Intervention Review

You have free access to this content

Aripiprazole alone or in combination for acute mania

  1. Rachel Brown1,*,
  2. Matthew J Taylor2,
  3. John Geddes3

Editorial Group: Cochrane Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Group

Published Online: 17 DEC 2013

Assessed as up-to-date: 31 JUL 2013

DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD005000.pub2


How to Cite

Brown R, Taylor MJ, Geddes J. Aripiprazole alone or in combination for acute mania. Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews 2013, Issue 12. Art. No.: CD005000. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD005000.pub2.

Author Information

  1. 1

    Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust, Clinical Pharmacy Support Unit, Oxford, UK

  2. 2

    Institute of Psychiatry, King's College London, Department of Psychosis Studies, London, UK

  3. 3

    University of Oxford/Warneford Hospital, Department of Psychiatry, Oxford, UK

*Rachel Brown, Clinical Pharmacy Support Unit, Oxford Health NHS Foundation Trust, Unit 46, Sandford Lane, Kennington, Oxford, OX1 5RW, UK. rachel.brown@oxfordhealth.nhs.uk.

Publication History

  1. Publication Status: New
  2. Published Online: 17 DEC 2013

SEARCH

 

Abstract

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Background

Bipolar disorder is a mental disorder characterised by episodes of elevated or irritable mood (manic or hypomanic episodes) and episodes of low mood and loss of energy (depressive episodes). Drug treatment is the first-line treatment for acute mania with the initial aim of rapid control of agitation, aggression and dangerous behaviour. Aripiprazole, an atypical antipsychotic, is used in the treatment of mania both as monotherapy and combined with other medicines. The British Association of Psychopharmacology guidelines report that, in monotherapy placebo-controlled trials, the atypical antipsychotics, including aripiprazole, have been shown to be effective for acute manic or mixed episodes.

Objectives

To assess the efficacy and tolerability of aripiprazole alone or in combination with other antimanic drug treatments, compared with placebo and other drug treatments, in alleviating acute symptoms of manic or mixed episodes. Other objectives include reviewing the acceptability of treatment with aripiprazole, investigating the adverse effects of aripiprazole treatment, and determining overall mortality rates among those receiving aripiprazole treatment.

Search methods

The Cochrane Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Group's Specialised Register (CCDANCTR-Studies and CCDANCTR-References) was searched, all years to 31st July 2013. This register contains relevant randomised controlled trials from: The Cochrane Library (all years), MEDLINE (1950 to date), EMBASE (1974 to date), and PsycINFO (1967 to date). We also searched Bristol-Myers Squibb clinical trials register, the World Health Organization (WHO) trials portal (ICTRP) and ClinicalTrials.gov (to August 2013).

Selection criteria

Randomised trials comparing aripiprazole versus placebo or other drugs in the treatment of acute manic or mixed episodes.

Data collection and analysis

Two review authors independently extracted data, including adverse effect data, from trial reports and assessed bias. The drug manufacturer or the trial authors were contacted for missing data.

Main results

Ten studies (3340 participants) were included in the review. Seven studies compared aripiprazole monotherapy versus placebo (2239 participants); two of these included a third comparison arm—one study used lithium (485 participants) and the other used haloperidol (480 participants). Two studies compared aripiprazole as an adjunctive treatment to valproate or lithium versus placebo as an adjunctive treatment (754 participants), and one study compared aripiprazole versus haloperidol (347 participants). The overall risk of bias was unclear. A high dropout rate from most trials (> 20% for each intervention in eight of the trials) may have affected the estimates of relative efficacy. Evidence shows that aripiprazole was more effective than placebo in reducing manic symptoms in adults and children/adolescents at three and four weeks but not at six weeks (Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS); mean difference (MD) at three weeks (random effects) -3.66, 95% confidence interval (CI) -5.82 to -2.05; six studies; N = 1819, moderate quality evidence) - a modest difference. Aripiprazole was compared with other drug treatments in three studies in adults—lithium was used in one study and haloperidol in two studies. No statistically significant differences between aripiprazole and other drug treatments in reducing manic symptoms were noted at three weeks (YMRS MD at three weeks (random effects) 0.07, 95% CI -1.24 to 1.37; three studies; N = 972, moderate quality evidence) or at any other time point up to and including 12 weeks. Compared with placebo, aripiprazole caused more movement disorders, as measured on the Simpson Angus Scale (SAS), on the Barnes Akathisia Scale (BAS) and by participant-reported akathisia (high quality evidence), with more people requiring treatment with anticholinergic medication (risk ratios (random effects) 3.28, 95% CI 1.82 to 5.91; two studies; N = 730, high quality evidence). Aripiprazole also led to more gastrointestinal disturbances (nausea (high quality evidence), and constipation) and caused more children/adolescents to have a prolactin level that fell below the lower limit of normal. Significant heterogeneity was present in the meta-analysis of movement disorders associated with aripiprazole and other treatments and was most likely due to the different side effect profiles of lithium and haloperidol. At the three-week time point, meta-analysis was not possible because of lack of data; however, at 12 weeks, haloperidol resulted in significantly more movement disorders than aripiprazole, as measured on the SAS, the BAS and the Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale (AIMS) and by participant-reported akathisia. By 12 weeks, investigators reported no difference between aripiprazole and lithium (SAS, BAS, AIMS), except in terms of participant-reported akathisia (RR 2.97, 95% CI 1.37 to 6.43; one study; N = 313).

