Intervention Review

Exercise for improving balance in older people

  1. Tracey E Howe1,*,
  2. Lynn Rochester2,
  3. Fiona Neil3,
  4. Dawn A Skelton4,
  5. Claire Ballinger5

Editorial Group: Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group

Published Online: 9 NOV 2011

Assessed as up-to-date: 1 APR 2011

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004963.pub3

How to Cite

Howe TE, Rochester L, Neil F, Skelton DA, Ballinger C. Exercise for improving balance in older people. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2011, Issue 11. Art. No.: CD004963. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004963.pub3.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Glasgow City of Science, Glasgow, Scotland, UK

  2. 2

    Newcastle University, Institute for Ageing and Health, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK

  3. 3

    Greater Glasgow and Clyde NHS, Community Falls Prevention Programme, Glasgow, Scotland, UK

  4. 4

    Glasgow Caledonian University, The Scottish Centre for Evidence Based Care of Older People: a Collaborating Centre of the Joanna Briggs Institute, Glasgow, UK

  5. 5

    NIHR Research Design Service South Central, Primary Care and Population Sciences, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK

*Tracey E Howe, Glasgow City of Science, 13 The Square, University of Glasgow, Glasgow, Scotland, G12 8QQ, UK. tracey.howe@gcu.ac.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: Edited (no change to conclusions), comment added to review
  2. Published Online: 9 NOV 2011

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Abstract
  7. Plain language summary
  8. 摘要
  9. 一般語言總結

Background

In older adults, diminished balance is associated with reduced physical functioning and an increased risk of falling. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2007.

Objectives

To examine the effects of exercise interventions on balance in older people, aged 60 and over, living in the community or in institutional care.

Search methods

We searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 1), MEDLINE and EMBASE (to February 2011).

Selection criteria

Randomised controlled studies testing the effects of exercise interventions on balance in older people. The primary outcomes of the review were clinical measures of balance.

Data collection and analysis

Pairs of review authors independently assessed risk of bias and extracted data from studies. Data were pooled where appropriate.

Main results

This update included 94 studies (62 new) with 9,821 participants. Most participants were women living in their own home.

Most trials were judged at unclear risk of selection bias, generally reflecting inadequate reporting of the randomisation methods, but at high risk of performance bias relating to lack of participant blinding, which is largely unavoidable for these trials. Most studies only reported outcome up to the end of the exercise programme.

There were eight categories of exercise programmes. These are listed below together with primary measures of balance for which there was some evidence of a statistically significant effect at the end of the exercise programme. Some trials tested more than one type of exercise. Crucially, the evidence for each outcome was generally from only a few of the trials for each exercise category.

1. Gait, balance, co-ordination and functional tasks (19 studies of which 10 provided primary outcome data): Timed Up & Go test (mean difference (MD) -0.82 s; 95% CI -1.56 to -0.08 s, 114 participants, 4 studies); walking speed (standardised mean difference (SMD) 0.43; 95% CI 0.11 to 0.75, 156 participants, 4 studies), and the Berg Balance Scale (MD 3.48 points; 95% CI 2.01 to 4.95 points, 145 participants, 4 studies).

2. Strengthening exercise (including resistance or power training) (21 studies of which 11 provided primary outcome data): Timed Up & Go Test (MD -4.30 s; 95% CI -7.60 to -1.00 s, 71 participants, 3 studies); standing on one leg for as long as possible with eyes closed (MD 1.64 s; 95% CI 0.97 to 2.31 s, 120 participants, 3 studies); and walking speed (SMD 0.25; 95% CI 0.05 to 0.46, 375 participants, 8 studies).

3. 3D (3 dimensional) exercise (including Tai Chi, qi gong, dance, yoga) (15 studies of which seven provided primary outcome data): Timed Up & Go Test (MD -1.30 s; 95% CI -2.40 to -0.20 s, 44 participants, 1 study); standing on one leg for as long as possible with eyes open (MD 9.60 s; 95% CI 6.64 to 12.56 s, 47 participants, 1 study), and with eyes closed (MD 2.21 s; 95% CI 0.69 to 3.73 s, 48 participants, 1 study); and the Berg Balance Scale (MD 1.06 points; 95% CI 0.37 to 1.76 points, 150 participants, 2 studies).

4. General physical activity (walking) (seven studies of which five provided primary outcome data).

5. General physical activity (cycling) (one study which provided data for walking speed).

6. Computerised balance training using visual feedback (two studies, neither of which provided primary outcome data).

7. Vibration platform used as intervention (three studies of which one provided primary outcome data).

8. Multiple exercise types (combinations of the above) (43 studies of which 29 provided data for one or more primary outcomes): Timed Up & Go Test (MD -1.63 s; 95% CI -2.28 to -0.98 s, 635 participants, 12 studies); standing on one leg for as long as possible with eyes open (MD 5.03 s; 95% CI 1.19 to 8.87 s, 545 participants, 9 studies), and with eyes closed ((MD 1.60 s; 95% CI -0.01 to 3.20 s, 176 participants, 2 studies); and the Berg Balance Scale ((MD 1.84 points; 95% CI 0.71 to 2.97 points, 80 participants, 2 studies).

