous avons également effectué des recherches dans les actes de conférence et les références bibliographiques des études incluses.

Critères de sélection

Essais contrôlés randomisés ou quasi randomisés comparant différentes interventions conservatrices par rapport à un témoin (absence de traitement ou traitement fictif) ou à d'autres interventions conservatrices après une réduction fermée de la luxation antérieure traumatique de l'épaule.

Recueil et analyse des données

Tous les auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment sélectionné les essais, évalué le risque de biais et extrait les données. Les auteurs des études ont été contactés pour obtenir des informations supplémentaires. Les résultats des groupes d'essais comparables ont été combinés.

Résultats principaux

Nous avons inclus trois essais randomisés et un essai quasi randomisé, qui portaient sur 470 participants (371 hommes) atteints de luxation antérieure traumatique de l'épaule réduite par diverses méthodes fermées. Trois études évaluaient des populations mixtes ; dans la quatrième étude, tous les participants étaient des hommes et 80 % étaient des soldats. Tous les essais présentaient un risque de biais mais à des degrés divers. L'un était à risque élevé dans tous les domaines de l'outil de risque de biais, et un essai était à risque incertain ou élevé dans tous les domaines ; les deux autres essais ont été considérées à risque principalement faible dans tous les domaines. Dans l'ensemble, au regard des risques de biais et de l'imprécision des résultats, nous avons estimé que la qualité des preuves était « très faible » pour tous les critères de jugement, ce qui signifie que nous avons beaucoup d'incertitudes concernant les estimations d'effet.

Les quatre essais évaluaient une même comparaison - l'immobilisation dans la rotation externe par rapport à la rotation interne - et chacun de nos trois critères de jugement principaux (nouvelle luxation, mesures de résultats rapportés par les patients (PROM) pour l'instabilité de l'épaule, reprise des activités) a été rapporté par au moins un essai, avec un suivi d'au moins deux ans. Le regroupement était possible pour « nouvelle luxation » (trois essais) et pour certains aspects de « reprise du sport / des activités au niveau d'avant la blessure » (deux essais).

Il n'y avait aucune preuve permettant de démontrer une différence entre les deux groupes en termes de nouvelle luxation à deux ans ou lors d'un suivi plus long (risque relatif (RR) 1,06 en faveur de la rotation interne, intervalle de confiance (IC) à 95 % 0,73 à 1,54 ; P = 0,77 ; 252 participants ; trois essais). Dans une population à faible risque, avec un risque de base illustratif de 247 nouvelles luxations pour 1 000, ces données reviennent à 15 (IC à 95 % de moins 67 à plus 133) nouvelles luxations en plus pour 1 000 suite à l'immobilisation dans la rotation externe. Dans une population à risque moyen, avec un risque de base illustratif de 436 nouvelles luxations pour 1 000, les données reviennent à 26 (IC à 95 % de moins 118 à plus 235) nouvelles luxations en plus suite à l'immobilisation dans la rotation externe.

De même, aucune preuve n'a été trouvée pour démontrer une différence entre les deux groupes dans la reprise des niveaux d'activité d'avant la blessure à deux ans ou lors d'un suivi plus long (RR 1,25 en faveur de la rotation externe, IC à 95 % 0,71 à 2,2 ; P = 0,43 ; 278 participants ; deux essais). Dans une population à faible risque, avec un risque de base illustratif de 204 participants sur 1 000 revenant à leurs niveaux d'activité d'avant la blessure, cela correspond à 41 (IC à 95 % de moins 59 à plus 245) participants de plus sur 1 000 reprenant leurs activités après l'immobilisation dans la rotation externe. Dans une population à haut risque, avec un risque de base illustratif de 605 participants sur 1 000 revenant à leurs niveaux d'activité d'avant la blessure, cela correspond à 161 (IC à 95 % de moins 76 à plus 395) participants de plus sur 1 000 reprenant leurs activités après l'immobilisation dans la rotation externe.