Authors' conclusions

Aripiprazole is an effective treatment for mania in a population that includes adults, children and adolescents, although its use leads to gastrointestinal disturbances and movement disorders. Comparative trials with medicines other than haloperidol and lithium are few, so the precise place of aripiprazole in therapy remains unclear.

 

Plain language summary

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

Aripiprazole alone or in combination with other drugs for treating the acute mania phase of bipolar disorder

Bipolar disorder is a mental disorder that is seen as periods of high mood called mania, or hypomania if less severe, and periods of low mood (depression).

Medication is the main treatment for mania, with the first aim to decrease agitation, aggression and dangerous behaviour.

Antipsychotics and other antimanic medicines are included in guidelines for treating mania. This review considers the antipsychotic, aripiprazole, and assesses how effective it is in the treatment of acute mania. It also examines the side effects of aripiprazole and discusses whether people find aripiprazole to be an acceptable treatment for themselves.

Ten studies are included (3340 participants). Most studies compared aripiprazole versus placebo, but some researchers compared aripiprazole versus haloperidol (two studies) and versus lithium (one study). Two studies examined the effect of adding aripiprazole to another treatment (valproate or lithium) and compared this combination versus placebo combined with these other treatments. We assessed the overall risk of bias in the ten studies as unclear.

The main measure of effect was the mean change on the Young Mania Rating Scale from the start to the end of the trial; this tool is used by clinicians to assess the severity of mania. After three weeks of treatment, aripiprazole was better than placebo at reducing the severity of mania when used on its own or when added to other mood stabilisers. The effect was modest. However, aripiprazole caused more inner restlessness (akathisia), nausea, and constipation than placebo. Aripiprazole was similarly effective in reducing the symptoms of mania when compared with other drug treatments (haloperidol and lithium). Aripiprazole caused fewer movement disorders and less raised prolactin (a hormone secreted by the pituitary gland) than haloperidol. People taking aripiprazole were more likely to remain on treatment than those taking haloperidol but were no more or less likely than those taking placebo or lithium. The main reason for the difference in dropouts between aripiprazole and haloperidol groups was the adverse effects associated with haloperidol.

In summary, aripiprazole is an effective treatment for mania when compared with placebo. This finding is based on studies that included mixed populations (i.e. children, adolescents and adults). For the adult population, studies have directly compared aripiprazole versus haloperidol, lithium and placebo, but evidence obtained for treatment of the child and adolescent population is available only from placebo-controlled studies. Given the lack of evidence obtained by comparing aripiprazole versus other drugs, its exact place in therapy is unclear. Further studies focused on particular populations are needed to determine whether this treatment is equally effective in different age groups.

 

Résumé

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

L'aripiprazole seul ou en combinaison dans le traitement de la manie

Contexte

Le trouble bipolaire est un trouble mental qui est défini comme des périodes d’élévation de l'humeur (manie, ou hypomanie dans sa forme moins sévère) et des périodes d'humeur maussade (épisodes dépressifs). Le traitement médicamenteux est le traitement de première ligne pour la manie aiguë avec pour but de contrôler rapidement l'agitation, l'agressivité et le comportement dangereux. L'aripiprazole, un antipsychotique atypique, est utilisé dans le traitement de la manie en tant que monothérapie et comme combinaison à d'autres médicaments. Les directives de l’association britannique sur la psychopharmacologie ont rapportées que lors d’essais contrôlés par placebo pour la monothérapie, les antipsychotiques atypiques, y compris l'aripiprazole, se sont avérés efficaces pour le traitement de la manie aiguë ou d’épisodes mixtes.

Objectifs

Évaluer l'efficacité et la tolérance de l'aripiprazole seul ou combiné à d'autres médicaments antimaniaques par rapport à un placebo et à d'autres traitements médicamenteux, pour atténuer les symptômes de la manie aiguë ou d’épisodes mixtes. D'autres objectifs comprennent l'évaluation de l'acceptabilité du traitement avec l'aripiprazole, en examinant les effets indésirables du traitement à l'aripiprazole et en déterminant les taux de mortalité globaux chez les patients sous traitement à l'aripiprazole.