Few adverse events were reported but most studies did not monitor or report adverse events.

In general, the more effective programmes ran three times a week for three months and involved dynamic exercise in standing.

Authors' conclusions

There is weak evidence that some types of exercise (gait, balance, co-ordination and functional tasks; strengthening exercise; 3D exercise and multiple exercise types) are moderately effective, immediately post intervention, in improving clinical balance outcomes in older people. Such interventions are probably safe. There is either no or insufficient evidence to draw any conclusions for general physical activity (walking or cycling) and exercise involving computerised balance programmes or vibration plates. Further high methodological quality research using core outcome measures and adequate surveillance is required.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Abstract
  7. Plain language summary
  8. 摘要
  9. 一般語言總結

Exercise for improving balance in older people

Balance is staying upright and steady when stationary, such as when standing or sitting, or during movement. The loss of ability to balance may be linked with a higher risk of falling, increased dependency, illness and sometimes early death. However, it is unclear which types of exercise are best at improving balance in older people (aged 60 years and over) living at home or in residential care. 

This updated review includes 94 (62 new to this update) randomised controlled trials involving 9821 participants. Most participants were women living in their own home. Some studies included frail people residing in hospital or residential facilities.

Many of the trials had flawed or poorly described methods that meant that their findings could be biased. Most studies only reported outcome up to the end of the exercise programme. Thus they did not check to see if there were any lasting effects.

We chose to report on measures of balance that relate to everyday activities such as time taken to stand up, walk three metres, turn and return to sitting (Timed Up & Go test); ability to stand on one leg (necessary for safe walking in well lit and dark conditions), walking speed (better balance allows faster walking), and activities of daily living (Berg Balance Scale, comprising 14 items). These were our primary outcomes.

There were eight categories of exercise programmes. These are listed below together with those measures of balance for which there was some evidence of a positive (statistically significant) effect from the specific type of exercise at the end of the exercise programme. Some trials tested more than one type of exercise. It is important to note that the evidence for each outcome was generally from only a few of the trials for each exercise category.

1. Gait, balance, co-ordination and functional tasks (19 studies of which 10 provided data for one or more primary outcomes). Positive effects of exercise were found for the Timed Up & Go test, walking speed, and the Berg Balance Scale.

2. Strengthening exercise (including resistance or power training) (21 studies of which 11 provided data for one or more primary outcomes). Positive effects were found for the Timed Up & Go Test; standing on one leg for as long as possible with eyes closed; and walking speed.

3. 3D (3 dimensional) exercise (including Tai Chi, qi gong, dance, yoga) (15 studies of which seven provided data for one or more primary outcomes). Positive effects were found for the Timed Up & Go Test; standing on one leg for as long as possible with eyes open, and with eyes closed; and the Berg Balance Scale.

4. General physical activity (walking) (seven studies of which five provided data for one or more primary outcomes).

5. General physical activity (cycling) (one study which provided data for walking speed).

6. Computerised balance training using visual feedback (two studies, neither of which provided data for any primary outcome).

7. Vibration platform used as intervention (three studies of which one provided data for the Timed Up & Go Test).

8. Multiple exercise types (combinations of the above) (43 studies of which 29 provided data for one or more primary outcomes). Positive effects were found for the Timed Up & Go Test; standing on one leg for as long as possible with eyes open, and with eyes closed; and the Berg Balance Scale.

In general, effective programmes ran three times a week for three months and involved dynamic exercise in standing. Few adverse events were reported.

The review concluded that there was weak evidence that some exercise types are moderately effective, immediately post intervention, in improving balance in older people. However, the missing data and compromised methods of many included trials meant that further high quality research is required.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Abstract
  7. Plain language summary
  8. 摘要
  9. 一般語言總結

Exercice pour améliorer l'équilibre chez les personnes âgées

Contexte

Chez les personnes âgées, la diminution de l'équilibre est associée à une réduction du fonctionnement physique et une augmentation du risque de chute. Ceci est une mise à jour dune revue Cochrane publiée pour la première fois en 2007.

Objectifs

Examiner les effets des interventions axées sur lexercice physique sur l'équilibre chez les personnes âgées, âgés de 60 ans et plus, vivant dans la communauté ou dans des établissements de soins.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Nous avons effectué une recherche dans le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur les traumatismes ostéo-articulaires et musculaires, CENTRAL (La Bibliothèque Cochrane 2011, numéro 1), MEDLINE et EMBASE (jusqu'à février 2011).

Critères de sélection

Les études contrôlées randomisées évaluant les effets des interventions axées sur lexercice physique sur l'équilibre chez les personnes âgées. Les principaux critères de jugement de la revue étaient les mesures cliniques de l'équilibre.

Recueil et analyse des données

Des paires d'auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment évalué les risques de biais et extrait les données des études. Les données ont été combinées lorsque cela était approprié.