Un essai a rapporté que la différence entre les deux groupes en termes de scores sur l'indice de l'instabilité de l'épaule de Western Ontario (WOSI), analysés à l'aide de statistiques non paramétriques, était « non significative (P = 0,32) ». De nos critères de jugement secondaires, le regroupement était possible pour « toute instabilité » (deux essais) et pour les événements indésirables graves (trois événements, deux essais). Cependant, les données sur les événements indésirables ont été recueillies seulement de manière ad hoc, et il est difficile de savoir si l'identification et la notification de ces événements était exhaustive. Aucun rapport n'a examiné la satisfaction des participants ou des mesures de résultats sur la qualité de vie liée à la santé.

Il n'y avait aucune preuve confirmant l'existence d'une différence entre les deux positions d'immobilisation dans aucun des critères de jugement principaux ou secondaires ; pour chaque critère de jugement, les intervalles de confiance étaient larges, comprenant la possibilité d'un bénéfice substantiel pour chaque intervention.

Conclusions des auteurs

De nombreuses stratégies de conservation peuvent être adoptées après une réduction fermée d'une luxation antérieure traumatique de l'épaule, et plusieurs méritent d'être étudiées. Cependant, notre revue révèle que des preuves issues d'essais contrôlés randomisés ne sont disponibles que pour une seule approche : l'immobilisation dans la rotation externe par rapport à l'immobilisation dans la position traditionnelle de la rotation interne. De plus, ces preuves sont insuffisantes pour démontrer si l'immobilisation dans la rotation externe confère un quelconque avantage par rapport à l'immobilisation dans la rotation interne.

Nous avons identifié six essais non publiés et deux essais en cours qui comparent l'immobilisation dans la rotation interne versus externe. De ce fait, la première priorité pour les recherches sur cette question concerne la publication des essais achevés et l'achèvement et la publication des essais en cours. En attendant, d'autres interventions requièrent plus d'attention. Des essais contrôlés randomisés de bonne qualité, à la puissance statistique suffisante et bien documentés, avec une surveillance à long terme, doivent être réalisés pour examiner la durée optimale d'immobilisation, la nécessité même de l'immobilisation (en particulier chez les personnes âgées), les interventions de rééducation fonctionnant le mieux ainsi que l'acceptabilité de différentes stratégies de soins pour les participants.

Plain language summary

Non-surgical management after non-surgical repositioning of traumatic anterior dislocation of the shoulder

Acute anterior shoulder dislocation is an injury in which the top end of the upper arm bone is pushed out of the joint socket in a forward direction. Afterwards, the shoulder is less stable and is prone to re-dislocation or subluxation (partial re-dislocation), especially in active young adults. Initial treatment involves putting the joint back in place. This is called 'closed reduction' when it is done without surgery. Subsequent treatment is often conservative (non-surgical) and generally involves placement of the injured arm in a sling or in another immobilising device followed by specific exercises.

After a comprehensive search, completed in September 2013, for randomised controlled trials that compared different methods of conservative management of these injuries we included only four trials, one of which was not truly randomised. These trials involved a total of 470 participants (371 male). All had primary traumatic anterior dislocation of the shoulder reduced by various closed methods. Three studies evaluated mixed populations; in the fourth study, all participants were male and 80% were soldiers. All trials were at some risk of bias (systematic errors that could lead to overestimation or underestimation of treatment effectiveness), with two trials in particular being at high risk of bias in a number of aspects. Overall, the quality of the evidence was very low, meaning that we are very uncertain about the direction and size of effect.

All four trials compared immobilisation of the arm in external rotation (when the arm is orientated outwards with the forearm away from the chest) versus immobilisation in internal rotation (the usual sling position, where the arm rests against the chest) following closed reduction. Investigators followed patients for at least two years. The results showed no difference between the two groups in any of our pre-defined outcomes. These included re-dislocations, scores on validated shoulder function questionnaires, return to pre-injury activity or sport, and any instability. Other pre-defined outcomes (patient satisfaction with the intervention, and health-related quality of life outcome data) were not reported. Adverse events were poorly recorded.