Stratégie de recherche documentaire

Le registre spécialisé du groupe Cochrane sur la dépression, l'anxiété et la névrose (études du CCDANCTR et références du CCDANCTR) a été consulté, toutes les années jusqu' au 31 juillet 2013. Ce registre contient des essais contrôlés randomisés pertinents issus de: la bibliothèque Cochrane (toutes les années), MEDLINE (de 1950 à aujourd'hui), EMBASE (de 1974 à aujourd'hui) et PsycINFO (de 1967 à aujourd'hui). Nous avons également effectué des recherches dans le registre des essais cliniques Bristol-Myers Squibb, le système d’enregistrement international des essais cliniques (ICTRP) de l'Organisation Mondiale de la Santé (OMS) et ClinicalTrials.gov (jusqu' en août 2013).

Critères de sélection

Essais randomisés comparant l'aripiprazole par rapport à un placebo ou à d'autres médicaments dans le traitement de la manie aiguë ou d’épisodes mixtes.

Recueil et analyse des données

Deux auteurs de la revue ont indépendamment extrait les données, y compris les données des rapports d'essais sur les effets indésirables et évalué le biais. Le fabricant de ce médicament ou les auteurs des essais ont été contactés pour obtenir des données manquantes.

Résultats Principaux

Dix études (3 340 participants) ont été inclues dans la revue. Sept études comparaient l'aripiprazole en monothérapie par rapport au placebo (2 239 participants); deux de ces études incluaient une troisième comparaison – une étude utilisait du lithium (485 participants) et l'autre utilisait l'halopéridol (480 participants). Deux études comparaient l'aripiprazole en tant que traitement complémentaire au valproate de sodium ou de lithium par rapport à un placebo en tant que traitement complémentaire (754 participants) et une étude comparait l'aripiprazole par rapport à l'halopéridol (347 participants). Le risque global de biais n'était pas clair. Un taux d'abandons élevés dans la plupart des essais (> 20% pour chaque intervention dans huit essais) pourrait avoir affecté les estimations de l'efficacité relative. Les preuves indiquent que l'aripiprazole était plus efficace que le placebo pour réduire les symptômes de la manie chez les adultes et enfants/adolescents à trois et quatre semaines, mais pas au bout de six semaines (échelle d’évaluation de la manie de Young (YMRS - Young Mania Rating Scale); différence moyenne (DM) à trois semaines (effets aléatoires) -3,66, intervalle de confiance à 95% (IC) de -5,82 à -2,05; six études, N =1819, preuves de qualité modérée) - une différence modeste. L'aripiprazole était comparée à d'autres traitements médicamenteux dans trois études chez les adultes – le lithium était utilisé dans une étude et l'halopéridol dans deux études. Aucune différence statistiquement significative entre l'aripiprazole et les autres traitements médicamenteux dans la réduction des symptômes de la manie n’a été observée à trois semaines (DM de YMRS à trois semaines (effets aléatoires) 0,07, IC à 95% -1,24 à 1,37; trois études; N =972, preuves de qualité modérée) ou à toute autre période allant jusqu'à la semaine 12 inclue. Par rapport au placebo, l'aripiprazole a causé plus de troubles du mouvement, tels que mesurés sur l'échelle Simpson-Angus (SAS - Simpson Angus Scale), sur l’échelle d’acathisie de Barnes (BAS - Barnes Akathisia Scale) et par les participants rapportant l'acathisie (preuves de haute qualité), avec davantage de patients nécessitant un traitement par médicaments anticholinergiques (risque relatif (effets aléatoires) 3,28, IC à 95% de 1,82 à 5,91; deux études; N =730, preuves de haute qualité). L'aripiprazole a aussi engendré des troubles gastro-intestinaux (nausées (preuves de haute qualité) et constipation) et a entraîné davantage d'enfants/adolescents à avoir un niveau de prolactine plus faible que la limite normale. Une hétérogénéité significative était observée dans la méta-analyse des troubles du mouvement associés à l'aripiprazole et à d'autres traitements et était plus probable en raison des différents profils d'effets secondaires du lithium et de l'halopéridol. À trois semaines, la méta-analyse n'a pas été possible en raison du manque de données; cependant, à 12 semaines, l'halopéridol a entraîné significativement plus de troubles du mouvement que l'aripiprazole, tels que mesurés sur l'échelle Simpson-Angus, sur l’échelle d’acathisie de Barnes, sur l’échelle des mouvements involontaires anormaux (AIMS - Abnormal Involuntary Movement Scale) et par les participants rapportant l'acathisie. À 12 semaines, les investigateurs ne rapportaient aucune différence entre l'aripiprazole et le lithium (SAS, BAS, AIMS), sauf en termes d’acathisie rapportée par les participants (RR 2,97, IC à 95% 1,37 à 6,43; une étude; N =313).