Résultats Principaux

Cette mise à jour comprenait 94 études (62 nouveaux) avec 9,821 participants. La plupart des participants étaient des femmes habitant chez elles.

La plupart des essais ont été jugées comme ayant un risque incertain de biais de sélection, reflétant généralement la description inadaptée des méthodes de randomisation, mais avec un risque élevé de biais de performance d'un manque de masquage des participants, ce qui est rarement évitable pour ces essais. La plupart des études n'ont rapporté les résultats que jusqu'à la fin du programme d'exercice.

Il y avait huit catégories de programmes d'exercice. Celles -ci sont indiquées ci-dessous avec les principales mesures de l'équilibre pour lesquelles il y avait certaines preuves d'un effet statistiquement significatif à la fin du programme d'exercice. Certains essais ont testé plus d'un type d'exercice. Il est important de noter que les preuves pour chaque critère de jugement était en général que de quelques-uns des essais pour chaque catégorie d'exercice.

1. La marche, l'équilibre, la coordination et les tâches fonctionnelles (19 études, dont 10 ont fourni des données pour les critères de jugement principaux): Timed up & Go test (différence moyenne (DM) de -0,82 s ; IC à 95 % entre -1,56 et -0,08 s, 114 participants, 4 études) ; la vitesse de marche (différence moyenne standardisée (DMS) 0,43 ; IC à 95 % 0,11 à 0,75, 156 participants, 4 études), et l'Echelle d'Equilibre de Berg (DM 3,48 points ; IC à 95 % 2,01 à 4,95 points, 145 participants, 4 études).

2. Exercices de renforcement (y compris exercices de résistance ou de puissance) (21 études, dont 11 ont fourni des données pour les critères de jugement principaux) : Timed up & Go test (DM la -4,30 s ; IC à 95 % de -7,60 à -1,00 s, 71 participants, 3 études) ; la station sur une jambe aussi longtemps que possible les yeux fermés (DM 1,64 s ; IC à 95 % 0,97 à 2,31 s, 120 participants, 3 études) ; et la vitesse de marche (DMS de 0,25 ; IC à 95 % 0,05 à 0,46 ; 375 participants, 8 études).

3. 3D (3 dimensions) (y compris Tai Chi, Qi Gong, danse, le yoga) (15 études dont sept ont fourni des données pour les critères de jugement principaux) : Timed up & Go test (DM -1,30 s ; IC à 95 % -2,40 à -0,20 s, 44 participants, 1 étude) ; la station sur une jambe aussi longtemps que possible les yeux ouverts (DM 9,60 s ; IC à 95 % 6,64 à 12.56 s, 47 participants, 1 étude) et les yeux fermés (DM de 2,21 s ; IC à 95 % 0,69 à 3,73 s, 48 participants, 1 étude) ; et l'Echelle d'Equilibre de Berg (DM 1,06 points ; IC à 95 % 0,37 à 1,76 points, 150 participants, 2 études).

4. Activité physique générale (marche) (sept études dont cinq ont fourni des données pour les critères de jugement principaux).

5. Activité physique générale (vélo) (une étude qui a fourni des données pour la vitesse de marche).

6. Exercices d'équilibre contrôlés par ordinateur utilisant une rétroaction visuelle (deux études, dont aucune n'a fourni de données pour les critères de jugement principaux).

7. Plateformes vibrantes utilisées pour des exercices (trois études dont une a fourni des données pour les critères de jugement principaux).

8. Types d'exercice multiples (combinaisons de ce qui précède) (43 études, dont 29 ont fourni des données pour un ou plusieurs critères de jugement principaux) : Test du lever de chaise & de Mathias chronométré (DM la entre -1,63 s ; IC à 95 % entre -2,28 et -0,98 s, 635 participants, 12 études) ; la station sur une jambe aussi longtemps que possible les yeux ouverts (DM 5,03 s ; IC à 95 % 1,19 à 8,87 s, 545 participants, 9 études) et les yeux fermés ((DM 1,60 s ; IC à 95 % -0,01 à 3,20 s, 176 participants, 2 études) ; et l'Echelle d'Equilibre de Berg ((DM 1,84 points ; IC à 95 % 0,71 à 2,97 points, 80 participants, 2 études).

Peu d'événements indésirables ont été signalés, mais la plupart des études ne surveillaient pas ou ne rapportaient pas les événements indésirables.

En général, les programmes les plus efficaces avaient lieu trois fois par semaine pendant trois mois et incluaient des exercices dynamiques en position debout.