In our recommendations for future research, we point out the importance of completing and publishing the eight other trials making the same comparison as the four included trials. We also note that other important questions need to be studied, such as how long the shoulder should be immobilised for the best outcomes. In conclusion, current evidence from randomised controlled trials is insufficient to inform choices for conservative management following closed reduction of traumatic anterior dislocation of the shoulder.

Résumé simplifié

La prise en charge non chirurgicale après le repositionnement non chirurgical de la luxation antérieure traumatique de l'épaule

La luxation antérieure aiguë de l'épaule est une blessure dans laquelle l'extrémité supérieure de l'os du bras sort de son articulation vers l'avant. Par la suite, l'épaule est moins stable et est susceptible d'une nouvelle luxation ou d'une subluxation (une nouvelle luxation partielle), en particulier chez les jeunes adultes actifs. Le traitement initial consiste à remettre l'articulation en place. On parle de « réduction fermée » lorsque celle-ci est pratiquée sans chirurgie. Le traitement ultérieur est souvent conservateur (non chirurgical) et implique généralement l'immobilisation du bras blessé dans une écharpe ou un autre dispositif, suivie par des exercices spécifiques.

Après une recherche exhaustive effectuée en septembre 2013 pour les essais contrôlés randomisés comparant différentes méthodes de prise en charge conservatrice de ces blessures, nous avons uniquement inclus quatre essais, dont l'un n'était pas véritablement randomisé. Ces essais portaient sur un total de 470 participants (371 hommes). Tous présentaient une luxation antérieure primaire traumatique de l'épaule réduite par diverses méthodes fermées. Trois études évaluaient des populations mixtes ; dans la quatrième étude, tous les participants étaient des hommes et 80 % étaient des soldats. Tous les essais présentaient un risque de biais (erreurs systématiques qui peuvent conduire à une surestimation ou sous-estimation des l'efficacité du traitement), avec deux essais, en particulier, étant à risque élevé de biais dans un certain nombre d'aspects. Dans l'ensemble, la qualité des preuves était très faible, ce qui signifie que nous ne pouvons pas estimer avec certitude la direction et l'ampleur de l'effet.

Les quatre essais comparaient l'immobilisation du bras dans la rotation externe (lorsque le bras est dirigé vers l'extérieur et l'avant-bras détache de la poitrine) par rapport à l'immobilisation dans la rotation interne (la position habituelle dans l'écharpe, où le bras repose contre la poitrine) suite à une réduction fermée. Les investigateurs suivaient les patients pendant au moins deux ans. Les résultats n'ont montré aucune différence entre les deux groupes pour aucun de nos critères de jugement prédéfinis. Ceux-ci incluaient les nouvelles luxations, les scores sur la fonction de l'épaule de questionnaires validés, la reprise d'une activité ou d'un sport d'avant la blessure et toute instabilité. Les autres critères de jugement prédéfinis (la satisfaction des patients vis-à-vis de l'intervention et les données de résultat sur la qualité de vie liée à la santé) n'étaient pas rapportés. Les événements indésirables étaient mal consignés.

Dans nos recommandations pour les recherches futures, nous avons souligné l'importance de terminer et de publier les huit autres essais effectuant les mêmes comparaisons que les quatre essais inclus. Nous avons également noté que d'autres questions importantes doivent être étudiées, telles que la durée optimale de l'immobilisation de l'épaule pour les meilleurs résultats. En conclusion, les preuves actuelles issues d'essais contrôlés randomisés sont insuffisantes pour orienter les choix pour la prise en charge conservatrice suite à une réduction fermée de la luxation antérieure traumatique de l'épaule.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 16th July, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé

Laienverständliche Zusammenfassung

Nicht-operatives Management nach nicht-operativer Reposition (Wiedereinrichtung) einer traumatischen (verletzungsbedingten) vorderen Schulterluxation