Conclusions des auteurs

L'aripiprazole est un traitement efficace pour la manie chez une population qui inclut les adultes, les enfants et les adolescents, bien que son usage conduise à des troubles gastro-intestinaux et des troubles du mouvement. Les essais comparatifs avec des médicaments autres que l'halopéridol et le lithium sont peu nombreux, de sorte que la fonction précise de l'aripiprazole dans le traitement reste incertaine.

 

Résumé simplifié

  1. Top of page
  2. Abstract
  3. Plain language summary
  4. Résumé
  5. Résumé simplifié

L'aripiprazole seul ou en combinaison dans le traitement de la manie

L'aripiprazole seul ou en combinaison avec d'autres médicaments dans le traitement de la manie aiguë du trouble bipolaire

Le trouble bipolaire est un trouble mental qui est défini comme des périodes d’élévation de l'humeur (manie ou hypomanie dans sa forme moins sévère) et des périodes d'humeur maussade (dépression).

Les médicaments sont le principal traitement de la manie, avec comme première intention de réduire l'agitation, l'agressivité et le comportement dangereux.

Un traitement antipsychotique et d'autres médicaments antimaniaques sont inclus dans les recommandations pour le traitement de la manie. Cette revue porte sur l'antipsychotique, l'aripiprazole et évalue son efficacité dans le traitement de la manie. Les effets secondaires de l'aripiprazole ont également été examinés, de même que l’acceptabilité de l'aripiprazole chez les patients.

Dix études ont été incluses (3 340 participants). La plupart des études comparaient l'aripiprazole par rapport à un placebo, mais certains chercheurs ont comparé l'aripiprazole par rapport à l'halopéridol (deux études) et par rapport à du lithium (une étude). Deux études examinaient l'effet de l'ajout de l'aripiprazole à un autre traitement (le valproate ou le lithium) et comparaient cette combinaison par rapport au placebo combiné avec ces autres traitements. Nous avons évalué le risque de biais global dans les dix études comme étant incertain.

Le critère principal était le changement moyen sur l'échelle d’évaluation de la manie de Young du début à la fin de l'essai; cet outil est utilisé par les cliniciens pour évaluer la gravité de la manie. Après trois semaines de traitement, l'aripiprazole était plus efficace que le placebo pour réduire la gravité de la manie lorsqu' il était utilisé seul ou combiné à d'autres stabilisateurs d'humeur. L'effet était modeste. Cependant, l'aripiprazole a causé plus d’agitation intérieure (l'acathésie), de nausées et de constipation que le placebo. L'aripiprazole était aussi efficace pour réduire les symptômes de la manie par rapport à d'autres traitements médicamenteux (l’halopéridol et le lithium). L'aripiprazole a entraîné moins de troubles du mouvement et moins de prolactine élevée (une hormone sécrétée par le l’hypophyse) que l'halopéridol. Les patients sous aripiprazole étaient plus susceptibles de continuer le traitement que ceux prenant de l'halopéridol, mais n'étaient ni plus ni moins enclins que ceux prenant un placebo ou du lithium. La principale raison de la différence dans les sorties d'étude entre les groupes à l'aripiprazole et ceux à l'halopéridol était les effets indésirables associés à l'halopéridol.

En résumé, l'aripiprazole est un traitement efficace pour la manie par rapport à un placebo. Ce résultat est basé sur des études ayant inclus des populations mixtes (c'est-à-dire des enfants, adolescents et adultes). Pour la population adulte, des études ont comparé directement l'aripiprazole par rapport à l'halopéridol, au lithium et au placebo, mais les preuves obtenues pour le traitement chez l'enfant et chez l'adolescent sont uniquement issues d'études contrôlées par placebo. Étant donné le manque de preuves obtenues en comparant l'aripiprazole à d'autres médicaments, son rôle exact dans le traitement n'est pas clair. D'autres études portant sur des populations plus ciblées sont nécessaires pour déterminer si ce traitement est tout aussi efficace pour les différents groupes d'âge.

Notes de traduction

Traduit par: French Cochrane Centre 14th January, 2014
Traduction financée par: Financeurs pour le Canada : Instituts de Recherche en Santé du Canada, Ministère de la Santé et des Services Sociaux du Québec, Fonds de recherche du Québec-Santé et Institut National d'Excellence en Santé et en Services Sociaux; pour la France : Ministère en charge de la Santé