Conclusions des auteurs

Il existe peu de preuves indiquant que certains types de l'exercice physique (la marche, l'équilibre, la coordination et les tâches fonctionnelles ; exercices de renforcement ; 3D l'exercice et les types d'exercice multiples) sont modérément efficaces, immédiatement après l'intervention, pour améliorer les résultats d'équilibre cliniques chez les personnes âgées. Ces interventions sont probablement sûres. Il n'existe pas de preuves ou des preuves insuffisantes pour tirer des conclusions concernant une activité physique générale (marche ou vélo) et des exercices portant sur des programmes d'équilibre contrôlés par ordinateur ou des plateformes vibrantes. D'autres recherches de grande qualité méthodologique en utilisant des mesures de résultats essentiels et une surveillance adaptée sont nécessaires.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Abstract
  7. Plain language summary
  8. 摘要
  9. 一般語言總結

Exercice pour améliorer l'équilibre chez les personnes âgées

Exercice pour améliorer l'équilibre chez les personnes âgées

Léquilibre cest se tenir droit et stable à l'arrêt en position debout ou assise, ou en mouvement. La perte de la capacité à l'équilibre peut être associée à un plus grand risque de chute, à une augmentation de la dépendance, à la maladie et parfois au décès précoce. Cependant, on ignore quels types d'exercices sont les plus efficaces pour améliorer l'équilibre chez les personnes âgées (âgés de 60 ans et plus) vivant à domicile ou en résidence médicalisée.

Cette revue mise à jour comprend 94 (62 nouveaux dans cette mise à jour) essais contrôlés randomisés impliquant 9821 participants. La plupart des participants étaient des femmes habitant chez elles. Certaines études comprenaient des personnes fragiles résidant à l'hôpital ou dans des établissements d'hébergement.

De nombreux essais présentaient des défauts ou décrivait mal leurs méthodes ce qui signifie que leurs résultats pourraient être biaisées. La plupart des études n'ont rapporté que les résultats à la fin du programme d'exercice. Ils n'ont pas vérifié si les effets perduraient.

Nous avons choisi de rendre compte de mesures de l'équilibre qui sont liés à des activités quotidiennes comme le temps nécessaire pour se lever, marcher trois mètres, se tourner et retourner sassoir (Timed up & Go test) ; la capacité à se tenir debout sur une jambe (nécessaire pour une marche sûre dans des conditions bien éclairées et dans le noir), la vitesse de marche (un meilleur équilibre permet une marche plus rapide), et les activités de la vie quotidienne (Echelle d'Equilibre de Berg, comprenant 14 éléments). Voici nos principaux critères de jugement.

Il y avait huit catégories de programmes d'exercice Elles sont énumérées ci-dessous avec les mesures d'équilibre pour lesquels il y avait des preuves d'un effet positif (statistiquement significatif) du type spécifique d'exercice à la fin du programme d'exercice. Certains essais ont testé plus d'un type d'exercice. Il est important de noter que les preuves pour chaque critère de jugement ne provenaient en général que de quelques-uns des essais pour chaque catégorie d'exercice.

1. La démarche, l'équilibre, la coordination et les tâches fonctionnelles (19 études, dont 10 ont fourni des données pour un ou plusieurs critères de jugement principaux). Des effets positifs de l'exercice physique ont été trouvés pour le Timed up & Go test, la vitesse de marche, et l'Echelle d'Equilibre de Berg.

2. Exercices de renforcement (y compris exercices de résistance ou de puissance) (21 études, dont 11 ont fourni des données pour un ou plusieurs critères de jugement principaux). Des effets positifs ont été découverts pour le Timed up & Go test et la station sur une jambe aussi longtemps que possible les yeux fermés et la vitesse de marche.

3. 3D (3 dimensions) (y compris Tai Chi, Qi Gong, danse, yoga) (15 études dont sept ont fourni des données pour un ou plusieurs critères de jugement principaux). Des effets positifs ont été retrouvés pour le Timed up & Go test et la station sur une jambe aussi longtemps que possible les yeux ouverts et les yeux fermés et l'Echelle d'Equilibre de Berg.

4. Activité physique générale (marche) (sept études dont cinq ont fourni des données pour un ou plusieurs critères de jugement principaux).

5. Activité physique générale (vélo) (une étude qui a fourni des données pour la vitesse de marche).

6. Exercices d'équilibre contrôlés par ordinateur utilisant une rétroaction visuelle (deux études, dont aucune n'a fourni de données pour les critères de jugement principaux).

7. Plateformes vibrantes utilisées pour des exercices (trois études dont une a fourni des données pour le Timed up & Go test.

8. Types d'exercice multiples (combinaisons de ce qui précède) (43 études, dont 29 ont fourni des données pour un ou plusieurs critères de jugement principaux). Des effets positifs ont été découverts pour le Timed up & Go test etl a station sur une jambe aussi longtemps que possible les yeux ouverts et les yeux fermés et l'Echelle d'Equilibre de Berg.

En général, les programmes efficaces avaient lieu trois fois par semaine pendant trois mois et incluaient des exercices dynamiques en position debout. Peu d'événements indésirables ont été rapportés.

La revue a conclu qu'il n'y avait peu de preuves indiquant que certains types d'exercice sont modérément efficaces, immédiatement après l'intervention, pour améliorer l'équilibre chez les personnes âgées. Cependant, les données manquantes et les méthodes incomplètes de nombreux essais inclus impliquent que d'autres recherches de haute qualité sont nécessaires.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 20th November, 2013
Traduction financée par: Ministère du Travail, de l'Emploi et de la Santé Français

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Abstract
  7. Plain language summary
  8. 摘要
  9. 一般語言總結

Exercício para melhorar o equilíbrio em pessoas idosas

Background

A diminuição do equilíbrio em idosos está associada com diminuição de sua capacidade física e aumento do risco de quedas. Esta é uma atualização de uma Revisão Cochrane originalmente publicada em 2007.