Eine akute vordere Schulterluxation ist eine Verletzung, bei der das obere Ende des Oberarmknochens aus der Gelenkpfanne nach vorne herausgedrückt wird. Anschließend ist die Schulter weniger stabil und anfällig für eine Reluxation (erneute Luxation) oder Subluxation (teilweise Reluxation), insbesondere bei aktiven jungen Erwachsenen. Die Erstbehandlung besteht darin, das Gelenk wieder in seine ursprüngliche Stellung zu bringen. Dies wird als 'geschlossene Reposition' bezeichnet, wenn es ohne einen operativen Eingriff erfolgt. Die weitere Behandlung ist oft konservativ (nicht-operativ) und beinhaltet im allgemeinen die Lagerung des verletzten Armes in einer Schlinge oder einer anderen ruhigstellenden Vorrichtung, gefolgt von spezifischen Übungen.

Nach einer umfassenden, im September 2013 abgeschlossenen Suche nach randomisierten kontrollierten Studien (Studien, in denen die Teilnehmer zufällig zwei oder mehr verschiedenen Studiengruppen zugeteilt werden), die verschiedene Methoden des konservativen Managements dieser Verletzung miteinander verglichen, schlossen wir nur vier Studien ein, von denen eine nicht wirklich randomisiert war. Diese Studien umfassten insgesamt 470 Teilnehmer (371 männlich). Alle hatten eine erste traumatische vordere Schulterluxation, die mit verschiedenen geschlossenen Verfahren gerichtet wurde. Drei Studien untersuchten gemischte Patientengruppen; in der vierten Studie waren alle Teilnehmer männlich und 80% Soldaten. Alle Studien waren von einem Verzerrungsrisiko betroffen (systematische Fehler, die zu einer Überschätzung oder Unterschätzung der Behandlungseffektivität führen können); insbesondere zwei Studien waren bezüglich mehrerer Aspekte von einem hohen Verzerrungsrisiko betroffen. Insgesamt war die Qualität der Evidenz (des wissenschaftlichen Belegs) sehr niedrig, was bedeutet, dass wir bezüglich der Richtung und Größe des Effektes sehr unsicher sind.

Alle vier Studien verglichen eine Ruhigstellung des Armes in Außenrotation (wenn der Arm mit dem Unterarm vom Oberkörper weg nach außen gedreht ist) gegenüber einer Ruhigstellung in Innenrotation (die übliche Schlingenposition, bei der der Arm dem Oberkörper anliegt) nach geschlossener Reposition. Die Untersucher folgten den Patienten über mindestens zwei Jahre. Die Ergebnisse ergaben für keinen unserer vordefinierten Endpunkte (Zielkriterien) einen Unterschied zwischen den Gruppen. Die Endpunkte waren Reluxationen, die Ergebnisse validierter (wissenschaftlich fundierter) Schulterfunktions-Fragebögen, die Wiederaufnahme von vor der Verletzung durchgeführten Aktivitäten oder Sport, oder Instabilität. Zu anderen vordefinierten Endpunkten (Patientenzufriedenheit mit der Behandlung und Ergebnisdaten zur gesundheitsbezogenen Lebensqualität) wurden keine Angaben gemacht. Unerwünschte Ereignisse wurden nur dürftig erfasst.

In unseren Empfehlungen für zukünftige Forschung heben wir die Bedeutung des Abschlusses und der Veröffentlichung der acht weiteren Studien hervor, die denselben Behandlungsvergleich wie die vier eingeschlossenen Studien durchgeführt haben. Wir stellen zudem fest, dass andere wichtige Fragen untersucht werden müssen, wie zum Beispiel, wie lange die Schulter ruhiggestellt werden sollte, um die besten Ergebnisse zu erbringen. Schlussfolgernd ist die derzeitige Evidenz aus randomisierten kontrollierten Studien als Entscheidungshilfe für das konservative Management nach geschlossener Reposition einer traumatischen vorderen Schulterluxation unzureichend.

Anmerkungen zur Übersetzung

C. Braun, K. Ehrenbrusthoff, N. Jahnke, Koordination durch Cochrane Schweiz