Objectives

Avaliar os efeitos de exercícios no equilíbrio de pessoas idosas, com 60 anos de idade ou mais, residentes em suas próprias casas ou em asilos.

Search methods

As seguintes bases de dados eletrônicas foram pesquisadas: Cochrane Bone, Joint and Trauma Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 1), MEDLINE e EMBASE (até Fevereiro de 2011).

Selection criteria

Ensaios clínicos randomizados que testaram os efeitos de exercícios sobre o equilíbrio de idosos. Os desfechos primários desta revisão foram medidas clínicas de equilíbrio.

Data collection and analysis

Duplas de autores avaliaram o risco de viés e extraíram os dados dos estudos, de forma independente. Os dados foram combinados, quando apropriado.

Main results

Esta atualização incluiu 94 estudos (sendo 62 novos estudos) com um total de 9,821 participantes. A maioria dos participantes eram mulheres que moravam em suas próprias casas.

A maioria dos estudos foi classificada como tendo risco de viés incerto, geralmente devido à descrição inadequada dos métodos de randomização. A maioria dos estudos foi classificada como tendo alto risco de viés de performance devido a falta de cegamento dos participantes, o que seria inevitável para estes tipos de estudos. A maioria dos estudos apresentou desfechos somente até o final dos programas de exercício.

Os oito tipos de programas incluídos nesses estudos são apresentados abaixo, junto com as avaliações de equilíbrio para as quais foram observadas mudanças significativas ao final de cada programa de exercício. Alguns estudos testaram mais de um tipo de exercício. É importante destacar que, em geral, a evidência para cada desfecho foi proveniente de poucos estudos para cada categoria de exercício.

1. Marcha, equilíbrio, coordenação e tarefas funcionais (19 estudos, dos quais 10 apresentaram dados para os desfechos primários): Teste Up & Go (diferença média (MD) -0.82 s; IC 95% -1.56 a -0.08 s, 114 participantes, 4 estudos); velocidade de caminhada (diferença média padronizada (SMD) 0.43; IC 95% 0.11 - 0.75, 156 participantes, 4 estudos), e Escala de Equilíbrio de Berg (Berg Balance Scale) (MD 3.48 pontos; IC 95% 2.01 - 4.95 pontos, 145 participantes, 4 estudos).

2. Exercício de fortalecimento (incluindo treinamento resistido ou treinamento de potência) (21 estudos, dos quais 11 apresentaram dados para os desfechos primários): Teste Up & Go (MD -4.30 s; IC 95% -7.60 a -1.00 s, 71 participantes, 3 estudos); permanecer em pé somente em uma perna pelo maior tempo possível com os olhos fechados (MD 1.64 s; IC 95% 0.97 - 2.31 s, 120 participantes, 3 estudos); velocidade de caminhada (SMD 0.25; IC 95% 0.05 - 0.46, 375 participantes, 8 estudos).

3. Exercício 3D (tridimensional) (incluindo Tai Chi, Chi kung, dança, yoga) (15 estudos, dos quais sete apresentaram dados para os desfechos primários) Teste Up & Go (MD -1.30 s; IC 95% -2.40 a -0.20 s, 44 participantes, 1 estudo); permanecer em pé somente em uma perna pelo maior tempo possível com os olhos abertos (MD 9.60 s; IC 95% 6.64 - 12.56 s, 47 participantes, 1 estudo), e com os olhos fechados (MD 2.21 s; IC 95% 0.69 - 3.73 s, 48 participantes, 1 estudo); Escala de Equilíbrio de Berg (Berg Balance Scale) (MD 1.06 pontos; IC 95% 0.37 - 1.76 pontos, 150 participantes, 2 estudos).

4. Atividade física geral (caminhada) (sete estudos, dos quais cinco apresentaram dados para os desfechos primários).

5. Atividade física geral (andar de bicicleta) (um estudo forneceu dados para velocidade de caminhada).

6. Treinamento de equilíbrio computadorizado usando feedback visual (dois estudos, sendo que nenhum forneceu dados para os desfechos primários).

7. Plataforma vibratória utilizada como intervenção (três estudos, dos quais um forneceu dados para os desfechos primários).

8. Diversos tipos de exercícios (combinações dos tipos de exercícios citados acima) (43 estudos, dos quais 29 forneceram dados para um ou mais os desfechos primários) Teste Up & Go (MD -1.63 s; IC 95% -2.28 a -0.98 s, 635 participantes, 12 estudos); permanecer em pé somente em uma perna pelo maior tempo possível com os olhos abertos (MD 5.03 s; IC 95% 1.19 - 8.87 s, 545 participantes, 9 estudos), e com os olhos fechados (MD 1.60 s; IC 95% -0.01 - 3.20 s, 176 participantes, 2 estudos); Escala de Berg (Berg Balance Scale) (MD 1.84 pontos; IC 95% 0.71 - 2.97 pontos, 80 participantes, 2 estudos).

Poucos eventos adversos foram relatados, porém a maioria dos estudos não monitorou ou relatou eventos adversos.

Em geral, os programas mais efetivos foram aqueles que eram realizados três vezes por semana, por três meses e envolviam exercícios dinâmicos enquanto a pessoa permanecia em pé.

Authors' conclusions

Existem evidências fracas de que alguns tipos de exercícios (marcha, equilíbrio, coordenação e tarefas funcionais; exercícios de fortalecimento; exercícios tridimensionais e combinações de exercícios) são moderadamente efetivos imediatamente após a intervenção, na melhora clínica dos desfechos de equilíbrio em idosos. Estas intervenções são provavelmente seguras. Existe pouca ou nenhuma evidência para se chegar a alguma conclusão sobre a efetividade de atividade física geral (caminhada ou andar de bicicleta) e de exercícios envolvendo programas computadorizados de equilíbrio ou plataformas vibratórias. São necessárias mais pesquisas de alta qualidade metodológica, que meçam desfechos relevantes e que façam um acompanhamento adequado dos participantes.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Abstract
  7. Plain language summary
  8. 摘要
  9. 一般語言總結

Exercício para melhorar o equilíbrio em pessoas idosas

Exercício para melhorar o equilíbrio em pessoas idosas

O equilíbrio é a capacidade de uma pessoa permanecer ereta e firme quando ela está parada em pé, sentada ou durante um movimento. A perda da capacidade de se equilibrar pode aumentar os riscos de quedas, levar a maior grau de dependência e às vezes, morte prematura. Entretanto, existem dúvidas sobre quais seriam os exercícios mais indicados para ajudar a melhorar o equilíbrio de idosos (com 60 ou mais anos de idade) que moram em suas casas ou em asilos.

Esta revisão atualizada inclui 94 estudos (sendo que 62 desses eram novos) randomizados controlados envolvendo 9821 participantes. A maioria dos participantes eram mulheres que moravam em suas próprias casas. Alguns estudos incluíram pessoas debilitadas que moravam em hospitais ou em casas de repouso.

Muitos estudos usaram métodos inadequados ou mal descritos, o que significa que seus achados podem ter vieses. A maioria dos estudos avaliou os resultados somente até o final do programa de exercício. Portanto, eles não verificaram se havia algum efeito duradouro.

Nós optamos por apresentar as medidas de equilíbrio que estão mais relacionadas com as atividades do dia a dia, como por exemplo o tempo para se levantar, andar três metros, virar e voltar a sentar (Teste Up & Go); a habilidade de permanecer em uma perna só (necessária para se andar com segurança em ambientes bem ou mal iluminados), a velocidade de caminhada (um melhor equilíbrio permite andar mais rápido), e atividades de vida diária (Escala de equilíbrio de Berg, contendo 14 itens). Estes foram os nossos desfechos primários.

Os estudos apresentaram oito tipos diferentes de programas de exercícios. Estes estão listados abaixo, juntamente com as medidas de equilíbrio para as quais foi observada alguma melhora (estatisticamente significante) ao final do programa de exercício. Alguns estudos testaram mais de um tipo de exercício. É importante salientar que o resultado apresentado para cada desfecho veio, na maioria das vezes, de alguns poucos estudos.

1. Marcha, equilíbrio, coordenação e tarefas funcionais (19 estudos, dos quais 10 apresentaram dados para um ou mais dos desfechos primários). Produziram efeitos positivos sobre o Teste Up & Go, a velocidade da caminhada, e a Escala de Equilíbrio de Berg.

2. Exercício de fortalecimento (incluindo treinamento resistido ou treinamento de potência) (21 estudos, dos quais 11 apresentaram dados para os desfechos primários). Produziram efeitos positivos sobre o Teste Up & Go, permanecer em pé somente em uma perna pelo maior tempo possível com os olhos fechados e sobre a velocidade de caminhada.

3. Exercício 3D (tridimensional) (incluindo Tai Chi, Chi kung, dança, yoga) (15 estudos, dos quais sete apresentaram para um ou mais desfechos primários). Produziram efeitos positivos sobre o Teste Up & Go; permanecer em pé somente em uma perna pelo maior tempo possível com os olhos abertos , e com os olhos fechados; e na Escala de Equilíbrio de Berg.

4. Atividade física geral (caminhada) (sete estudos, dos quais cinco apresentaram dados para um ou mais dos desfechos primários).

5. Atividade física geral (andar de bicicleta) (um estudo apresentou dados para velocidade de caminhada).

6. Treinamento de equilíbrio computadorizado usando feedback visual (dois estudos, dos quais nenhum apresentou dados para desfechos primários).

7. Plataforma vibratória utilizada como intervenção (três estudos, dos quais um apresentou dados para o Teste Up & Go).

8. Múltiplos tipos de exercícios (combinações dos exercícios citados acima) (43 estudos, dos quais 29 apresentaram dados para um ou mais desfechos primários). Produziram efeitos positivos sobre o Teste Up & Go; permanecer em pé somente em uma perna pelo maior tempo possível com os olhos abertos, e com os olhos fechados; e na Escala de Equilíbrio Berg.

Em geral, os programas que produziram efeitos positivos eram realizados três vezes por semana, por três meses e envolveram exercícios dinâmicos enquanto a pessoa permanecia em pé. Poucos eventos adversos foram relatados.

A conclusão desta revisão é que existe evidência fraca de que alguns tipos de exercícios melhoram, de forma moderada, o equilíbrio de pessoas idosas, imediatamente após o programa. Porém, são necessários mais estudos de boa qualidade sobre esse tema, uma vez que muitos dos estudos incluídos nesta revisão tinham poucos dados e usaram métodos inadequados.

Translation notes

Translated by: Brazilian Cochrane Centre
Translation Sponsored by: None

 

摘要

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Abstract
  7. Plain language summary
  8. 摘要
  9. 一般語言總結

改善老年人平衡功能的運動療法

背景

老年人如果平衡能力不佳,經常會伴隨運動能力的下降及跌倒風險的上升。本文是一篇最早發表於2007年的Cochrane回顧之更新。

目標

針對年滿60歲、居住於社區或醫護機構的老年人,檢視運動療法對於平衡能力的影響。

搜尋策略

我們搜尋了Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register、CENTRAL(The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 1)、MEDLINE及EMBASE等資料庫(資料截至2011年2月)。

選擇標準

我們納入了:針對老年人測試運動療法對平衡能力的影響之隨機對照試驗(randomised controlled trial)。本回顧的主要預後指標為平衡能力的臨床測量。

資料收集與分析

成對的回顧作者獨立地評估了各研究的偏差(bias)風險,並萃取其中的資料。適當情況下會對資料進行統合。

主要結論

本回顧納入了94項研究(62項新研究)、一共9821位受試者。大部分的受試者為居住於自宅內的女性。

經過判定,大部分試驗存有選樣偏差(selection bias)的風險都不明確,整體而言反映了這些論文對隨機分配方式描述不足的問題;此外,大部分試驗因為缺乏對受試者的盲法設計(為同類試驗通常都難以避免的問題),所以存有表現偏差(performance bias)的風險都很高。大部分研究的預後指標都只報告到運動療程結束時。

總共有8類的運動療程。這些療程,以及主要平衡能力指標(僅列出經某些證據顯示,運動療程結束時存在統計上顯著療效者)均羅列於下方。部分試驗所測試的運動類型不只一種。關鍵的一點在於,各項預後指標的證據往往只來自少數幾份探討該運動類型的試驗。

1. 步態、平衡、協調與功能性任務(共19項研究;其中10項提供了主要預後指標的數據):計時起走測驗(Timed Up & Go test)(平均差〔MD〕:-0.82秒;95% CI:-1.56 ~ -0.08秒;114位受試者、4項研究);行走速度(標準化平均差〔MSD〕:0.43;95% CI:0.11 ~ 0.75;156位受試者、4項研究);以及柏格平衡量表(Berg Balance Scale)(MD:3.48分;95% CI:2.01 ~ 4.95分;145位受試者、4項研究)。

2. 強化運動(包含阻力或肌力訓練)(共21項研究;其中11項提供了主要預後指標的數據):計時起走測驗(MD:-4.30秒;95% CI:-7.60 ~ -1.00秒;71位受試者、3項研究);閉眼時單腳站立最長時間測試(MD:1.64秒;95% CI:0.97 ~ 2.31秒;120位受試者、3項研究);以及行走速度(SMD:0.25;95% CI:0.05 ~ 0.46;375位受試者、8項研究)。

3. 3D(3維)運動(包含太極、氣功、舞蹈、瑜珈)(共15項研究;其中7項提供了主要預後指標的數據):計時起走測驗(MD:-1.30秒;95% CI:-2.40 ~ -0.20秒;44位受試者、1項研究);開眼時(MD:9.60秒;95% CI:6.64 ~ 12.56秒;47位受試者、1項研究)及閉眼時單腳站立最長時間測試(MD:2.21秒;95% CI:0.69 ~ 3.73秒;48位受試者、1項研究);以及柏格平衡量表(MD:1.06分;95% CI:0.37 ~ 1.76分;150位受試者、2項研究)。

4. 一般體能活動(行走)(共7項研究;其中5項提供了主要預後指標的數據)。

5. 一般體能活動(騎單車)(1項研究提供了行走速度的數據)。

6. 利用視覺回饋的電腦化平衡訓練(2項研究,均未提供主要預後指標的數據)。

7. 作為一項介入治療的振動平台(vibration platform)(共3項研究;其中1項提供了主要預後指標的數據)。

8. 多重運動類型(上述各項的組合)(共43項研究;其中29項為一或多項主要預後指標提供了數據):計時起走測驗(MD:-1.63秒;95% CI:-2.28 ~ -0.98秒;635位受試者、12項研究);開眼時(MD:5.03秒;95% CI:1.19 ~ 8.87秒;545位受試者、9項研究)及閉眼時單腳站立最長時間測試(MD:1.60秒;95% CI:-0.01 ~ 3.20秒;176位受試者、2項研究);以及柏格平衡量表(MD:1.84分;95% CI:0.71 ~ 2.97分;80位受試者、2項研究)。

試驗報告出非常少的不良事件,但大部分的研究並未針對不良事件進行監測或報告。

整體而論,較有效的療程為:每週進行3次、持續3個月,且內容涉及站姿動態運動的療程。

作者結論

存在較弱的證據顯示:部分類型的運動(步態、平衡、協調與功能性任務;強化運動;3D運動及多種運動型態)在施行後當下,可改善老年人的平衡相關臨床預後指標(有效性為中度)。這些介入療法可能尚屬安全。而針對一般體能活動(行走或騎單車),以及涉及電腦化平衡療程或振動板的運動方式,目前則無證據、或證據不足以導出任何結論。未來仍需要進一步進行方法學品質高、採用核心預後指標(core outcome measures),且監測設計適當的研究。

 

一般語言總結

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié
  6. Abstract
  7. Plain language summary
  8. 摘要
  9. 一般語言總結

改善老年人平衡功能的運動療法

改善老年人平衡功能的運動療法

平衡意指個體靜止時(如站立或坐著時)或移動時,能夠保持身體直立且穩定。平衡能力的喪失,可能與跌倒風險增加、生活依賴性上升有關,有時甚至也與壽命縮短有關。然而,目前我們還不清楚:針對居家或安養機構中的老年人(年滿60歲),哪些類型的運動最能有效改善其平衡能力。

本項更新版回顧文章納入了94項隨機對照試驗(62項為本版新增者)(共9821位受試者)。大部分的受試者為居住於自宅內的女性。部分研究還包含了居住於醫院或安養機構的孱弱個案。

在這些試驗中,許多試驗的方法具有缺陷或描述不完整,意謂著其結果可能具有偏差。大部分研究的預後指標都只報告到運動療程結束時,而未確認是否存在任何持續性效應。

我們最後決定針對與每天日常活動相關的平衡指標進行報告,如:站立、行走3公尺、轉彎,再返回坐下所費時間(計時起走測驗);單腳站立之能力(對於明亮與黑暗環境下的行走安全相當必要);行走速度(平衡功能佳,才能走得快);以及日常活動(柏格平衡量表,共含14個項目)。此即我們的主要預後指標。

總共有8類的運動療程。這些療程,以及平衡功能指標(僅列出經某些證據顯示,運動療程結束時該特定運動類型產生了正向〔統計上顯著〕療效者)均羅列於下方。部分試驗所測試的運動類型不只一種。務必注意,各項預後指標的證據往往只來自少數幾份探討該運動類型的試驗。

1. 步態、平衡、協調與功能性任務(共19項研究;其中10項研究為一或多項主要預後指標提供了數據):在計時起走測驗、行走速度及柏格平衡量表方面,找到了運動的正向療效。

2. 強化運動(包含阻力或肌力訓練)(共21項研究;其中11項研究為一或多項主要預後指標提供了數據):在計時起走測驗、閉眼時單腳站立最長時間測試,以及行走速度方面,找到了正向療效。

3. 3D(3維)運動(包含太極、氣功、舞蹈、瑜珈)(共15項研究;其中7項研究為一或多項主要預後指標提供了數據):在計時起走測驗、開眼時和閉眼時單腳站立最長時間測試,以及柏格平衡量表方面,找到了正向療效。

4. 一般體能活動(行走)(共7項研究;其中5項研究為一或多項主要預後指標提供了數據)。

5. 一般體能活動(騎單車)(1項研究提供了行走速度的數據)。

6. 利用視覺回饋的電腦化平衡訓練(2項研究,均未提供主要預後指標的數據)。

7. 作為一項介入治療的振動平台(共3項研究;其中1項研究為計時起走測驗提供了數據)。

8. 多重運動類型(上述各項的組合)(共43項研究;其中29項研究為一或多項主要預後指標提供了數據):在計時起走測驗、開眼時和閉眼時單腳站立最長時間測試,以及柏格平衡量表方面,找到了正向療效。

整體而論,較有效的療程為:每週進行3次、持續3個月,且內容涉及站姿動態運動的療程。只有非常少的不良事件被報告。

本篇回顧結論:部分類型的運動在施行後當下,可以對老年人的平衡功能有中度效果的改善。然而,在納入的試驗中,多項試驗的數據遺漏且研究方法具有缺陷,意謂著將來仍須進行高品質的研究。

譯註

East Asian Cochrane Alliance 翻譯
翻譯由 台灣衛生福利部/台北醫學大學實證醫學研究中心 資助